One of the newest bearded gents to hit the superhero scene is Jason Momoa's Aquaman! With just a glimpse of the character in 2016's Batman V Superman, he's going full bore in the Justice League movie. So, now would be the perfect time to showcase both your scruffy beard and your swimming prowess! Add a wig along with your own long beard when you go in this jumpsuit to get the perfect DC Comics look.
He first appeared as a Peter Parker double emerging from one of the Jackal's pods that initially an amnesiac but later believed himself to be the real Peter Parker, having been kept in stasis since the first Clone Saga. He claimed that both Peter Parker and Ben Reilly were his clones. However, upon meeting Parker, Reilly and Kaine, the Jackal's programming kicked in and he went insane before shapeshifting into a freakish giant, therefore revealing his true status as a clone. In denial of the truth, he tried to kill the "clones" and to claim Peter Parker's life as his own. He was even infatuated with Parker's wife Mary Jane Watson and seeks to have her as his bride. Since their first encounter, Reilly realizes that Spidercide is twisted from the start and expresses disgust of his corrupted doppelgänger's immorality, tauntingly refers him as "Freakface" once the villainous clone's shapeshifting powers manifest. However, this also causes Reilly to be afraid of his and Parker's capabilities for wicked if they allow themselves demoralize as Spidercide.
From Tom De Haven and Dean Wesley Smith's look at Spidey's early career, to David Michelinie's portrait of a dying reporter who wants his last story to be the revelation of Spider-Man's true identity, to Lawrence Watt-Evan's tale of a bot whose web-slinger hero-worship leads to tragedy, plus stories by Craig Shaw Gardner, Ann Nocenti, Robert L. Washington III, Greg Cox, Christopher Golden, and many more-- here are spectaclar new tales of Spider-Man adventure!
Dr. Doom has broken Dr. Octopus out of prison as the final mover in the latest plan for world conquest. Using Ock's expertise to help him draw on the arcane energies of the Negative Zone, Doom has found a way to wield absolute power. Now the only thing standing between Doom and his goals are Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four--and one of the F.F. is already Doom's prisoner!

Rocking out a thundering DIY Thor costume you crafted at home is a weekend job. According to Marvel, Thor is the God of lightning and thunder as well as one of the Asgard Lords. A Thor costume must have a red cape (make use of your curtains), a black or silver undershirt, a bulky belt, and boots. Thor’s mighty hammer, known as the Mjölnir, is a must. One of the superpowers he possesses is an ability to produce infinite magical power called Odinforce. No wonder why Thor almost broke Captain America’s shield by throwing the Mjölnir at him. Anyway, you can create a Mjölnir easily out of cardboard. Here’s a quick video on how you can do it.
Peter Parquagh is a counterpart to Peter in the miniseries Marvel 1602, albeit without powers. In the series he acts as an apprentice to the royal spymaster Sir Nicholas Fury. A running gag involves Peter repeatedly almost getting bitten by unusual spiders, something that finally occurs at the very end. In the sequel, 1602: New World, he takes the identity of the Spider. Later, Peter's dual identity is revealed, and with the death of his beloved Virginia Dare at the hands of Norman Osborne, he returns to Europe and falls in love with Marion Jane Watson and joins her family of theater performers. During a battle with Baron Octavius, Norman Osborn, and Curtis Connors in Venice, a bystander picks up some of Peter's webbing which eventually served as the basis for the Super Soldier Serum and created Captain America in World War II in this universe.[26] While in the Globe theatre, he is attacked and killed by the supervillain Morlun.[27][28]
After Octavius tries to retrieve some of Parker’s memories in an attempt to solve a revirbium related problem, Peter's consciousness begins to re-emerge, having somehow escaped the mind-purge. When Otto is possessed by the Venom Symbiote and is unable to free himself of it, Peter's consciousness again emerges and breaks the Symbiote's hold over Dr. Octopus, enabling Flash Thompson to call it back to him.
In 2008, Spider-Man: Web of Shadows was released. It contained an original storyline not related to the movies, in which players switch between Spidey's Black costume and his classic Red & Blue attire. Player's can dictate Spider-Man's actions, as he can be Heroic or Villainous, as related to his dependence on the symbiote. Many characters appear including Venom, Kingpin, Wolverine, Luke Cage, Mary Jane and others. It also has 4 different endings based on the path the player chooses. The consoles for this game are PS2, PS3, PC, Wii, Xbox, Xbox 360, PSP. Note: The PSP & PS2 versions of the game are very different from that of the PS3, Wii, Xbox 360 and PC versions. Spider-Man, voiced by Benjamin Diskin appears in Marvel: Ultimate Alliance 2 and is also one of the main characters. In the Pro-Registration story, he can wear his Iron Spider costume.
Monty Walsh Montgomery Walsh Marvel Spotlight Vol. 2 #11 (1981) A cat burglar. He became Captain Universe after he was shot when trying to rob the house of a former Maggia boss named Guido Carboni. After Montgomery defeated Guido Carboni, the Enigma Power left him as Montgomery dies and the police find Guido raving that the dead man was Captain Universe.
Spider-Man possesses his father's automatic camera which zones in on the spider symbol on Spider-Man's chest. It takes photos whenever movement is made in front of it. He would place the camera in a certain spot and springs into action in front of it, allowing him to take photos of himself. As Spider-Man he uses the camera to capture his heroic exploits to then sell the photos to the Daily Bugle.
^ Although she is listed with the supervillains as she sometimes is depicted in certain portrayals. The Black Cat is more regarded as a anti-heroine than fully supervillain. A character that struggles in between deciding good and bad...and the major femme fatale romantic interest for Spider-Man. Her key role of deciding between crime and having complicated relationships of Spider-Man makes her sometimes labeled as part with the rest of the major rogues gallery of Spider-Man. Nonetheless she has been a staple supporting Spider-Man character during her debut.[1]
“We are not asking to be coddled,” the open letter insists. “The real coddling is telling the privileged majority on campus that they do not have to engage with the brutal pasts that are a part of the costumes they seek to wear.” But no one asserted that students should not be questioned about offensive costumes––only that fellow Yale students, not meddling administrators, should do the questioning, conduct the conversations, and shape the norms for themselves.  “We simply ask that our existences not be invalidated on campus,” the letter says, catastrophizing.

From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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