furthermore, to my knowledge Superman did not at all debut in 1928 but rather in 1938. Detective Comics (the U.S.A.’s first widely distributed super-hero comic book printing house) started up with Batman in 1935, though this may have been in response to numerous small press releases of other Batman-ish books like The Phantom and other detective pulp in the couple of years previous.
As students saw it, their pain ought to have been the decisive factor in determining the acceptability of the Halloween email. They thought their request for an apology ought to have been sufficient to secure one. Who taught them that it is righteous to pillory faculty for failing to validate their feelings, as if disagreement is tantamount to disrespect? Their mindset is anti-diversity, anti-pluralism, and anti-tolerance, a seeming data-point in favor of April Kelly-Woessner’s provocative argument that “young people today are less politically tolerant than their parents’ generation.”
Flash Thompson[106] Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962) A sometimes enemy of Peter Parker instead of Spider-Man. Flash's most common depiction is a high school bully of Parker commonly dubbing him "Puny Parker". Despite how he treats Parker he happens to be one of Spider-Man's biggest fans. Later on Flash would be depicted as being good friends to Peter instead. In The Amazing Spider-Man #654, Flash Thompson becomes "Agent Venom"[107]
^ Jump up to: a b c Cowsill, Alan; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1990s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 197. ISBN 978-0756692360. Artist Mark Bagley's era of The Amazing Spider-Man hit its stride as Carnage revealed the true face of his evil. Carnage was a symbiotic offspring produced when Venom bonded to psychopath Cletus Kasady."
Captain America and Iron Man have no trouble teaming up to save the day, but as we found out in Captain America Civil War , sometimes they find themselves at odds, too. When the threat to humanity is real though, Captain Steve Rogers and billionaire Tony Stark are sure to set aside their differences and suit up to defeat the bad guys. The only question is, are your children ready to do the same? Will they pass muster when they put on their hero costume? Let’s find out by decking them out in one of these red hot Avengers costumes. When Iron Man and Cap hit the scene, they’ll be ready to recreate all of their favorite action sequences. With the Captain boldly holding his shield, and Iron Man ready to fire his repulsor blasts at the baddies, these two are suited and ready. Have them stand in this pose for a really great photo!

Eerder dit jaar zeiden we het al: het chatbot-tijdperk neemt een vlucht in 2018. De typische vraag-antwoord-bots kennen we inmiddels allemaal. Maar de vraag is waar de kansen van AI liggen bij ‘complex’ klantcontact, bijvoorbeeld in geval van een klacht, technisch support of voor aankoopadvies. Consumenten willen veelal goed, snel en persoonlijk geholpen worden, maar welke rol...
Angered at Spider-Man ruining his plans again, Mysterio activates a robotic avatar and sends it after Peter. Back in the new universe, Peter fights with the other Spider-Man, but his superior experience and training is outmaneuvered by the other Spider-Man's new powers, culminating in Peter being knocked out when the other Spider-Man, Miles Morales uses his venom sting on a web that Peter had just created. Waking up in a cell, Peter meets this world's Nick Fury and explains his theory that he is from another universe, which Fury accepts as nobody would come up with something that ridiculous as a lie. Fury sends Peter away with Miles to explain this world's history to him. But just as Peter asks Miles if his counterpart is dead in this world, they are attacked by Mysterio's avatar.[4]
In 1962, with the success of the Fantastic Four, Marvel Comics editor and head writer Stan Lee was casting about for a new superhero idea. He said the idea for Spider-Man arose from a surge in teenage demand for comic books, and the desire to create a character with whom teens could identify.[16]:1 In his autobiography, Lee cites the non-superhuman pulp magazine crime fighter the Spider as a great influence,[15]:130 and in a multitude of print and video interviews, Lee stated he was further inspired by seeing a spider climb up a wall—adding in his autobiography that he has told that story so often he has become unsure of whether or not this is true.[note 1] Although at the time teenage superheroes were usually given names ending with "boy", Lee says he chose "Spider-Man" because he wanted the character to age as the series progressed, and moreover felt the name "Spider-Boy" would have made the character sound inferior to other superheroes.[17] At that time Lee had to get only the consent of Marvel publisher Martin Goodman for the character's approval. In a 1986 interview, Lee described in detail his arguments to overcome Goodman's objections.[note 2] Goodman eventually agreed to a Spider-Man tryout in what Lee in numerous interviews recalled as what would be the final issue of the science-fiction and supernatural anthology series Amazing Adult Fantasy, which was renamed Amazing Fantasy for that single issue, #15 (cover-dated August 1962, on sale June 5, 1962).[18] In particular, Lee stated that the fact that it had already been decided that Amazing Fantasy would be cancelled after issue #15 was the only reason Goodman allowed him to use Spider-Man.[17] While this was indeed the final issue, its editorial page anticipated the comic continuing and that "The Spiderman [sic] ... will appear every month in Amazing."[18][19]
Jump up ^ "BBC – Religions – Christianity: All Hallows' Eve". British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). 2010. Archived from the original on 3 November 2011. Retrieved 1 November 2011. All Hallows' Eve falls on 31st October each year, and is the day before All Hallows' Day, also known as All Saints' Day in the Christian calendar. The Church traditionally held a vigil on All Hallows' Eve when worshippers would prepare themselves with prayers and fasting prior to the feast day itself.

