The earliest superhero I could find reference to was Mandrake the Magician, who debuted in 1934, four years before Superman, who was probably the first popular superhero. Mandrake’s super power was his ability to “make people believe anything, simply by gesturing hypnotically”. Does anyone out there know of any superheroes who made an earlier media appearance?

In 1991, Sega released the first Spider-Man arcade game titled Spider-Man: The Video Game. Sega also released The Amazing Spider-Man vs. The Kingpin the same year. The Nintendo home consoles were late to the Spider-Man party, but they saw many Spider-Man titles themselves. The first was Spider-Man: Return of the Sinister Six, released in 1992 and considered by some to be one of the worst Spider-Man games of all time. Not all Spider-Man titles followed original story lines. In 1994, Spider-Man and Venom: Maximum Carnage was released for the Super Nintendo and the Sega Genesis. The game closely followed the Maximum Carnage Story Arc. 1995 gave us Spider-Man and Venom: Separation Anxiety, which was released on the Sega Genesis, the Super Nintendo and the PC. That same year, Spider-Man: The Animated Series was released for the Genesis and the Super Nintendo; it followed the storyline of the series, with most of the characters being represented the way they were in the cartoon. The next Spider-Man game, Spider-Man: Web of Fire, was released for the Sega 32X. This game is one of rarest and most valuable Spider-Man games to date. For the next couple of years, no game completely dedicated to Spider-Man was released. However, in 1995 he made his fighting game debut in Capcom's Marvel Super Heroes arcade game (which was later ported to the Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn). He returned for the 1997 sequel Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter (which later ported to the Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn) and its 1998 followup, Marvel vs. Capcom: Clash of Super Heroes (which was later ported to the Sega Dreamcast and Sony PlayStation).

Run Forrest, run! So, you might not be ready to run across the country (and then back again) but that's no reason you can't rock the shaggy bearded look of Forrest Gump when he "just felt like running." With gym shorts and a shirt styled directly from the movie, this costume also includes an ever-popular Bubba Gump hat, along with the signature long beard and wig set. This officially licensed set is perfect for any movie buff.
In 1991, Sega released the first Spider-Man arcade game titled Spider-Man: The Video Game. Sega also released The Amazing Spider-Man vs. The Kingpin the same year. The Nintendo home consoles were late to the Spider-Man party, but they saw many Spider-Man titles themselves. The first was Spider-Man: Return of the Sinister Six, released in 1992 and considered by some to be one of the worst Spider-Man games of all time. Not all Spider-Man titles followed original story lines. In 1994, Spider-Man and Venom: Maximum Carnage was released for the Super Nintendo and the Sega Genesis. The game closely followed the Maximum Carnage Story Arc. 1995 gave us Spider-Man and Venom: Separation Anxiety, which was released on the Sega Genesis, the Super Nintendo and the PC. That same year, Spider-Man: The Animated Series was released for the Genesis and the Super Nintendo; it followed the storyline of the series, with most of the characters being represented the way they were in the cartoon. The next Spider-Man game, Spider-Man: Web of Fire, was released for the Sega 32X. This game is one of rarest and most valuable Spider-Man games to date. For the next couple of years, no game completely dedicated to Spider-Man was released. However, in 1995 he made his fighting game debut in Capcom's Marvel Super Heroes arcade game (which was later ported to the Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn). He returned for the 1997 sequel Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter (which later ported to the Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn) and its 1998 followup, Marvel vs. Capcom: Clash of Super Heroes (which was later ported to the Sega Dreamcast and Sony PlayStation).
What if someone else besides Spider-Man had been bitten by the radioactive spider explores what would have happened if Flash Thompson, Betty Brant or John Jameson were bitten by the spider, but all three prove to be failures as the 'new' Spider-Man. Each story ends with Peter extracting the residual radioactive venom from the dead spider and using it to create a serum to give himself powers, thus becoming Spider-Man.[47] Versions of all three appear in Spider-Verse where John is the only one that isn't killed by the Inheritors.[citation needed]
Bob mentioned the epic Ramayana, which is itself the story of a “superhero” — the god Rama, who does some pretty nifty stunts, along with his brother Lakshama and monkey hero side-kick Hanuman (my personal favorite). I think he’s probably right about Asia being the earliest origins of superheroism; Hinduism is one of the world’s oldest religions and it’s full of larger-than-life men/gods who right wrongs and fight for truth and justice.
The following day, Peter learns from Doctor Strange that the psychic blindspot put in place to defend his secret identity has been destroyed, because of a viral video of spider-powered Peter defending people. Carlie deduces who Peter is and promptly breaks up with him for lying to her. Mary Jane admits her love for Peter, and Peter administers an antidote to her. The two look up at the Empire Stats Building, which is projecting a red and blue light, thanking Spider-Man for his heroic deeds.
The sonar lenses in the first sequel remain the only attempt to add somewhat white lenses to the standard cowl in the live-action movies. A very similar sonar lenses idea was used at the end of Batman Forever, although with a very different look to the lenses. The sonar batsuit worn by Val Kilmer was also used to screentest actors like Cillian Murphy for the first movie. Ben Affleck's power armor in Batman v Superman also had glowing whiteish-blue lcd light eyes.

