Samhain (/ˈsɑːwɪn, ˈsaʊɪn/) was the first and most important of the four quarter days in the medieval Gaelic calendar and was celebrated on 31 October – 1 November in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man.[39][40] A kindred festival was held at the same time of year by the Brittonic Celts, called Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Kalan Gwav in Cornwall and Kalan Goañv in Brittany; a name meaning "first day of winter". For the Celts, the day ended and began at sunset; thus the festival began on the evening before 7 November by modern reckoning(the half point between equinox and solstice).[41] Samhain and Calan Gaeaf are mentioned in some of the earliest Irish and Welsh literature. The names have been used by historians to refer to Celtic Halloween customs up until the 19th century,[42] and are still the Gaelic and Welsh names for Halloween.


Parker appears in numerous What If? universes. Among these are realities in which he is a member of the Fantastic Four; in which he was not bitten by the spider but some other supporting cast member was; in which he chose not to go into superheroics; in which he joins with Wolverine and takes up black ops work; and in which he becomes a mutated spider creature.
Norman Osborn broke out of jail and managed to clear his name of being the Green Goblin. After failing to convert Peter into his heir, he started to provoke Peter into killing him in a story called A Death in the Family. Norman was sick of his life and wanted to die at the hands of Spider-man. He tried to get Peter so mad that he would do this. First by releasing footage of Gwen's death to the media, claiming that Gwen's death was the result of Spider-Man's selfish actions. To make matters worse, Norman forced a drunken Flash Thompson to have a car accident, causing him to go into a coma. Spider-Man and the Green Goblin meet up in one of Osborn's warehouses where Spider-Man defeats the Goblin. Although he urged him to finish him off, Peter refused to play the Goblin's game and proposed a truce. Norman accepts, but as he returns to one of his offices, he puts a gun in his mouth. He is however to afraid to pull the trigger.
The game consequently incorporates some elements introduced in seasons (S17 on, largely) that were created shortly before or after the release of the previous game, such as PC Principal and Classi, who both debuted in Season Nineteen, as well as Crunchy's Micro-Brew which debuted the same season, and the re-designed Skeeer's Wine Bar, although much of ShiTpaTown is still missing. The layout of the map has been changed to include other more South Park locations, such as the Peppermint Hippo strip club. The game's development also effected the show, as it was Senior Producer Jason Schroeder who brought Matt and Trey's attention to the fan art about Tweek and Craig that became the cataylist for the episode "Tweek x Craig", which in turn informed the game's development.
The custom of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[25] In 19th century America, Halloween was often celebrated with costume parades and "licentious revelries".[26] However, efforts were made to "domesticate" the festival to conform with Victorian era morality. Halloween was made into a private rather than public holiday, celebrations involving liquor and sensuality de-emphasized, and only children were expected to celebrate the festival.[27] Early Halloween costumes emphasized the gothic nature of Halloween, and were aimed primarily at children. Costumes were also made at home, or using items (such as make-up) which could be purchased and utilized to create a costume. But in the 1930s, A.S. Fishbach, Ben Cooper, Inc., and other firms began mass-producing Halloween costumes for sale in stores as trick-or-treating became popular in North America. Halloween costumes are often designed to imitate supernatural and scary beings. Costumes are traditionally those of monsters such as vampires, werewolves, zombies, ghosts,[28] skeletons, witches, goblins, trolls, devils, etc. or in more recent years such science fiction-inspired characters as aliens and superheroes. There are also costumes of pop culture figures like presidents, athletes, celebrities, or characters in film, television, literature, etc. Another popular trend is for women (and in some cases, men) to use Halloween as an excuse to wear sexy or revealing costumes, showing off more skin than would be socially acceptable otherwise.[29] Young girls also often dress as entirely non-scary characters at Halloween, including princesses, fairies, angels, cute animals and flowers.
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