Spider-Man Noir appears in Ultimate Spider-Man, voiced by Milo Ventimiglia. In the episode "The Spider-Verse: Part 2", after Green Goblin appears on the Noir reality to collect the DNA of that universe Spider-Man, he is confronted by both the "Noir" and the "Ultimate" Spider-Man, who had followed the Goblin to this universe. However, after rejecting an alliance proposed by his counterpart, Noir is forced to work together with him after the Green Goblin hijacks an airship to draw out Spider-Man Noir, taking a group of civilians present hostage, including Mary Jane. While the Ultimate Spider-Man is saving the hostages, Spider-Man Noir fights the Goblin on his own, but the Goblin manage to take the DNA of a distracted Spider-Man Noir and then departs. Spider-Man Noir admits to both Ultimate Spider-Man and Mary Jane that he should drop the "lone wolf" act, and as his counterpart follows the Goblin to another dimension, the two Spider-Men depart as friends. Spider-Man Noir later returns In "The Spider-Verse: Part 4", summoned by "Ultimate" Spider-Man along with other Spider-Man counterparts to form a team known as the Web-Warriors in order to combat the Green Goblin and Electro. After the villains are defeated, the Web-Warriors return to their respective dimensions. Spider-Man Noir makes a cameo in the fourth season episode "Miles from Home".
furthermore, to my knowledge Superman did not at all debut in 1928 but rather in 1938. Detective Comics (the U.S.A.’s first widely distributed super-hero comic book printing house) started up with Batman in 1935, though this may have been in response to numerous small press releases of other Batman-ish books like The Phantom and other detective pulp in the couple of years previous.
As one contemporaneous journalist observed, "Spider-Man has a terrible identity problem, a marked inferiority complex, and a fear of women. He is anti-social, [sic] castration-ridden, racked with Oedipal guilt, and accident-prone ... [a] functioning neurotic".[44] Agonizing over his choices, always attempting to do right, he is nonetheless viewed with suspicion by the authorities, who seem unsure as to whether he is a helpful vigilante or a clever criminal.[85]

