By 1995, the suit was eventually modified, the cloak becoming a scalloped-edged cape and the gloves becoming gauntlets with three “fins” with claws embedded in the fingers for climbing. Famously drawn by the likes of Neal Adams and Jim Aparo, he eventually created a unique fire-retardant and chemical-resistant triple-weave Kevlar thread for the suit. The material had carbon nanotube fibers that imparted it with a unique sheen and made it heavily resistant to tearing. This material would go into the creation of all following bat-suits and other suits in the Bat Family. The most notable traits of this evolution were the incorporation of the yellow ellipse around the bat emblem as well as the capsule utility belt.
The items first appeared in the Very Scary Halloween Special event. They could be collected in the Eyeaduct map during the annual Haunted Halloween Special where a Haunted Halloween Gift would appear every five minutes on a server with 10 or more non-bot players. They were also available through the Mann Co. Store before November 8, 2011. Any gifts collected in the Underworld of Eyeaduct were awarded in the Haunted quality. Additionally, if the complete item set is worn, a special set effect could be applied.
From 1984 to 1988, Spider-Man wore a black costume with a white spider design on his chest. The new costume originated in the Secret Wars limited series, on an alien planet where Spider-Man participates in a battle between Earth's major superheroes and villains.[65] He continues wearing the costume when he returns, starting in The Amazing Spider-Man #252. The change to a longstanding character's design met with controversy, "with many hardcore comics fans decrying it as tantamount to sacrilege. Spider-Man's traditional red and blue costume was iconic, they argued, on par with those of his D.C. rivals Superman and Batman."[66] The creators then revealed the costume was an alien symbiote which Spider-Man is able to reject after a difficult struggle,[67] though the symbiote returns several times as Venom for revenge.[49]
The word Halloween or Hallowe'en dates to about 1745[31] and is of Christian origin.[32] The word "Hallowe'en" means "hallowed evening" or "holy evening".[33] It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows' Eve (the evening before All Hallows' Day).[34] In Scots, the word "eve" is even, and this is contracted to e'en or een. Over time, (All) Hallow(s) E(v)en evolved into Hallowe'en. Although the phrase "All Hallows'" is found in Old English "All Hallows' Eve" is itself not seen until 1556.[34][35]
The ideas of second-wave feminism, which spread through the 1960s into the 1970s, greatly influenced the way comic book companies would depict as well as market their female characters: Wonder Woman was for a time revamped as a mod-dressing martial artist directly inspired by the Emma Peel character from the British television series The Avengers (no relation to the superhero team of the same name),[29] but later reverted to Marston's original concept after the editors of Ms. magazine publicly disapproved of the character being depowered and without her traditional costume;[30] Supergirl was moved from being a secondary feature on Action Comics to headline Adventure Comics in 1969; the Lady Liberators appeared in an issue of The Avengers as a group of mind-controlled superheroines led by Valkyrie (actually a disguised supervillainess) and were meant to be a caricatured parody of feminist activists;[31] and Jean Grey became the embodiment of a cosmic being known as the Phoenix Force with seemingly unlimited power in the late 1970s, a stark contrast from her depiction as the weakest member of her team a decade ago.
The game consequently incorporates some elements introduced in seasons (S17 on, largely) that were created shortly before or after the release of the previous game, such as PC Principal and Classi, who both debuted in Season Nineteen, as well as Crunchy's Micro-Brew which debuted the same season, and the re-designed Skeeer's Wine Bar, although much of ShiTpaTown is still missing. The layout of the map has been changed to include other more South Park locations, such as the Peppermint Hippo strip club. The game's development also effected the show, as it was Senior Producer Jason Schroeder who brought Matt and Trey's attention to the fan art about Tweek and Craig that became the cataylist for the episode "Tweek x Craig", which in turn informed the game's development.
Follow Spider-Man’s action-packed journey, from his struggle to harness the extraordinary gifts that will prove to be both blessing and curse, to his fight to save innocent lives while the media tears him to pieces. It all leads up to his ultimate battle high above New York streets, against the death-dealing madman known as the Green Goblin. While the city watches helplessly and countless lives hang in the balance, Spider-Man confronts his archnemesis, and the Goblin puts Spider-Man’s vow to fight crime to the ultimate test...
