Jump up ^ "Halloween Pranks Keep Police on Hop", Oregon Journal (Portland, Oregon), 1 November 1934; and "The Gangsters of Tomorrow", The Helena Independent (Helena, Montana), 2 November 1934, p. 4. The Chicago Tribune also mentioned door-to-door begging in Aurora, Illinois on Halloween in 1934, although not by the term 'trick-or-treating'. "Front Views and Profiles" (column), Chicago Tribune, 3 November 1934, p. 17.

Jump up ^ Cleene, Marcel. Compendium of Symbolic and Ritual Plants in Europe. Man & Culture, 2002. p.108. Quote: "Soul cakes were small cakes baked as food for the deceased or offered for the salvation of their souls. They were therefore offered at funerals and feasts of the dead, laid on graves, or given to the poor as representatives of the dead. The baking of these soul cakes is a universal practice".


In Ireland and Scotland, the turnip has traditionally been carved during Halloween,[124][125] but immigrants to North America used the native pumpkin, which is both much softer and much larger – making it easier to carve than a turnip.[124] The American tradition of carving pumpkins is recorded in 1837[126] and was originally associated with harvest time in general, not becoming specifically associated with Halloween until the mid-to-late 19th century.[127]
This suit is based upon a reality in which Peter Parker's uncle Ben did not die, and eventually learned how to bring other Spider-Men into his universe to absorb their powers. After trying to absorb Spider-Man from Earth-616 (our universe), things backfired and this version of Peter Parker was put into a coma, while his spirit was trapped in Hell. It wasn't until later that his spirit was freed, giving him a second chance at life as the Ghost Spider - bearing the flaming skull head
The time between Spider-Man capturing the burglar that killed Uncle Ben and him becoming a superhero was told over 30 years after his origin when the Amazing Fantasy series was continued in 1995 by writer Kurt Busiek (#16-18, Dec. 1995 – Mar. 1996). After catching the burglar that killed Ben, Peter had given up being Spider-Man as it reminded him of his irresponsible behavior that ultimately led to his uncle’s death. Even though Maxie Shiffman, the agent he had hired when he was a costumed wrestler, was putting out ads to track down Spider-Man, Peter didn’t want anything to do with that life. Ben had been the only earner in the family and after his death Peter and his Aunt May were struggling for money. A salesman tried to con May into buying furniture that Ben had apparently left a deposit on before his death. Although the salesman had seemed genuine at the time, Peter caught Mr. Vale pulling the same stunt on an old widower when he was swinging through the city in his Spider-Man costume to clear his head. Spider-Man followed Mr. Vale to a warehouse where he discovered a whole gang of organized criminals led by The Undertaker. Spider-Man challenged the gang and soon had them rounded up for the police. Chronologically this was the first time Spider-Man had been threatened with a gun. More significantly, during the fight he discovered his Spider-Sense for the first time. Capturing these criminals lead Peter to believe that this is how he has to make up for Uncle Ben’s death, by using his powers to help others.
Jump up ^ Simon, Joe, with Jim Simon. The Comic Book Makers (Crestwood/II, 1990) ISBN 1-887591-35-4. "There were a few holes in Jack's never-dependable memory. For instance, there was no Black Magic involved at all. ... Jack brought in the Spider-Man logo that I had loaned to him before we changed the name to The Silver Spider. Kirby laid out the story to Lee about the kid who finds a ring in a spiderweb, gets his powers from the ring, and goes forth to fight crime armed with The Silver Spider's old web-spinning pistol. Stan Lee said, 'Perfect, just what I want.' After obtaining permission from publisher Martin Goodman, Lee told Kirby to pencil-up an origin story. Kirby... using parts of an old rejected superhero named Night Fighter... revamped the old Silver Spider script, including revisions suggested by Lee. But when Kirby showed Lee the sample pages, it was Lee's turn to gripe. He had been expecting a skinny young kid who is transformed into a skinny young kid with spider powers. Kirby had him turn into... Captain America with cobwebs. He turned Spider-Man over to Steve Ditko, who... ignored Kirby's pages, tossed the character's magic ring, web-pistol and goggles... and completely redesigned Spider-Man's costume and equipment. In this life, he became high-school student Peter Parker, who gets his spider powers after being bitten by a radioactive spider. ... Lastly, the Spider-Man logo was redone and a dashing hyphen added".
Spider-Man has a limited healing factor. While not on Wolverine's level, it is sufficiently powerful enough to recover from severe injuries from broken bones and large amounts of tissue damage in a matter of days. After getting his powers, he soon found that his eyesight was repaired, discarding his glasses. During a battle with a villain called the Masked Marauder, Spider-Man is rendered completely blind, however after about 2 days his sight was perfect, albeit sensitive for about a day after. In another instance, he suffered multiple broken bones, trauma, and blood loss when he was defeated by the Rhino, but was fine in the next issue.
Whoo! The Nature Boy knows a thing or two about the ladies, and he's been Whoo-ing and strutting his stuff for close to 40 years now. And his sexy swagger hasn't diminished at all over the years, like a fine wine, The Nature Boy just keeps on walking down the aisle stylin' and profilin'. With this exclusive, you can suit up just like Ric Flair for some timeless sex appeal. As Ric says, "Because all the women want to be with me, all the men want to be like me."
Manly men know that Ron Burgundy is kind of a big deal. And he wears that iconic 70s mustache like few others can! If you'd like to step into the role of the KVWB Channel 4 broadcaster, one of our authentic men's costumes is sure to be just the choice. They're officially licensed from Paramount Pictures, and with exclusive designs, you're sure to have a leg up on your other party goers. And even if your upper lip is a little bare, don't worry if you've got your sights set on being this Anchorman. Because our exclusive costume come with the adhesive mustache included!

The film was a hit at the box office, and as a result, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 was released in 2014. The film featured the return of most of the original cast, as well as new faces like Jamie Foxx as Max Dillon/Electro, Dane DeHaan as Harry Osborn/Green Goblin and Paul Giamatti as Aleksei Sytsevich/The Rhino. While the movie was a modest financial success, it was heavily panned by critics and made less at the box office than its predecessor. Despite plans for a third movie and a host of spin-offs (including a solo Venom movie, a female-led team movie featuring characters like Silver Sable, Black Cat, Spider-Gwen, Stunner and Lightbrght, and a Sinister Six movie) , the decision was made to discontinue the franchise.
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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