In 1962, Marvel Comics editor and head writer Stan Lee was looking for a new superhero idea. He decided to create Spider-Man as a character with whom teens could identify, as there was a recent surge in teenage demand for comics. Lee was supposedly inspired for the concept of Spider-Man after observing a spider climb up a wall. Lee had to convince publisher Martin Goodman to introduce Spider-Man in the last issue of the canceled series Amazing Adult Fantasy, which was renamed Amazing Fantasy for that issue (#15, Aug. 1962). Lee then approached legendary artist Jack Kirby for an initial character design. However Lee was dissatisfied with Kirby’s attempt as the character turned out to be too heroic and Spider-Man was supposed to be a teenage boy. Lee then turned to Steve Ditko who developed the now iconic look of Spider-Man.
In 1972, a second monthly ongoing series starring Spider-Man began: Marvel Team-Up, in which Spider-Man was paired with other superheroes and villains.[31] From that point on there have generally been at least two ongoing Spider-Man series at any time. In 1976, his second solo series, Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man began running parallel to the main series.[32] A third series featuring Spider-Man, Web of Spider-Man, launched in 1985 to replace Marvel Team-Up.[33] The launch of a fourth monthly title in 1990, the "adjectiveless" Spider-Man (with the storyline "Torment"), written and drawn by popular artist Todd McFarlane, debuted with several different covers, all with the same interior content. The various versions combined sold over 3 million copies, an industry record at the time. Several limited series, one-shots, and loosely related comics have also been published, and Spider-Man makes frequent cameos and guest appearances in other comic series.[32][34] In 1996 The Sensational Spider-Man was created to replace Web of Spider-Man.[35]
In order to censor the Daily Bugle, Osborn kidnaps the editor J. Jonah Jameson and has the Chameleon assume his place. The Chameleon-as-Jameson goes to Urich’s apartment and shoots him, unaware that Felicia witnessed the murder. Hardy goes to the Daily Bugle offices and kills the Chameleon, leaving his body to be discovered by Spider-Man shortly before the arrival of the police.[3] Spider-Man escapes the attentions of the police and goes to his home, where he killed the Vulture, in order to stop him from murdering Aunt Parker. Despite saving his aunt, May criticized him for killing the Vulture, as he could have stopped him with his powers. She told Peter that killing people would make him less of what makes him human.[4]
Another Silliman resident declared in a campus publication, “I have had to watch my friends defend their right to this institution. This email and the subsequent reaction to it have interrupted their lives. I have friends who are not going to class, who are not doing their homework, who are losing sleep, who are skipping meals, and who are having breakdowns.” One feels for these students. But if an email about Halloween costumes has them skipping class and suffering breakdowns, either they need help from mental-health professionals or they’ve been grievously ill-served by debilitating ideological notions they’ve acquired about what ought to cause them pain.
** "Weak" enemies are enemies with less than 20 defense, 40 damage and up to 5  of loot. These will be mostly pre hardmode enemies. When playing in expert mode all enemies are much stronger and therefore these conditions limit the amount of enemies that can drop the Bloody Machete and Bladed Glove to just a couple, especially during hardmode. See the table below for clarication.
In the "House of M", a Marvel crossover, the Scarlet Witch alters reality to make mutants the ruling class over humans. This world is ruled by mutants and their leader, Magneto. In the mini-series Spider-Man: House of M, Peter Parker is believed to be a mutant, and Spider-Man's identity is widely known. He is rich, famous and married to Gwen Stacy, and they have a young son named Ritchie. Aunt May and Uncle Ben are alive and in good health, and J. Jonah Jameson is Peter's often-abused publicist. Unfortunately, his life unravels when Jameson reveals to the world that Spider-Man is not a born mutant. After the world is restored to normal, Peter suffers terribly with the memory of the life he left behind, expressing a desire to kill Magneto, whom he mistakenly believes was behind the events of House of M, and the Scarlet Witch, whose powers were responsible for the altered reality.[6] This version is later killed by Karn during the Spider-Verse event.[7]
Spider-Men is a five-issue, 2012 superhero comic book miniseries published by Marvel Comics, featuring Peter Parker, the original Spider-Man, and Miles Morales, the second and current Ultimate Marvel version of Spider-Man, who appear together in a crossover storyline that involves the two alternate universes from which they each originate. The series is written by Brian Michael Bendis and illustrated by Sara Pichelli.[1][2] It marks the first time that characters from the original Marvel Universe and the Ultimate Universe have crossed over since the latter debuted in 2000.

