In 1992, Marvel revealed that Northstar, a member of the Canadian mutant superhero team Alpha Flight, was homosexual, after years of implication.[58] This ended a long-standing editorial mandate that there would be no homosexual characters in Marvel comics.[59] Although some minor secondary characters in DC Comics' mature-audience 1980s miniseries Watchmen were gay, and the reformed supervillain Pied Piper came out to Wally West in an issue of The Flash in 1991, Northstar is considered to be the first openly gay superhero appearing in mainstream comic books. From the mid-2000s onward, several established Marvel and DC comics characters (or a variant version of the pre-existing character) were outed or reintroduced as LGBT individuals by both publishers. Examples include the Mikaal Tomas incarnation of Starman in 1998; Colossus in the Ultimate X-Men series; Renee Montoya in DC's Gotham Central series in 2003; the Kate Kane incarnation of Batwoman in 2006; Rictor and Shatterstar in an issue of X-Factor in 2009; the Golden Age Green Lantern Alan Scott is reimagined as openly gay following The New 52 reboot in 2011;[60][61] and in 2015, a younger time displaced version of Iceman in an issue of All-New X-Men.[62]
While battling the first Zebra-Man, Bruce Wayne was accidentally irradiated by the same energy that had irradiated Jake Baker. Without an inhibitor belt, Bruce's diamagnetism powers were out of control, causing Robin to go on without him. Batman soon took advantage of the diamagnetism, however, and used it to attract Zebra-Man to him and attract both of them to Gotham City Police Department. 

[32] Researchers conducted a survey for the National Retail Federation in the United States and found that 53.3 percent of consumers planned to buy a costume for Halloween 2005, spending $38.11 on average (up $10 from the year before). They were also expected to spend $4.96 billion in 2006, up significantly from just $3.3 billion the previous year.[33] The troubled economy has caused many Americans to cut back on Halloween spending. In 2009, the National Retail Federation anticipated that American households would decrease Halloween spending by as much as 15% to $56.31.[34] In 2013, Americans spent an estimated $6.9 billion to celebrate Halloween, including a predicted $2.6 billion on costumes (with more spent on adult costumes than for children's costumes) and $330 million on pet costumes.[35][36] In 2017 it was estimated that Americans would spend $9.1 billion on Halloween merchandise with $3.4 billion of that being on spend on Halloween costumes.[37]

Spider-Man crashed into the lake, got tangled in his parachute underwater, and nearly drowned. Iron Man retrieved him with a remotely controlled armor, and explained that he installed a tracker into Parker's suit, allowing Stark to observe Parker. Parker explained the situation to him, but Stark urged Parker to forget the Vulture and let more experienced people handle the Vulture's activity.[2]

As the embittered webslinger faces further robot attacks, each deadlier than the last, his spider-sense warns that Jameson himself is behind them, possibly colluding with Electro, Alistaire Smythe, or another of Spider-Man's mortal foes. Convinced that his worst critic has become a mortal enemy, Spider-Man declares war on Jameson -- a war the publisher is eager to wage. But in their relentless pursuit of victory, they both risk losing everything that matters to them -- and may both fall victim to the cataclysmic secret behind the robots.


Lesley Bannatyne and Cindy Ott both write that Anglican colonists in the Southern United States and Catholic colonists in Maryland "recognized All Hallow's Eve in their church calendars",[114][115] although the Puritans of New England maintained strong opposition to the holiday, along with other traditional celebrations of the established Church, including Christmas.[116] Almanacs of the late 18th and early 19th century give no indication that Halloween was widely celebrated in North America.[117] It was not until mass Irish and Scottish immigration in the 19th century that Halloween became a major holiday in North America.[117] Confined to the immigrant communities during the mid-19th century, it was gradually assimilated into mainstream society and by the first decade of the 20th century it was being celebrated coast to coast by people of all social, racial and religious backgrounds.[118] "In Cajun areas, a nocturnal Mass was said in cemeteries on Halloween night. Candles that had been blessed were placed on graves, and families sometimes spent the entire night at the graveside".[119]
He’ll be ready for battle in his Silver Mirror Ninja costume, which includes a hood with mirror mask. This fierce garb will look amazing on any budding fighter. For extra fierceness, get him the Skull Dragon Ninja costume, so he can be even more intimidating and feel extra powerful. He can practice his ninja moves in the days leading up to October 31 so that when he makes his debut in front of his classmates or goes around the neighborhood he’s perfected his role for the day.

Jump up ^ Mahon, Bríd (1991). Land of Milk and Honey: The Story of Traditional Irish Food & Drink. Poolbeg Press. p. 138. ISBN 9781853711428. The vigil of the feast is Halloween, the night when charms and incantations were powerful, when people looked into the future, and when feasting and merriment were ordained. Up to recent time this was a day of abstinence, when according to church ruling no flesh meat was allowed. Colcannon, apple cake and barm brack, as well as apples and nuts were part of the festive fare.
Marvel published a limited series called Powerless in 2004, which tells how the Marvel Universe would be without super-powers. In this series, Peter Parker appears as a young man nicknamed Spider-Man on the internet. This version had also been bitten by a radioactive spider, but instead of getting super-powers his hand became atrophic. In this continuity, Peter is in love with Gwen Stacy; Mary Jane is not featured.[23]
On the evening of 11 May 1984, in Jackson Township, New Jersey, the Haunted Castle (Six Flags Great Adventure) caught fire. As a result of the fire, eight teenagers perished.[184] The backlash to the tragedy was a tightening of regulations relating to safety, building codes and the frequency of inspections of attractions nationwide. The smaller venues, especially the nonprofit attractions, were unable to compete financially, and the better funded commercial enterprises filled the vacuum.[185][186] Facilities that were once able to avoid regulation because they were considered to be temporary installations now had to adhere to the stricter codes required of permanent attractions.[187][188][189]
The next night, May drove Parker and Leeds to the Toomes Residence. Despite wearing his Spider-Man suit underneath his clothes, Parker was adamant to be himself. They greeted Toomes and noticed that Michelle Jones was also attending the party. However, after another taunt from Thompson, Parker excused himself and donned his costume outside on the residence's roof. On the roof, Parker spotted a nearby explosion, which he proceeded to investigate.

