Rocking out a thundering DIY Thor costume you crafted at home is a weekend job. According to Marvel, Thor is the God of lightning and thunder as well as one of the Asgard Lords. A Thor costume must have a red cape (make use of your curtains), a black or silver undershirt, a bulky belt, and boots. Thor’s mighty hammer, known as the Mjölnir, is a must. One of the superpowers he possesses is an ability to produce infinite magical power called Odinforce. No wonder why Thor almost broke Captain America’s shield by throwing the Mjölnir at him. Anyway, you can create a Mjölnir easily out of cardboard. Here’s a quick video on how you can do it.
Digitale transformatie is een vaak voorkomend en veelomvattend begrip. Gelukkig weten wij hier wel raad mee. In een interview met CustomerFirst vertellen onze collega’s, Yvonne de Keijzer en Femke Oosterlinck, wat digitale transformatie voor ons in de praktijk betekent. Co-creatie en de combinatie mensen en technologie zijn bepalend om de ultieme klantrelatie- en beleving te...
Dressing up in costumes and going "guising" was prevalent in Ireland and Scotland at Halloween by the late 19th century.[125] Costuming became popular for Halloween parties in the US in the early 20th century, as often for adults as for children. The first mass-produced Halloween costumes appeared in stores in the 1930s when trick-or-treating was becoming popular in the United States.

Throughout Ireland and Britain, the household festivities included rituals and games intended to foretell one's future, especially regarding death and marriage.[57] Apples and nuts were often used in these divination rituals. They included apple bobbing, nut roasting, scrying or mirror-gazing, pouring molten lead or egg whites into water, dream interpretation, and others.[58] Special bonfires were lit and there were rituals involving them. Their flames, smoke and ashes were deemed to have protective and cleansing powers, and were also used for divination.[43] In some places, torches lit from the bonfire were carried sunwise around homes and fields to protect them.[42] It is suggested that the fires were a kind of imitative or sympathetic magic – they mimicked the Sun, helping the "powers of growth" and holding back the decay and darkness of winter.[54][59][60] In Scotland, these bonfires and divination games were banned by the church elders in some parishes.[61] In Wales, bonfires were lit to "prevent the souls of the dead from falling to earth".[62] Later, these bonfires served to keep "away the devil".[63]

Many superheroes have a secret identity, and wear a costume or uniform to help conceal that identity. The costume usually has a logo or symbol as part of its design. Sometimes the costume/uniform incorporates special equipment, tools or technology. For example: Iron Man's armor suit, Captain America's vibranium shield, Spider-Man's web-shooters.   
There have been controversial costumes over the years. One that sparked enormous controversy well before Halloween 2015 is a "Caitlyn Jenner" corset costume. Despite public outcry claiming that the costume is offensive, popular retailers plan to go full steam ahead with selling the costume; one defending their conviction to sell the costume as a celebration of Jenner.[30]
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