Peter's first super-villain confrontation was with a communist spy called the Chameleon who could disguise himself as anyone. He attempted to disguise himself as Spider-Man and steal some important documents but he was defeated by the debuting hero, restoring his good name. Peter went on to get a job at the Daily Bugle as a photographer, selling photos to J. Jonah Jameson even though they were usually used against him. He eventually fought his second super villain, The Vulture. Due to his inexperience, Spider-Man was defeated but when the villain got cocky, Spider-Man used a gadget of his own to defeat The Vulture. Spider-Man then had his first confrontation with his most dangerous villain yet, the tentacled madman known as Doctor Octopus. Spider-Man was defeated by the more powerful Doctor Octopus in their initial encounter which caused Peter to doubt himself for the first time. He was encouraged by a speech given by the Human Torch to keep on fighting. Spider-Man managed to defeat the villain by knocking him out with one punch to the jaw, since Ock's powers came only from his tentacles. He would follow up this victory by fighting the shape shifting Sandman, the lethal Lizard, who is actually Peter's mentor and friend Curt Connors, the Enforcers, Electro, Mysterio, Kraven the Hunter, Doctor Doom, and his soon to-be arch-nemesis the Green Goblin.
In a controversial storyline, Peter becomes convinced that Ben Reilly, the Scarlet Spider (a clone of Peter created by his college professor Miles Warren) is the real Peter Parker, and that he, Peter, is the clone. Peter gives up the Spider-Man identity to Reilly for a time, until Reilly is killed by the returning Green Goblin and revealed to be the clone after all.[71] In stories published in 2005 and 2006 (such as "The Other"), he develops additional spider-like abilities including biological web-shooters, toxic stingers that extend from his forearms, the ability to stick individuals to his back, enhanced Spider-sense and night vision, and increased strength and speed. Peter later becomes a member of the New Avengers, and reveals his civilian identity to the world,[72] increasing his already numerous problems. His marriage to Mary Jane and public unmasking are later erased in another controversial[73] storyline "One More Day", in a Faustian bargain with the demon Mephisto that results in several other adjustments to the timeline, including the resurrection of Harry Osborn and the return of Spider-Man's traditional tools and powers.[74]
Jump up ^ Bannatyne, Lesley Pratt (1 August 1998). Halloween: An American Holiday, an American History. Pelican Publishing. p. 12. ISBN 1565543467. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 1 November 2012. Polish Catholics taught their children to pray out loud as they walked through the woods so that the souls of the dead could hear them and be comforted. Priests in tiny Spanish villages still ring their church bells to remind parishioners to honor the dead on All Hallows Eve.
These are not mere mortals but they are blessed with divine gifts. They were often agents of change bringing culture, social change or advancement to a civilization. Their stories were more than just historical lessons - there was an element of religion and cult worship. I would argue that they are part of the archetype of the superhero - even if they are foreign to our current definition.
And these aren't your dad's costumes. Anything you want to be, we have a costume for it. If you want to be a paladin, slashing his way through dungeons to save a princess, we've got a knight costume you need to see. If you're the kind of guy who can recite every Ben Stiller line from Zoolander, we've got that one too. If you're the type of guy who just needs that Raggedy Andy costume to make your girl happy for that couples costume she's been dying to wear with you, we can do you a solid. (It's cool, we've been there too). Whatever kind of guy you are and whatever kind of men's costume you need, you're going to find it here.

In order to censor the Daily Bugle, Osborn kidnaps the editor J. Jonah Jameson and has the Chameleon assume his place. The Chameleon-as-Jameson goes to Urich’s apartment and shoots him, unaware that Felicia witnessed the murder. Hardy goes to the Daily Bugle offices and kills the Chameleon, leaving his body to be discovered by Spider-Man shortly before the arrival of the police.[3] Spider-Man escapes the attentions of the police and goes to his home, where he killed the Vulture, in order to stop him from murdering Aunt Parker. Despite saving his aunt, May criticized him for killing the Vulture, as he could have stopped him with his powers. She told Peter that killing people would make him less of what makes him human.[4]
Character hoodies are perhaps our favorite quick-and-easy costume, because they work for a great everyday geek fashion too! This Yoda hoodie will instantly transform you into a Dagobah dwelling Jedi. People might be expecting a Yoda voice when you go in this sweatshirt though, so do your best to practice your gravelly tone and work on flipping around the words in your sentences!
"Costume" often refers to a particular style of clothing worn to portray the wearer as a character or type of character at a social event in a theatrical performance on the stage or in film or television. In combination with other aspects of stagecraft, theatrical costumes can help actors portray characters' and their contexts as well as communicate information about the historical period/era, geographic location and time of day, season or weather of the theatrical performance. Some stylized theatrical costumes, such as Harlequin and Pantaloon in the Commedia dell'arte, exaggerate an aspect of a character.

