Following this, Holland reprised his role in Spider-Man: Homecoming, a 2017 co-production between Marvel Studios and Sony. The film also starred Michael Keaton as Adrian Toomes/Vulture, Marissa Tomei as Aunt May, Jacob Batalon as Ned Lee, Zendaya as MJ, Laura Harrier as Liz Allan, Bokeem Woodbine as Herman Schultz/Shocker, Michael Chernus as Phineas Mason/Tinkerer, Tony Revolori as Flash Thompson, Jon Favreau as Harold "Happy" Hogan and Robert Downey, Jr. as Tony Stark.
Holland also reprises his role in the third Avengers film, Avengers: Infinity War, where he joins the heroes in the fight against Thanos. He is first seen in action leaving a school bus during a field trip when he sees Thanos' forces invading New York before proceeding to help Stark, Doctor Strange and Wong in fighting off Cull Obsidian and Ebony Maw from kidnapping Strange. However, the Black Order succeeds in capturing Strange, leaving Parker and Stark to get inside the ship which the two Black Order members used to travel to Earth in order to rescue Strange. The two Avengers were able to send Maw into outer space and rescued Strange from being tortured when he refused to give up the Time Stone. The trio decide to head to Titan in order to deal with Thanos themselves only to meet Star-Lord, Mantis and Drax the Destroyer of the Guardians of the Galaxy who also went to Titan to fight Thanos and rescue Gamora. Thanos then arrives on Titan to attain the Time Stone from Strange which leads to him and the team having a fearsome battle and ends with Thanos being mentally incapacitated by Mantis while the others try to take off Thanos' Infinity Gauntlet from his hand. However, this plan fails after Quill attacks Thanos when he learns the former was responsible for Gamora's death which lets Thanos to break away from being mentally incapacitated.
All seemed to go well again until Mary-Jane, whom had started acting again, was threatened by a stalker. It started with phone-calls, but when Mary-Jane took a plane, it exploded in mid-air and seemingly killed Mary-Jane. Peter, firstly stricken with grief, did not believe she had died. He knew it must have had something to do with the stalker, and Peter started a crusade to find out the truth. This brought him to Latveria and in a fight against the Hulk among others. Eventually, Peter learned that it was indeed the stalker that had faked Mary-Jane's death and had held her captive during it all. The stalker was a mutant that absorbed all of Peter's memories when he was saved by him during one of Spider-man's fights on the streets of New York. The Stalker needed Mary-Jan for himself because of it and he felled he knew her. Spider-man managed to save Mary-Jane and defeat the Stalker. Mary-Jane however was traumatized by the experience and needed time of from her life as the wife of a superhero. The two parted ways for some time.
It seemed that Spider-man was finally back on track, with his name cleared and his life finally looking a bit better than it had in recent months. Norman Osborn however kept being a disturbing presence to Peter and Mary Jane. He started a ritual known as the Gathering of the Five, with one person getting Ultimate power, one got death, one got insanity and so on. Norman thought he gained power, but it turned out that it was insanity that he got. He attacked and kidnapped Peter. While he was captive, Peter got the shock of a life-time. His aunt May was standing in front of him, alive and well. After Spider-man broke free and defeated Norman Osborn, seemingly for good, as he was taken to a mental hospital, Peter learned that it was in fact aunt May he found. Not a clone, not a hoax. Norman had apparently kidnapped May years ago, and had an actress surgically look like aunt May and play her part while she was dying. This was why 'aunt May' knew about Peter being Spider-Man, she was hired by Norman Osborn to play her! Reed Richards of the Fantastic Four assured Peter it was his aunt. Peter saw this as a sign and stopped being Spider-Man altogether, finally living a good life with his aunt May and his wife Mary-Jane.

Spider-Man became a force for good, from stopping muggings to rescuing workers at a construction site. These heroic activities also gained him positive media attention but he still didn’t want to get back in show business. Even after Shiffman told him they could make millions, Peter chose responsibility over money. His heroism had also earned Spider-Man a certain fan named Flash Thompson. Spider-Man soon encountered another teenager with superpowers of her own and he and Joey Pulaski became friends. However it turned out that Joey was working for The Kingpin and the friends inevitably clashed, resulting in Joey’s defeat and arrest. Although portrayed as just a misguided kid, chronologically Joey Pulaski was the first super powered being Spider-Man had encountered.


Peter Parker's re-emerged consciousness begins to explore his Mindscape, discovering the world is now a large empty space, with only the very few key memories left. Recalling that he's more than Peter Parker, he is Spider-Man, he declares that Otto had made a big mistake in leaving the memories that define him and promises to find a way to regain the control of his body. Continuing to explore the Mindscape for clues into reclaiming his body from Doctor Octopus, he makes a note that only 31 pieces of his memories are left and wonders what he can do with them. Just then, he stumbles upon the memory of his fight with the Green Goblin at the Brooklyn Bridge, wonders why Doctor Octopus is probing into this. Deciding to delve into Doctor Octopus's memories for a way out, he is overwhelmed by the amount of memories and struggles to hold on. He sees a bright light and witnesses the moment of Otto Octavius's birth. Peter Parker's consciousness struggles to fight against the deluge of Doctor Octopus' memories, but it proves too much and he convinces himself that he is Doctor Octopus merging with Otto's memories.

"Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF" is a fundraising program to support UNICEF,[84] a United Nations Programme that provides humanitarian aid to children in developing countries. Started as a local event in a Northeast Philadelphia neighborhood in 1950 and expanded nationally in 1952, the program involves the distribution of small boxes by schools (or in modern times, corporate sponsors like Hallmark, at their licensed stores) to trick-or-treaters, in which they can solicit small-change donations from the houses they visit. It is estimated that children have collected more than $118 million for UNICEF since its inception. In Canada, in 2006, UNICEF decided to discontinue their Halloween collection boxes, citing safety and administrative concerns; after consultation with schools, they instead redesigned the program.[161][162]
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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