A popular variant of trick-or-treating, known as trunk-or-treating (or Halloween tailgaiting), occurs when "children are offered treats from the trunks of cars parked in a church parking lot", or sometimes, a school parking lot.[113][152] In a trunk-or-treat event, the trunk (boot) of each automobile is decorated with a certain theme,[153] such as those of children's literature, movies, scripture, and job roles.[154] Trunk-or-treating has grown in popularity due to its perception as being more safe than going door to door, a point that resonates well with parents, as well as the fact that it "solves the rural conundrum in which homes [are] built a half-mile apart".[155][156]
Jump up ^ Cowsill, Alan; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1990s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 184. ISBN 978-0756692360. Todd McFarlane was at the top of his game as an artist, and with Marvel's release of this new Spidey series he also got the chance to take on the writing duties. The sales of this series were nothing short of phenomenal, with approx. 2.5 million copies eventually printing, including special bagged editions and a number of variant covers.
In a parking lot, Spider-Man webbed Davis's hand onto his car bonnet, but Davis poked fun at Spider-Man for using a voice filter. Flustered, Spider-Man disabled the Enhanced Interrogation Protocol and asked for Vulture's location. Davis, grateful for Spider-Man's intervention several nights earlier, informed him of another weapons deal to be made on Staten Island Ferry.[2]
^ Jump up to: a b Pulliam, June; Fonseca, Anthony J. (26 September 2016). Ghosts in Popular Culture and Legend. ABC-CLIO. p. 145. ISBN 9781440834912. Since the 16th century, costumes have become a central part of Halloween traditions. Perhaps the most common traditional Halloween costume is that of the ghost. This is likely because ... when Halloween customs began to be influenced by Catholicism, the incorporation of the themes of All Hallows' and All Souls' Day would have emphasized visitations from the spirit world over the motifs of spirites and fairies. ... The baking and sharing of souls cakes was introduced around the 15th century: in some cultures, the poor would go door to door to collect them in exchange for praying for the dead (a practice called souling), often carrying lanterns made of hollowed-out turnips. Around the 16th century, the practice of going house to house in disguise (a practice called guising) to ask for food began and was often accompanied by recitation of traditional verses (a practice called mumming). Wearing costumes, another tradition, has many possible explanations, such as it was done to confuse the spirits or souls who visited the earth or who rose from local graveyards to engage in what was called a Danse Macabre, basically a large party among the dead.
While trying to stop a robbery, Spider-Man is blamed for the accidental shooting of an innocent bystander. This makes the web-slinger the perfect target for anti-super hero mayoral candidate Brian Timilty. However, Timilty is secretly the pawn of Tyler Stewart, a wealthy businessman seeking to take over New York's crime syndicates. Wanted by police and forced into hiding, Spider-Man must find a way to clear his name without being shot on sight. And that's when Electro and Rhino--two of his deadliest foes--arrive on the scene to complicate matters.
A few days after amazing crowds numerous times, Peter was walking home when he saw a police car in front of his house. Wondering what was going on he asked the policeman what happened. He was shocked when he was told that his Uncle Ben was murdered by a burglar attempting to steal from the Parkers. Ben was shot after attempting to stop him, dying almost instantly. Furious, Peter donned his costume and set out for vengeance. Tracking the murderer to an abandoned warehouse, Spidey confronted the criminal, knocking out the man with one punch. When he looked at the fugitive's face he realized this burglar was the guy the security guard was chasing at the TV set! With his uncle paying the ultimate price for his inaction and indifference, he found out with great power comes great responsibility. From then on, Peter decided to use his newfound powers not for personal gain, but to fight crime and protect the innocent.
This version of Spider-Man appeared in a 4 issue miniseries (Feb-May 2009). He exists in the Great Depression Era of New York in the 1930s. Aunt May is a speaker of equality and spends time standing on a soap box shouting her beliefs. Uncle Ben was killed by a crime syndicate run by Norman Osborn, aka The Goblin. Shortly afterward, Peter is bitten by a strange spider and endowed with mystical spider-powers. Though he has a wall-crawling ability, he has increased agility, strength, a form of spider-sense, and can spray nets of webbing from his hand. He then dons a black mask, gloves, and a trenchcoat and sets out to stop Norman and his gang!
[32] Researchers conducted a survey for the National Retail Federation in the United States and found that 53.3 percent of consumers planned to buy a costume for Halloween 2005, spending $38.11 on average (up $10 from the year before). They were also expected to spend $4.96 billion in 2006, up significantly from just $3.3 billion the previous year.[33] The troubled economy has caused many Americans to cut back on Halloween spending. In 2009, the National Retail Federation anticipated that American households would decrease Halloween spending by as much as 15% to $56.31.[34] In 2013, Americans spent an estimated $6.9 billion to celebrate Halloween, including a predicted $2.6 billion on costumes (with more spent on adult costumes than for children's costumes) and $330 million on pet costumes.[35][36] In 2017 it was estimated that Americans would spend $9.1 billion on Halloween merchandise with $3.4 billion of that being on spend on Halloween costumes.[37]
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