Assigned as the sidekick of Captain Diabetes, the New Kid is forced to accompany him to infiltrate the Peppermint Hippo strip club and pose as a stripper in order to locate a woman with a penis tattoo, who may hold a clue to Scrambles' location... after questioning to wealthy regulars, and mixing up a fart-laden drink for the Peppermint Hippo DJ, they discover Classi is the woman in question. Chasing her to the back in pursuit, they are forced to battle many of the strippers, lead by Spontaneous Bootay, who aim to protect her.

The game's other key new feature is a crafting system - with just a few common items like water bottles and tortillas, you can get crafting valuable healing items in moments. Water bottles can be used to craft healing drinks, tortillas to craft Mexican food for stronger farts and healing, bits of fabric to create costumes, and junk to sell for more parts.

Peter Benjamin Parker is a photographer for the Daily Bugle newspaper under Editor-in-Chief Joe Robertson. Parker is also the friendly costumed hero Spider-Man. Spider-Man possesses the abilities of Earth arachnids, allowing him to fire thread-like projectiles from his wrists. These threads may be used to spin webs of near-limitless size, as well as to capture thieves and other assorted rogues in the selfsame manner as a spider entraps traditional insects. Those who wonder about his boundless strength would be advised to listen closely, as his spectacular might is the result of radioactive energy flowing through his very veins. The aforementioned web-like materials fired from his wrists can also be used as a means of swinging to and fro, meaning that those who wish to observe the Spider-Man in action can best do so by simply looking overhead. In addition, he is known to be primarily a nocturnal adventurer, appearing in the deep of night wherever evil is afoot. His alacrity is so great, his timing so amazing, he has been compared to a flash of light. Despite his best efforts and good intentions, it seems that his attempts at justice are often overlooked, and while other heroes may find celebrity and fortune, poor Parker is constantly in one hang-up or another. Regardless, the Spider-Man soldiers on; wherever there is a fight or ruckus or tussle, the Spider-Man can be found!
In an early recollection of the character's creation, Ditko described his and Lee's contributions in a mail interview with Gary Martin published in Comic Fan #2 (Summer 1965): "Stan Lee thought the name up. I did costume, web gimmick on wrist & spider signal."[23] At the time, Ditko shared a Manhattan studio with noted fetish artist Eric Stanton, an art-school classmate who, in a 1988 interview with Theakston, recalled that although his contribution to Spider-Man was "almost nil", he and Ditko had "worked on storyboards together and I added a few ideas. But the whole thing was created by Steve on his own... I think I added the business about the webs coming out of his hands."[20]:14

Spidey's next video game adventure was released on September 7th, 2010, in the form of Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions. In this game, you can play as four distinct Spider-Men in four different universes, in search of the shattered pieces of a legendary tablet. The game sometimes features sequences where the player is in first person and has to use the analog stick to win the fight, much like in some boxing games. The first dimension is the Amazing Universe (Earth 616), the world of regular comics Spider-Man that we know and love, voiced by Neil Patrick Harris. He uses mainly far-range combat to defeat his enemies, it is known he faces Sandman in this dimension. The second is the Noir Universe, which takes place in the 1940s, in a darker, stealthier, and grittier setting, where stealth and timing is crucial. In this dimension, Spider-Man Faces Hammerhead, Green Goblin and the Vulture. The third is 2099, taking place mostly in the skies, with many free falling levels. In this dimension, Spider-Man faces the Hobgoblin with a new, more advanced look. The final dimension is the Ultimate Universe, where Spider-Man has somehow been reunited with the Venom symbiote as his "gift" from Madame Webb. He battles Deadpool and many other bosses with symbiote tendrils and many more attacks. Carnage is the main boss of this dimension. In the end you battle a immensely empowered god-level Mysterio.
