Betty Brant: Betty takes over her mother's former position as Daily Bugle secretary after she dies. Peter dates Betty Brant for a while, but they break up due to her blaming Spider-Man for the death of her brother. She later marries Daily Bugle reporter Ned Leeds, although she briefly gets back with Peter after the breakdown of her marriage. Despite this, both Betty and Peter maintain a close friendship.
I thought of something else that has to be considered in the rise of the superhero. As Joe Crawford notes, superhero comics and science fiction hit the mainstream together, sharing creators, distributers, and reading publics. Both deal with science and technology and their effects in society — in a characteristically (for the ’30s) optimistic manner. A man will come from a faraway planet and act as the world’s protector; another will use his wealth and brilliance to develop tools that will be used to fight crime in the streets. No problem — even those caused by science and technology — can not be solved by the application of science and technology. By the ’50s, with the advent of nuclear technology and the revelations of the Holocaust, this optimism is somewhat tempered — the new crop of superheros that emerged in the decades after WWII (Hulk, X-Men, Spiderman) were hunted, persecuted, plagued by superpowers they did not want, which they carried as a burden (and of course the resurgence of Batman and Superman put them into a similar mold).
On "In Darkness Dwells," it is shown that there's an infrared scope built within the cowl, along with a rebreather that can be folded within it. There's a wireless relay communicator in the cowl. Its signals are locked with quantum cryptology and bounced through a dozen different satellites (presumably the WayneComs). As per the animation styles, the suit varies between versions of the Batman Begins standard black suit and the Comic Book original.
Supported by a system similar to that of Tony Stark's classic Iron Man design, The Iron Spider armor features many gadgets, including four mechanical spider-arms, or "waldoes", that can be used to see around corners (via cameras in the tips) and to manipulate objects indirectly. Stark describes them as too delicate to use in combat, yet Spider-Man shortly afterward uses them to smash through the sensors in Titanium Man's helmet. Later on during the "Civil War" storyline, he uses them (reluctantly) during his fight with Captain America.

Anthony "Henry" Harper (appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man, voiced by David Lodge): Nothing much is known about District Attorney Henry Harper's past. In one side-mission in the game, he is kidnapped by Iguana and is dragged into the sewers through the train docking station. After saving a civilian, Spider-Man learns that Harper was a pawn for Oscorp. After Spider-Man defeats Iguana, Harper is rescued and he escapes out of the sewers. Sometime before the events of the game, Harper had focused on exposing Quest Aerospace's evil schemes after he successfully prosecuted some of the city's most notorious criminals. The corrupt corporation lost millions of dollars to Harper, but they fired back when they had evidence of funds contributed to the D.A.'s reelection campaign were sourced by Oscorp Industries. These allegations were never revealed, but Harper's reputation was severely damaged in the eyes of many citizens. He is not seen in The Amazing Spider-Man 2, but he is mentioned when Spider-Man tells the Shocker that he could get into protective custody in exchange for telling Harper about the gang war.
furthermore, to my knowledge Superman did not at all debut in 1928 but rather in 1938. Detective Comics (the U.S.A.’s first widely distributed super-hero comic book printing house) started up with Batman in 1935, though this may have been in response to numerous small press releases of other Batman-ish books like The Phantom and other detective pulp in the couple of years previous.
Jump up ^ Books & Culture: A Christian Review. Christianity Today. 1999. p. 12. Archived from the original on 23 April 2016. Sometimes enacted as at village pageants, the danse macabre was also performed as court masques, the courtiers dressing up as corpses from various strata of society...both the name and the observance began liturgically as All Hallows' Eve.

The practice may have originated in a Celtic festival, held on 31 October–1 November, to mark the beginning of winter. It was called Samhain in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, and Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Cornwall and Brittany. The festival is believed to have pre-Christian roots. After the Christianization of Ireland in the 5th century, some of these customs may have been retained in the Christian observance of All Hallows' Eve in that region—which continued to be called Samhain/Calan Gaeaf—blending the traditions of their ancestors with Christian ones.[2][3] It was seen as a liminal time, when the spirits or fairies (the Aos Sí), and the souls of the dead, could more easily come into our world.[4] It was believed that the Aos Sí needed to be propitiated to ensure that the people and their livestock survived the winter.
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