Spider-Man versus his most implacable enemy! Norman Osborn is a respected businessman, the owner of several companies, including the New York Daily Bugle. He is also secretly the super-villain known as the Green Goblin--a foe who has turned Spider-Man's life upside down more than once, and one who knows that Spider-Man is really Peter Parker! Osborn's latest scheme is his most ambitious yet: to make himself mayor of New York. But where many see that as a laudable goal, Spider-Man knows that Osborn's goal is nothing less than absolute power. Spider-Man can defeat the Green Goblin, but Osborn refuses to act himself, preferring to remain above the fray and let the mercenaries known as the Rat Pack do his dirty work. The wall-crawler must find a way to stop Osborn's machinations before it's too late!
Thank you to whoever mentioned Kavalier and Clay (I’m not going to scroll all the way back up there to find out who). Subsequent posts mentioned the “jewishness” of Superman and the Golem, both central themes in the novel. Its one of my favorite books of all time and a solid exploration of the early evolution of american superhero culture, as well as “jewishness” in america during WWII.
The practice may have originated in a Celtic festival, held on 31 October–1 November, to mark the beginning of winter. It was called Samhain in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, and Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Cornwall and Brittany. The festival is believed to have pre-Christian roots. After the Christianization of Ireland in the 5th century, some of these customs may have been retained in the Christian observance of All Hallows' Eve in that region—which continued to be called Samhain/Calan Gaeaf—blending the traditions of their ancestors with Christian ones.[2][3] It was seen as a liminal time, when the spirits or fairies (the Aos Sí), and the souls of the dead, could more easily come into our world.[4] It was believed that the Aos Sí needed to be propitiated to ensure that the people and their livestock survived the winter.
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