In the Larval Zooniverse, Peter Porker (who was secretly the superhero Spider-Ham) was working on an experiment that went awry and bestowed upon him the cosmic power of Captain Zooniverse. With this new power he defeated all of his enemies and trapped them in orbit around Earth. He returned home a bit later and began a new villain-free life with his girlfriend Mary Jane Waterbuffalo.[27]
It begins with an orphan named Peter Parker, raised by his beloved Aunt May and Uncle Ben in Queens, New York. A quiet student, he works diligently at his studies and pines for the beautiful Mary Jane Watson. But this ordinary teenage boy is about to have his life turned upside down, when he is bitten by a genetically altered spider. Suddenly, he finds himself possessed of spectacular powers. He is now and forever Spider-Man!
If you've got an epic horseshoe mustache and the long sideburns to match, or are just willing to trim your black beard into a killer style, then there's only one character for you. Jules Winnfield from Pulp Fiction! This sharp tongued (but well dressed) man might recite a bible verse before he fulfills his contract, but we think you'll be a hot shot no matter what you say when you go in this iconic suit. Officially licensed, this suit is designed straight from the movie, and is the easiest way to portray the iconic Tarantino character and his sweet facial hair!
The Beyonder transported Spider-Man along with other heroes and villains to Battleworld to take place in the Secret Wars, an intergalactic battle between the world’s greatest heroes and villains. During the battle, Spider-Man’s suit was badly damaged and he needed a new one. Peter came upon a strange machine that produced a black substance which slithered over him and covered his entire body. This new black and white costume, similar to Arachne's costume, replaced his old costume. Once the heroes won the battle, they were all transported back to Earth and Spider-Man kept on wearing the suit because it enhanced his strength, speed, and agility. He would start experiencing odd signs of fatigue and became even more concerned when he discovered that the suit produced organic webbing. He took the suit to Reed Richards who told him that it's actually a living alien symbiote, which can only survive by bonding to a host and draining their life-force away. Reed used a sonic emitter to separate Peter from the suit. Spider-Man was now without a costume and Johnny Storm, as part of a practical joke, gave Peter an old Fantastic Four costume with a paper bag for a mask and dubbed him the Bombastic Bag-Man. Admiring the black suit's design, Spider-Man's then-girlfriend and crime-fighting partner the Black Cat made him a cloth version of the black costume which he would start using for a time. The symbiote made its way back to Peter and attempted to permanently bond with him, but Peter used the sounds of a church bell to seemingly destroy the suit. It survived and found a host in Eddie Brock to become one of Spider-Man's deadliest and most recurring foes, Venom.

In addition to the suit's continuous evolution, Batman keeps variant costumes for dealing with extraordinary situations; for example, he has been shown in a Scuba variant of his costume, a fireproof version for fighting his enemy Firefly, a thermally insulated version for fighting Mr. Freeze, as well as others. Many versions of the hero show him swapping his cloth costume for a suit of powered armor.
The ideas of second-wave feminism, which spread through the 1960s into the 1970s, greatly influenced the way comic book companies would depict as well as market their female characters: Wonder Woman was for a time revamped as a mod-dressing martial artist directly inspired by the Emma Peel character from the British television series The Avengers (no relation to the superhero team of the same name),[29] but later reverted to Marston's original concept after the editors of Ms. magazine publicly disapproved of the character being depowered and without her traditional costume;[30] Supergirl was moved from being a secondary feature on Action Comics to headline Adventure Comics in 1969; the Lady Liberators appeared in an issue of The Avengers as a group of mind-controlled superheroines led by Valkyrie (actually a disguised supervillainess) and were meant to be a caricatured parody of feminist activists;[31] and Jean Grey became the embodiment of a cosmic being known as the Phoenix Force with seemingly unlimited power in the late 1970s, a stark contrast from her depiction as the weakest member of her team a decade ago.
Flash Thompson[106] Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962) A sometimes enemy of Peter Parker instead of Spider-Man. Flash's most common depiction is a high school bully of Parker commonly dubbing him "Puny Parker". Despite how he treats Parker he happens to be one of Spider-Man's biggest fans. Later on Flash would be depicted as being good friends to Peter instead. In The Amazing Spider-Man #654, Flash Thompson becomes "Agent Venom"[107]

^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 40. ISBN 978-0756692360. Although he made his debut in the previous issue, it was in this [Stan] Lee and [John] Romita tale [The Amazing Spider-Man #51] that the Kingpin – real name Wilson Fisk – really left his mark on organized crime.


