In 1984, in order to get exclusive photographs of the new Decepticon fortress in Oregon, Peter Parker donned his Spider-Man costume and used his powers to sneak closer to the action. He intercepted Gears, who had been sent on a scouting mission, and attacked, thinking Gears was one of the invaders. When Skywarp threw a tank at a gaggle of unwary reporters, Gears saved them, convincing Spider-Man he was good.
True playboys know that sex appeal goes way beyond physical appearance, and well, sometimes having a big bankroll and a mansion can help too! We can't get you started on the path towards being rich and famous, but we can give you the costume to let you be the ultimate philanderer—Hugh Hefner! This smoking jacket will turn you into the famed founder of Playboy magazine and the original lone resident of the Playboy mansion.
In a Manhattan warehouse, an innocent man has been murdered during a mysterious crime. Evidence points to the involvement of Venom-- the alien symbiote who is obsessed with Spider-Man's destruction. Yet Venom has always safeguarded innocent lives--- has he gone completely around the bend, or is there another suspect?Spider-Man thinks there is more to the crime than meets the eye. The spectre of the Hobgoblin, one of Spider-Man's nastiest villains, falls on a series of thefts, and leads the web-slinger to a deadly secret that may cause New York's destruction. Spider-Man must outsmart two of his most lethal foes to save the city-- but even more danger awaits him!
While Peter Parker still becomes the titular Spider-Man in the comic book starring his name, the initial focus of the story is upon Daily Bugle reporter Ben Urich, an experienced and respected reporter who has a network of informants under the alias of the Spider. The Goblin is a crime lord named Osborn whose henchmen consist of the Enforcers (consisting of Ox, Fancy Dan, Montana), Kraven, the Chameleon (a master of disguise) and the Vulture (a sideshow freak who had developed a taste for human flesh). Urich does not use the information he has to expose the Goblin but rather to blackmail him, in order to get enough money to feed his secret drug habit.[1]

Jump up ^ Braden, Donna R.; Village, Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield (1988). Leisure and entertainment in America. Henry Ford Museum & Greenfield Village. ISBN 9780933728325. Archived from the original on 15 July 2014. Retrieved 2 June 2014. Halloween, a holiday with religious origins but increasingly secularized as celebrated in America, came to assume major proportions as a children's festivity.
The modern imagery of Halloween comes from many sources, including Christian eschatology, national customs, works of Gothic and horror literature (such as the novels Frankenstein and Dracula) and classic horror films (such as Frankenstein and The Mummy).[128][129] Imagery of the skull, a reference to Golgotha in the Christian tradition, serves as "a reminder of death and the transitory quality of human life" and is consequently found in memento mori and vanitas compositions;[130] skulls have therefore been commonplace in Halloween, which touches on this theme.[131] Traditionally, the back walls of churches are "decorated with a depiction of the Last Judgment, complete with graves opening and the dead rising, with a heaven filled with angels and a hell filled with devils", a motif that has permeated the observance of this triduum.[132] One of the earliest works on the subject of Halloween is from Scottish poet John Mayne, who, in 1780, made note of pranks at Halloween; "What fearfu' pranks ensue!", as well as the supernatural associated with the night, "Bogies" (ghosts), influencing Robert Burns' "Halloween" (1785).[133] Elements of the autumn season, such as pumpkins, corn husks, and scarecrows, are also prevalent. Homes are often decorated with these types of symbols around Halloween. Halloween imagery includes themes of death, evil, and mythical monsters.[134] Black, orange, and sometimes purple are Halloween's traditional colors.
Jump up ^ "BBC – Religions – Christianity: All Hallows' Eve". British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). 2010. Archived from the original on 3 November 2011. Retrieved 1 November 2011. All Hallows' Eve falls on 31st October each year, and is the day before All Hallows' Day, also known as All Saints' Day in the Christian calendar. The Church traditionally held a vigil on All Hallows' Eve when worshippers would prepare themselves with prayers and fasting prior to the feast day itself.
Spider-Man managed to track his friends to the Washington Monument and reached the place just as the Chitauri Energy Core exploded inside Ned Leeds backpack. Karen informed him that his friends were trapped inside the Monument elevator, which was in danger of plummeting, and Spider-Man scaled the monument as quickly as he could, locating the most optimal entry point of the monument with his suit.
To make matters worst, the Mary Jane clone was water based and was made for Hydro-Man. Next, Marvel did a tribute to the Secret Wars. Madame Webb was going to help Spider-Man find the real Mary Jane, who was still alive somewhere. As Spider-Man continued his search for Mary Jane, Madame Web and the Beyonder set up a chain of events where Spider-Man faced different versions of himself from different universes. One was him, where he is a rich multi-millionaire, and wears a metallic Spider-Suit, and has publicly made his identity known to the world. This version was made to mirror Marvel's popular super hero multi-billionaire, Tony Stark, a.k.a. Iron Man. Spider-Man in another reality he went to, found out he was married to a woman he never met in his life, Gwen Stacey. Gwen had never appeared in the series until now. Gwen revealed information of another Parker alternate reality. This one was strongly grieving of the death of Aunt May, he cut his hair, died it blonde, and went out as Spider-Man. However, he met a foe he could not beat, the Carnage symbiote. The symbiote felt the pain of Ben Reilly as he changed his name to negate any Parker ties. The symbiote and Reilly bond to become Spider-Carnage. All of the different Spider-Man realities, including the real Spider-Man, battled Spider- Carnage. They could not defeat him however. When he sees Gwen Stacey, his love of killing is put on hold, since he has romantic feelings for Gwen he has never gotten over. He thus realized what he had become, and committed suicide. After all was said and done, one Spider-Man had to take him with him to his reality. This one is our world. He is astounded at the fact of being an international symbol in our world, and before he leaves, he meets with the man who created him, Stan Lee.