Spidercide later betrayed Jackal to Scrier (who was eventually revealed to be an operative of a cult of Scriers working with Norman Osborn). Scrier also removed Spidercide's clone degeneration factor and the Jackal was incapable of triggering his degeneration like he had done with fellow clone Jack. He was killed when falling off the Daily Bugle after it was revealed that the Jackal had deceived him. Although apparently dead, he was put into a stasis chamber as a precaution.[4]
Arcade Beetle Abner Jenkins Leila Davis Janice Lincoln Big Wheel Black Tarantula Boomerang Bullseye Calypso Carrion Clash Cyclone Demogoblin Doctor Doom Doppleganger Dracula Foreigner Gibbon Gog Grey Goblin Grim Hunter Grizzly Hippo Human Fly Hypno-Hustler Jack O' Lantern Jason Macendale Jigsaw Juggernaut Kangaroo Living Brain Lobo Brothers Looter Man-Wolf Kraven the Hunter (Ana Kravinoff) Kraven the Hunter (Alyosha Kravinoff) Lady Octopus Leap-Frog Magneto Man-Bull Massacre Mephisto Menace Mister Hyde Molten Man Morlun Nightmare Overdrive Owl Red Skull Ringer Scarecrow Scorcher Scorpia Scream Screwball Shathra Shriek Sin-Eater Speed Demon Spider Queen Spot Stegron Stilt-Man Styx and Stone Swarm Tarantula Taskmaster Trapster Phil Urich Vermin Walrus White Rabbit Will o' the Wisp

Jump up ^ Nicholas Rogers (2002). Halloween: From Pagan Ritual to Party Night. Oxford University Press. Archived from the original on 31 December 2014. Retrieved 31 October 2011. Halloween and the Day of the Dead share a common origin in the Christian commemoration of the dead on All Saints' and All Souls' Day. But both are thought to embody strong pre-Christian beliefs. In the case of Halloween, the Celtic celebration of Samhain is critical to its pagan legacy, a claim that has been foregrounded in recent years by both new-age enthusiasts and the evangelical Right.
After liberating the Power Stone from the Nova Corps on Xandar, Thanos and his adoptive children—Ebony Maw, Cull Obsidian, Proxima Midnight, and Corvus Glaive—invade the spaceship carrying the Asgardians who escaped the destruction Asgard in search of the Tesseract. Despite Thor, Loki, Heimdall and the Hulk's valiant attempts to thwart Thanos' invasion they are quickly defeated by the mad titan and his children with Loki dying in the process. After subduing the ship's defenders, Thanos claims the Tesseract for himself. After claiming the Tesseract, Thanos destroys his newly acquired prize revealing that he never actually wanted the Tesseract, but the Space Stone that powered the Tesseract. With his prize in hand, Thanos destroys the ship before continuing the search for the remaining Infinity Stones with his children. Unbeknownst to Thanos, Heimdall used the last of his strength to send the Hulk through the Bifröst to Earth before the ship's destruction, so that he might warn the Avengers of the threat Thanos posed.

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If your son is the type who’s eager to be all grown up so he can join the military or start a job, these occupation and military Halloween costumes are perfect for him. He can get to “work” collecting candy dressed up as a doctor in scrubs, a Wild West sheriff or a scientist in a lab coat. If he always stops to stare at construction sites, he’ll adore The Builder costume. These costumes, which include a police officer and fireman, will help make him feel like a grownup for a day while still getting to enjoy the kid fun of trick or treating.
Almost all the characters listed first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man with the exception of Kaine and Humbug first appearing in Web of Spider-Man. The Prowler is the oldest character appearing in The Amazing Spider-Man in the 1960s in the Silver Age. Many other anti-heroes were introduced in the 1970s in between the Silver Age and the Bronze Age while Humbug was introduced in the 1980s right around the start of the Modern Age. Kaine is the youngest debuted character while Cardiac is the second youngest. Both Kaine and Cardiac appeared around the 1990s.
At Yale, every residential college has a “master”––a professor who lives in residence with their family, and is responsible for its academic, intellectual, and social life.  “Masters work with students to shape each residential college community,” Yale states, “bringing their own distinct social, cultural, and intellectual influences to the colleges.” The approach is far costlier than what’s on offer at commuter schools, but aims to create a richer intellectual environment where undergrads can learn from faculty and one another even outside the classroom.
