After graduating from High School, Peter Parker enrolled at ESU ( Empire State University) where Flash introduced him to Harry Osborn and Gwen Stacy. During this time, Aunt May suffered from a serious heart attack. Peter would constantly blow his friends off and they saw this as an insult. Eventually their relationship would get better as Peter became more involved with his peers. He and Harry became best friends and roommates. Peter also started dating Gwen Stacy. He would also meet Anna Watson's niece Mary Jane. Although he was attracted to Mary Jane, Peter decided to settle with Gwen because MJ was too much of a "party girl" for him. Peter loves Gwen, but their relationship was strained a bit by him constantly leaving to fight crime. Their relationship was saved by Gwen's father, Police Captain George Stacy, an ally of Spider-Man, who approved of Peter dating his daughter. Gwen's father was later killed during a battle between Spider-Man and Doctor Octopus, after he was crushed by falling debris while saving a child. In his dying breath, George called Spider-Man "Peter", revealing that he had always known about his dual identity and urged him to take care of Gwen. George's death caused a strain in the couple's relationship because Gwen blamed Spider-Man for her loss. She left Peter for some time to live with her uncle in London.

^ Doctor Octopus is regarded as one of Spider-Man's worst enemies and archenemy. He has been cited as the man Peter might have become if he had not been raised with a sense of responsibility.[16][141] He is infamous for defeating him the first time in battle and for almost marrying Peter's Aunt May. He is the core leader of the Sinister Six and has also referred himself as the "Master Planner". ("If This Be My Destiny...!")[142] Later depictions revealed him in Peter Parker's body where he was the titular character for a while.[141]


After Spider-Man successfully apprehended the Vulture, Stark offered Parker another suit if he moved into the New Avengers Facility as the newest Avenger. However, Parker turned Stark's invitation down, preferring to operate in Queens as a local hero instead. Impressed at his maturity, Stark accepted his decision and returned the second suit back to Parker, after having confiscated it earlier following the Ambush at the Staten Island Ferry.
The custom of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[25] In 19th century America, Halloween was often celebrated with costume parades and "licentious revelries".[26] However, efforts were made to "domesticate" the festival to conform with Victorian era morality. Halloween was made into a private rather than public holiday, celebrations involving liquor and sensuality de-emphasized, and only children were expected to celebrate the festival.[27] Early Halloween costumes emphasized the gothic nature of Halloween, and were aimed primarily at children. Costumes were also made at home, or using items (such as make-up) which could be purchased and utilized to create a costume. But in the 1930s, A.S. Fishbach, Ben Cooper, Inc., and other firms began mass-producing Halloween costumes for sale in stores as trick-or-treating became popular in North America. Halloween costumes are often designed to imitate supernatural and scary beings. Costumes are traditionally those of monsters such as vampires, werewolves, zombies, ghosts,[28] skeletons, witches, goblins, trolls, devils, etc. or in more recent years such science fiction-inspired characters as aliens and superheroes. There are also costumes of pop culture figures like presidents, athletes, celebrities, or characters in film, television, literature, etc. Another popular trend is for women (and in some cases, men) to use Halloween as an excuse to wear sexy or revealing costumes, showing off more skin than would be socially acceptable otherwise.[29] Young girls also often dress as entirely non-scary characters at Halloween, including princesses, fairies, angels, cute animals and flowers.
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