After Peter was separated from the symbiote by Mr. Fantastic, he was left without a costume and as part of a practical joke; the Human Torch gave him an old Fantastic Four costume with a paper bag for his head, dubbing him the Bombastic Bag-Man. When he was accused of murder, Spidey would use this moniker on another occasion to prevent others from identifying him but this time he only wore a Paper-Bag mask while only wearing orange pants.


Jump up ^ Kaplan, Arie (2008). From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books. The Jewish Publication Society. p. 120. ISBN 978-0827608436. In Uncanny X-Men #129 cover-dated Jan. 1979 and on sale in late 1978, writer Chris Claremont and the artist John Byrne created Katherine "Kitty" Pryde, aka Shadowcat, a young Jewish girl who possess the mutant ability to walk through walls.
Janine Godbe a.k.a. Elizabeth Tyne The one great love of Ben's life. Ben found out Janine was living under an assumed name after she murdered the father who molested her. Ben confided in Janine that he was a clone of Spider-Man. Later Kaine forced Janine to fake her death to hurt Ben. Janine later turned herself into the police for killing her father. In the MC2 universe Darkdevil is Ben and Janine's son.
Christian Bale found the original Batsuit to be very uncomfortable and restrictive, as it was still very much derived from the standard WB batsuits of the past first established by Michael Keaton, with little improvement. The "bat suit wrangler", Day Murch from the 90's films was brought on to assist Bale and stuntmen like Buster Reeves. From Christopher Nolan's point of view, he was dissatisfied with the appearance of the foam rubber cowl, within the fiction it supposed to be made of a solid graphite material. For these reasons, Bruce's desire for a new costume in the movies was put into the story.

In “The Coddling of the American Mind,” Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt argued that too many college students engage in “catastrophizing,” which is to say, turning common events into nightmarish trials or claiming that easily bearable events are too awful to bear. After citing examples, they concluded, “smart people do, in fact, overreact to innocuous speech, make mountains out of molehills, and seek punishment for anyone whose words make anyone else feel uncomfortable.”
Halloween costumes in the contemporary Western world sometimes depict people and things from present times and are sometimes read in terms of their political and cultural significance. Halloween costumes are sometimes denounced for cultural appropriation when they uncritically use stereotypical representations of other groups of people.[38][39] Immigration and Customs Enforcement Secretary Julie Myers was involved in a scandal when she awarded "Best Costume" at the ICE Halloween party to an 'escaped Jamaican prisoner' dressed in dreadlocks and blackface.[40]
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