B-ankh! · Wrap Battler · Futankhamun ·  Idiot Box · Infernal Impaler · Steel Pipes · Shoestring Budget ·  Blazing Bull · Fallen Angel · Tail From the Crypt · Apparition's Aspect · Last Breath · Hair of the Dog · Scottish Snarl · Pickled Paws ·  Can Opener · Soviet Stitch-Up · Steel-Toed Stompers ·  Buzz Killer · Frontier Flyboy · Legend of Bugfoot ·  Dr. Gogglestache · Emerald Jarate · Einstein ·  Holy Hunter · Silver Bullets · Garlic Flank Stake ·  Griffin's Gog · Intangible Ascot · Under Cover · Bombinomicon · MONOCULUS! · Ghastlierest Gibus · Seal Mask · Spine-Chilling Skull 2011
Comic-book companies were in the early stages of cultural expansion and many of these characters played to specific stereotypes; Cage and many of his contemporaries often employed lingo similar to that of blaxploitation films, Native Americans were often associated with shamanism and wild animals, and Asian Americans were often portrayed as kung fu martial artists. Subsequent minority heroes, such as the X-Men's Storm and the Teen Titans' Cyborg avoided such conventions; they were both part of ensemble teams, which became increasingly diverse in subsequent years. The X-Men, in particular, were revived in 1975 with a line-up of characters culled from several nations, including the Kenyan Storm, German Nightcrawler, Russian Colossus, Irish Banshee, and Japanese Sunfire. In 1993, Milestone Comics, an African-American-owned media/publishing company entered into a publishing agreement with DC Comics that allowed them to introduce a line of comics that included characters of many ethnic minorities. Milestone's initial run lasted four years, during which it introduced Static, a character adapted into the WB Network animated series Static Shock.

You have no idea how I did that. You have no knowledge of the laundry place. Maybe you speak French, and you can’t even hail a taxi. You can’t pay for one, you don’t have dollars in your pocket. Yet I knew how to do all of that. And you didn’t have to know any of it. All that complexity was hidden inside of me, and we were able to interact at a very high level of abstraction. That’s what objects are. They encapsulate complexity, and the interfaces to that complexity are high level.
While out web-swinging, Spider-Man sees a brilliant purple light from a distant warehouse, and investigates it to find Mysterio ranting about how he missed out on one chance to kill Spider-Man already. Although Spider-Man quickly defeats him and ties him up, when examining Mysterio's equipment, he is shot by Mysterio, causing him to fall through the rift created by the equipment. When he regains consciousness, he discovers that it is daylight. Although he interrupts a mugging, he is shocked and confused when the would-be victim informs him that, while he is grateful for the rescue, it might be disrespectful to be seen wearing Peter Parker's suit after his death. Swinging away to think about what he has just heard, Spider-Man runs into another Spider-Man on a rooftop.[3]
This version of Spider-Man first appeared in Marvel Adventures Spider-Man #53-#61 before appearing in the re-titled Spider-Man: Marvel Adventures comic book series. A modern-day high school student, this Spider-Man's origin is similar to his mainstream counterpart, but his supporting cast is significantly different. Although Gwen Stacy exists in this universe, she and Peter are not dating—instead Peter is dating a brand-new character named Sophia "Chat" Sanduval, who is a mutant with the ability to talk to animals. Peter's relationship with Gwen's father Captain George Stacy also differs from the original version—here, Captain Stacy discovers Peter's secret identity early on, yet rather than hide this information from Peter (as his mainstream counterpart did), he confides in Peter and becomes Spider-Man's unofficial police contact. While this Spider-Man battles super villains, he is generally more concerned with combating street-level crime and focuses heavily on taking down the Torino Family, a powerful New York City mob.[volume & issue needed]
Spider-Men is a five-issue, 2012 superhero comic book miniseries published by Marvel Comics, featuring Peter Parker, the original Spider-Man, and Miles Morales, the second and current Ultimate Marvel version of Spider-Man, who appear together in a crossover storyline that involves the two alternate universes from which they each originate. The series is written by Brian Michael Bendis and illustrated by Sara Pichelli.[1][2] It marks the first time that characters from the original Marvel Universe and the Ultimate Universe have crossed over since the latter debuted in 2000.
The Batsuit has an electrical system that can shock assailants as a last resort. The Batsuit is made of triple-weave kevlar centered around the most obvious target, the chest-mounted Bat symbol. Though the suit has been drawn many different ways by different artists, and the stories themselves have described Batman as modifying the details of his costume from time to time, it is most often depicted as consisting of a scalloped cape, a bat-like cowl, a pair of gloves, boots, a yellow utility belt, and a tight-fitting body suit with the image of a bat emblazoned on the chest.
Halloween costumes in the contemporary Western world sometimes depict people and things from present times and are sometimes read in terms of their political and cultural significance. Halloween costumes are sometimes denounced for cultural appropriation when they uncritically use stereotypical representations of other groups of people.[38][39] Immigration and Customs Enforcement Secretary Julie Myers was involved in a scandal when she awarded "Best Costume" at the ICE Halloween party to an 'escaped Jamaican prisoner' dressed in dreadlocks and blackface.[40]
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