This distraction was all the Vulture needed to equip his suit and began attacking Spider-Man and the FBI. While Spider-Man saved the agents from the arms dealer's attacks, Vulture freed his men and urged them to escape. Another fierce fight ensued between the Vulture and Spider-Man, who used his Web-Shooters' combinations to enhance his fighting ability against the winged menace.
Bob mentioned the epic Ramayana, which is itself the story of a “superhero” — the god Rama, who does some pretty nifty stunts, along with his brother Lakshama and monkey hero side-kick Hanuman (my personal favorite). I think he’s probably right about Asia being the earliest origins of superheroism; Hinduism is one of the world’s oldest religions and it’s full of larger-than-life men/gods who right wrongs and fight for truth and justice.

The Batsuit is the costume Batman wears to conceal his identity and to frighten criminals. Unable to create it by himself, Bruce Wayne needed Lucius Fox to provide him some sort of armor. Fox presented him a prototype armor suit that was rejected by the army due to cost. After receiving the suit, Bruce sprays it with black rubber and adds a bat symbol.
Outside of the mainstream universe, there are different incarnations of Spider-Man in alternate universes such as the Ultimate universe version. Originally, these characters were depicted as separate from each other, but they have crossed over together in Spider-Verse, where the many versions of Spider-Men are the major protagonists of the storyline. Some of these characters were later merged in the same universe in the 2015 comic book series Secret Wars as a part of the Spider-Man family.
Designated as Earth 30847, not much of this Spider-Man is different from traditional itterations, except for the fact that the universe is shared by Capcom characters. This universe does not have a concrete lore, but the main plot of Marvel Vs. Capcom does feature Spider-Man contributing to the battle against Ultron Sigma, a fusion of Ultron and Sigma from the Mega Man X series.
The Beyonder transported Spider-Man along with other heroes and villains to Battleworld to take place in the Secret Wars, an intergalactic battle between the world’s greatest heroes and villains. During the battle, Spider-Man’s suit was badly damaged and he needed a new one. Peter came upon a strange machine that produced a black substance which slithered over him and covered his entire body. This new black and white costume, similar to Arachne's costume, replaced his old costume. Once the heroes won the battle, they were all transported back to Earth and Spider-Man kept on wearing the suit because it enhanced his strength, speed, and agility. He would start experiencing odd signs of fatigue and became even more concerned when he discovered that the suit produced organic webbing. He took the suit to Reed Richards who told him that it's actually a living alien symbiote, which can only survive by bonding to a host and draining their life-force away. Reed used a sonic emitter to separate Peter from the suit. Spider-Man was now without a costume and Johnny Storm, as part of a practical joke, gave Peter an old Fantastic Four costume with a paper bag for a mask and dubbed him the Bombastic Bag-Man. Admiring the black suit's design, Spider-Man's then-girlfriend and crime-fighting partner the Black Cat made him a cloth version of the black costume which he would start using for a time. The symbiote made its way back to Peter and attempted to permanently bond with him, but Peter used the sounds of a church bell to seemingly destroy the suit. It survived and found a host in Eddie Brock to become one of Spider-Man's deadliest and most recurring foes, Venom.
In Python, the datetime module contains examples of attributes. A datetime object has several pieces of information associated with it that a user can extract. For example, to get the day from the datetime object, a user could call datetime.day and to get the year, the user could call datetime.year and so on. The day and the year are attributes of a datetime object.
The modern imagery of Halloween comes from many sources, including Christian eschatology, national customs, works of Gothic and horror literature (such as the novels Frankenstein and Dracula) and classic horror films (such as Frankenstein and The Mummy).[128][129] Imagery of the skull, a reference to Golgotha in the Christian tradition, serves as "a reminder of death and the transitory quality of human life" and is consequently found in memento mori and vanitas compositions;[130] skulls have therefore been commonplace in Halloween, which touches on this theme.[131] Traditionally, the back walls of churches are "decorated with a depiction of the Last Judgment, complete with graves opening and the dead rising, with a heaven filled with angels and a hell filled with devils", a motif that has permeated the observance of this triduum.[132] One of the earliest works on the subject of Halloween is from Scottish poet John Mayne, who, in 1780, made note of pranks at Halloween; "What fearfu' pranks ensue!", as well as the supernatural associated with the night, "Bogies" (ghosts), influencing Robert Burns' "Halloween" (1785).[133] Elements of the autumn season, such as pumpkins, corn husks, and scarecrows, are also prevalent. Homes are often decorated with these types of symbols around Halloween. Halloween imagery includes themes of death, evil, and mythical monsters.[134] Black, orange, and sometimes purple are Halloween's traditional colors.