Robert Downey, Jr., Josh Brolin, Mark Ruffalo, Tom Hiddleston, Chris Hemsworth, Chris Evans, Chris Pratt, Elizabeth Olsen, Zoe Saldana, Karen Gillan, Sebastian Stan, Benedict Cumberbatch, Benedict Wong, Tom Holland, Paul Bettany, Vin Diesel, Terry Notary, Dave Bautista, Bradley Cooper, Sean Gunn, Pom Klementieff, Benicio del Toro, Anthony Mackie, Scarlett Johansson, Chadwick Boseman, Danai Gurira, Don Cheadle, Tom Vaughan-Lawlor, Letitia Wright, Winston Duke, Cobie Smulders, Gwyneth Paltrow , Ethan Dizon, Tiffany Espensen, Jacob Batalon, Isabella Amara, Florence Kasumba, Terry Notary, Carrie Coon, Michael James Shaw, Peter Dinklage, Idris Elba, William Hurt, Samuel L. Jackson, Kerry Condon, Ross Marquand, Stan Lee, Stephen McFeely
Born to Richard and Mary Parker in Queens, New York, Peter Parker lost his parents at a very young age when their plane went down overseas while they were on a mission as government spies. He was raised by his aunt and uncle (May and Ben Parker) who, along with his teachers at Midtown High School, thought he had a bright future due to his affinity for science. However, Peter struggled with bullies and being teased for his introverted nature (sometimes referring to him as a "professional wallflower") and interest in science that pegged him as a teacher's pet.
When they finally reach the base, Chameleon reveals himself as being disguised as Ezekiel the entire time. Spider-man then gets ambushed and killed by the Kravinoff's. With Kraven finally back from the dead, he shows his anger at Sasha by confirming that the blood was not that of the real Spider-Man but of his clone Kaine. When Peter awakens, he finds Kaine's body in a coffin with a note reading "Hunt me" and his black costume lying beside the coffin. Spider-Man begins to hunt the Kravinoff's one by one, first taking out Chameleon and nearly killing Vladimir with a giant tombstone before dodging a point-blank shot from Alyosha's rifle. Spider-man than appears on the roof of the mansion and attacks Sasha, leaving the mark of Kaine on her face (using his finger's abilities to rip the skin off of her face) in revenge for the death of his clone and "brother". Spider-Man and Kraven then proceed to engage into battle and the fight proves to be completely one-sided as Peter goes all out with the intentions of killing Kraven for the murders of his friends. As he is about to deliver the killing blow to Kraven with his own spear, Arachne (As the new Madame Web) appears and shows Spider-man a grim future that would follow if he decided to murder Kraven. Spider-Man lets Kraven live and tells him that it's his second and last chance to live.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 72. ISBN 978-0756692360. Writer Gerry Conway and artist Ross Andru introduced two major new characters to Spider-Man's world and the Marvel Universe in this self-contained issue. Not only would the vigilante known as the Punisher go on to be one of the most important and iconic Marvel creations of the 1970s, but his instigator, the Jackal, would become the next big threat in Spider-Man's life.

When night falls in South Park, Cartman takes up the call and dons the Coon costume. This fearless crime fighter is the only one who can sort through the trash can of society. As the founder of Coon and Friends, the Coon is the mastermind behind the greatest superhero franchise of all time and will stop at nothing to see it realized. Thinks Eric Cartman is handsome and cool.
Remember Alf? He's back! For any guy old enough to remember the 80s, watching the hilarious alien, Alf, series is sure to be a fond memory. Try your turn as the TV character when you go in this HalloweenCostumes.com exclusive costume for men. Whether reliving your favorite moments or just looking for a fun throwback look, the furry plush jumpsuit and oversized character mask will turn any human into the lovable alien from Melmac!