^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 72. ISBN 978-0756692360. Writer Gerry Conway and artist Ross Andru introduced two major new characters to Spider-Man's world and the Marvel Universe in this self-contained issue. Not only would the vigilante known as the Punisher go on to be one of the most important and iconic Marvel creations of the 1970s, but his instigator, the Jackal, would become the next big threat in Spider-Man's life.

If you're a gym rat and you've got the six pack to show it, then we ALL know there's only one costume for you—a Greek Spartan warrior! You could be just like King Leonidas in The 300 and vanquish your opponents on the battlefield...or even defeat them on the dance floor if you know a move or two. And it won't matter if you're looking for admiration from goddesses, kings and queens, or your fellow warriors. Because when you're dressed in this costume, you're not going to be leaving a whole lot to the imagination!


The first human Captain Universe was an astronaut named Captain Ray Coffin. He battled Baron Karza and sealed the Prometheus Pit between the Microverse and Earth.[3] Years later, the Uni-Power would possess his son Steve Coffin to battle Mister E and his shadow slaves.[4] It next possessed identical twins Ann Stafford and Clare Dodgson to capture Nemesis,[4] and then possessed small-time cat burglar Monty Walsh to stop mafia don Guido Carboni.[5] It then possessed Doctor Strange and Commander Arcturus Rann to reinforce the space-wall between the Microverse and the Macroverse.[6] It then possessed Bruce Banner for the first time, to defuse a nuclear missile, and wound up battling Banner's own alter ego, the Hulk.[7] Captain Universe was then next among the heroes summoned by the Grandmaster for the Contest of Champions.[8] The Captain Universe power next possessed Delayne Masters to defeat schoolyard bullies.[9] It then possessed Evan Swann to stop the Quantum Mechanic from destroying the Earth.[10]
To create a zombie costume, first make your clothes look old and tattered. Try using a 1:1 bleach solution to fade clothes or make them look worn out by running a grater over areas to create small tears. Make some fake blood with corn syrup, red food coloring, and chocolate syrup to spatter on your clothes so you’ll look bloody and gory! Remember to zombify your face and hair, too, using dark purplish-brown makeup around your eye socket and eyelids so your eyes look sunken in, for example.
At Yale, every residential college has a “master”––a professor who lives in residence with their family, and is responsible for its academic, intellectual, and social life.  “Masters work with students to shape each residential college community,” Yale states, “bringing their own distinct social, cultural, and intellectual influences to the colleges.” The approach is far costlier than what’s on offer at commuter schools, but aims to create a richer intellectual environment where undergrads can learn from faculty and one another even outside the classroom.
Dr. Watts (appeared in Spider-Man 2: Enter Electro): Dr. Watts (first name unknown) is a prominent scientist. She is the creator of the Bio-Nexus Device and a world-renowned scholar of biology. In the game, she is kidnapped by Hammerhead while attending the Science Industry Ball. During Spider-Man's fight with Hammerhead, Dr. Watts disappears, which led Spider-Man to believe that the Sandman took her. Due to an anonymous tip, Spider-Man tracks Dr. Watts to a museum, where she is taken hostage by Electro. After Electro leaves the museum, Dr. Watts tells Spider-Man that Electro went to the Twin Towers.
Jump up ^ Hörandner, Editha (2005). Halloween in der Steiermark und anderswo. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 99. ISBN 9783825888893. On the other hand the postmodern phenomenon of "antifashion" is also to be found in some Halloween costumes. Black and orange are a 'must' with many costumes. Halloween - like the medieval danse macabre - is closely connected with superstitions and it might be a way of dealing with death in a playful way.
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