Comic-book companies were in the early stages of cultural expansion and many of these characters played to specific stereotypes; Cage and many of his contemporaries often employed lingo similar to that of blaxploitation films, Native Americans were often associated with shamanism and wild animals, and Asian Americans were often portrayed as kung fu martial artists. Subsequent minority heroes, such as the X-Men's Storm and the Teen Titans' Cyborg avoided such conventions; they were both part of ensemble teams, which became increasingly diverse in subsequent years. The X-Men, in particular, were revived in 1975 with a line-up of characters culled from several nations, including the Kenyan Storm, German Nightcrawler, Russian Colossus, Irish Banshee, and Japanese Sunfire. In 1993, Milestone Comics, an African-American-owned media/publishing company entered into a publishing agreement with DC Comics that allowed them to introduce a line of comics that included characters of many ethnic minorities. Milestone's initial run lasted four years, during which it introduced Static, a character adapted into the WB Network animated series Static Shock.
On Earth-3123, Aunt May was bitten by the radioactive spider instead of Peter, and takes the identity of Spider-Ma'am. She and her family are confronted by Karn. Sensing that he's too strong for her, she proposes to offer her life for the sake of her family, causing Karn to hesitate for a moment (because she reminded him of his mother). Before Karn tries to kill her, the other Spider Totems intervene and convince him to join them in their fight against the Inheritors.[80]
Unseen scientist Mister Fantastic constructed large, transforming battle armour for various superhumans; Spider-Man received two, one based on each of his costumes, both of which could transform into a high-speed motorcycle. It is likely Richards gained the idea from Spider-Man, as it is inconceivable the encounter with the Transformers wouldn't have a lasting impact on the vigilante.[1]
Bob mentioned the epic Ramayana, which is itself the story of a “superhero” — the god Rama, who does some pretty nifty stunts, along with his brother Lakshama and monkey hero side-kick Hanuman (my personal favorite). I think he’s probably right about Asia being the earliest origins of superheroism; Hinduism is one of the world’s oldest religions and it’s full of larger-than-life men/gods who right wrongs and fight for truth and justice.
Zapp Brannigan. Always ready to step in and save the day...or just get in the way of the beloved crew of the Planet Express. If you'd like to go as this memorable Futurama character, look no further than our authentic Zapp costume. Styled as a tunic and wig with gloves and boots, it will turn any man into a brave 25 star general. A popular choice for any guy who's a fan of Matt Groening!
The modern imagery of Halloween comes from many sources, including Christian eschatology, national customs, works of Gothic and horror literature (such as the novels Frankenstein and Dracula) and classic horror films (such as Frankenstein and The Mummy).[128][129] Imagery of the skull, a reference to Golgotha in the Christian tradition, serves as "a reminder of death and the transitory quality of human life" and is consequently found in memento mori and vanitas compositions;[130] skulls have therefore been commonplace in Halloween, which touches on this theme.[131] Traditionally, the back walls of churches are "decorated with a depiction of the Last Judgment, complete with graves opening and the dead rising, with a heaven filled with angels and a hell filled with devils", a motif that has permeated the observance of this triduum.[132] One of the earliest works on the subject of Halloween is from Scottish poet John Mayne, who, in 1780, made note of pranks at Halloween; "What fearfu' pranks ensue!", as well as the supernatural associated with the night, "Bogies" (ghosts), influencing Robert Burns' "Halloween" (1785).[133] Elements of the autumn season, such as pumpkins, corn husks, and scarecrows, are also prevalent. Homes are often decorated with these types of symbols around Halloween. Halloween imagery includes themes of death, evil, and mythical monsters.[134] Black, orange, and sometimes purple are Halloween's traditional colors.
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