Spider-Man Noir appears as a playable character in Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions, voiced by Christopher Daniel Barnes. His reality is one of four alternate dimensions that is seeded by pieces of the Tablet of Order and Chaos.[15] Spider-Man Noir can blend into the shadows to do sneak attacks on enemies. After the defeats of the Noir versions of Hammerhead, Vulture and Green Goblin, and claims his tablet fragments, he, together with the other three Spider-Men, is teleported to their location by Madame Web to fight Mysterio, who had absorbed the Tablet and effectively became a god. After the defeat of Mysterio, the Noir and other Spider-Men return to their own realities.


Quick background on me: I'm a leading admin on four different wikis (including Final Fantasy Wiki and Ratchet & Clank Wiki), and have been editing dozens of wikis for almost ten years now. As I'm a huge fan of Insomniac Games, and really excited for Marvel's Spider-Man on PS4, I decided to apply the skills I built over the years, along with my friend u/Jak_Himself (from the Jak and Daxter Wiki), to develop what will hopefully be the official wiki for the upcoming game!

Molecular Structure: One power Spidercide has that Spider-Man doesn't is complete control over his body on a molecular level. For example, he can extend his limbs or his body itself in a somewhat similar way to Mister Fantastic. He can shapeshift his form & appearance. He can also control the density of his bodily tissues, making him much more resistant to all forms of physical injury than he normally is enabling him to withstand even greater impact forces, falls from great heights, and high caliber bullets. He has also been known to transform his fists into various objects, turn himself partially or fully into liquid, & to simulate the type of artificial webbing that Spider-Man once used. Among other things.
Jump up ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 24. ISBN 978-0756692360. While never reaching the popularity of previous [Stan] Lee and [Steve] Ditko collaborations, the Enforcers managed to give the wall-crawler a run for his money in their first appearance.
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Beneath the rubble, Parker called for help and writhed in pain, but he noticed an image of his mask in the water and his own reflection. Remembering Stark's words, Parker finally understood what his mentor meant about separating his identity from his suit: with or without the suit, he was Spider-Man. Spider-Man regained his resolve and pushed the rubble off his back, and he continued his pursuit of the Vulture.[2]
Captain Universe generally possesses superhuman strength, flight, Uni-Vision (microscopic vision, X-ray vision, and telescopic vision), telekinesis, enhanced senses, and a psychic awareness of imminent danger; when a person already possessing one or more of these abilities was transformed into Captain Universe, those abilities were amplified by vast amounts. Some manifestations of the Uni-Power have demonstrated other, less common abilities as well as failing to exhibit some of the more 'usual' powers, which vary in intensity with each wielder according to the strength and imagination of each. Captain Universe usually possesses the ability of molecular rearrangement of organic and inorganic matter, transmutation of elements, the ability to fire bursts of energy and concussive force, and hypnosis (using the Uni-Vision energy). Possessing its own sentience, the Uni-Power can and will abandon a host if necessary, or if said host uses or intends to use the granted abilities in a detrimental or criminal fashion.

Trick-or-treating is a customary celebration for children on Halloween. Children go in costume from house to house, asking for treats such as candy or sometimes money, with the question, "Trick or treat?" The word "trick" implies a "threat" to perform mischief on the homeowners or their property if no treat is given.[84] The practice is said to have roots in the medieval practice of mumming, which is closely related to souling.[135] John Pymm writes that "many of the feast days associated with the presentation of mumming plays were celebrated by the Christian Church."[136] These feast days included All Hallows' Eve, Christmas, Twelfth Night and Shrove Tuesday.[137][138] Mumming practiced in Germany, Scandinavia and other parts of Europe,[139] involved masked persons in fancy dress who "paraded the streets and entered houses to dance or play dice in silence".[140]

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