When night falls in South Park, Cartman takes up the call and dons the Coon costume. This fearless crime fighter is the only one who can sort through the trash can of society. As the founder of Coon and Friends, the Coon is the mastermind behind the greatest superhero franchise of all time and will stop at nothing to see it realized. Thinks Eric Cartman is handsome and cool.
Working through his grief, Parker eventually develops tentative feelings toward Watson, and the two "become confidants rather than lovers".[62] A romantic relationship eventually develops, with Parker proposing to her in issue #182 (July 1978), and being turned down an issue later.[63] Parker went on to graduate from college in issue #185,[49] and becomes involved with the shy Debra Whitman and the extroverted, flirtatious costumed thief Felicia Hardy, the Black Cat,[64] whom he meets in issue #194 (July 1979).[49]
Professor Nicholas Christakis lives at Yale, where he presides over one of its undergraduate colleges. His wife Erika, a lecturer in early childhood education, shares that duty. They reside among students and are responsible for shaping residential life. And before Halloween, some students complained to them that Yale administrators were offering heavy-handed advice on what Halloween costumes to avoid.
As Nick Fury and Tony Stark analyze Mysterio's equipment, Fury notes that he is allowing this Peter so much leeway as a way to make up for his failure to protect the Peter he knew. Peter attempts to explain himself to Gwen and May, but it takes Miles arriving to back up his story and convincing them that he is not an impostor or out to play a sick joke on them. Talking with Gwen and Miles in his attic, Peter confirms that Gwen exists in his world without mentioning that her counterpart is dead and also mentions his relationship with Mary Jane, while he in turn is shocked to hear that his counterpart dated Kitty Pryde, although Miles is left curious whether he has a counterpart in Peter's world. As Fury arrives to pick Peter up, Peter sees Mary Jane watching him in the street, but she runs away before he can talk to her. Returning to the Helicarrier, Peter learns that Stark is having trouble determining how he can identify Peter's world of origin amid the multitude of alternate universes in existence. With Miles' help, the Ultimates determine the location of Mysterio's headquarters based on the energy generated by his equipment, prompting the heroes led by Peter to suit up and head for the base.[6]
At the end of the Silver Age, Norman Osborn's memories began to flood back. He decided to hurt Peter as much as possible as the Green Goblin. He kidnapped Gwen Stacy and held her hostage at the Brooklyn Bridge. Spider-Man went to save Gwen and, despite being ill at the time, managed to defeat the Goblin. The Goblin threw Gwen off the bridge and, although Peter caught her by attaching a web line to her leg as she fell, the drop caused her neck to snap. As Spider-Man held Gwen's dead body, he vowed to kill the Goblin. He tracked him down to one of his warehouses. He brutally pummeled the Goblin in a fit of rage but managed to stop himself from committing murder. In one last attempt to achieve victory, Norman sent his Goblin Glider to impale Spider-Man from behind. Peter ducks and the Goblin is apparently killed from being impaled by his own glider. Mary Jane consoled Peter on the death of Gwen and the two started to date. Peter eventually proposed to her, but she refused and ended up breaking up with him. At this time Miles Warren, a college professor obsessed with Gwen became the deranged villain known as the Jackal. He hired the Punisher to kill Spider-Man and he also made copies of both Gwen and Peter. The Peter copy escaped and Gwen's copy eventually went back to Miles. Harry Osborn followed in the footsteps of his father and became the next Green Goblin. He blamed Peter for his father's death. Harry later lost his memory after a fight with Spider-Man. Harry's psychologist, Bart Hamilton attempted to take up the mantle of the Goblin himself but was killed by his own bomb while fighting Peter.
The ideas of second-wave feminism, which spread through the 1960s into the 1970s, greatly influenced the way comic book companies would depict as well as market their female characters: Wonder Woman was for a time revamped as a mod-dressing martial artist directly inspired by the Emma Peel character from the British television series The Avengers (no relation to the superhero team of the same name),[29] but later reverted to Marston's original concept after the editors of Ms. magazine publicly disapproved of the character being depowered and without her traditional costume;[30] Supergirl was moved from being a secondary feature on Action Comics to headline Adventure Comics in 1969; the Lady Liberators appeared in an issue of The Avengers as a group of mind-controlled superheroines led by Valkyrie (actually a disguised supervillainess) and were meant to be a caricatured parody of feminist activists;[31] and Jean Grey became the embodiment of a cosmic being known as the Phoenix Force with seemingly unlimited power in the late 1970s, a stark contrast from her depiction as the weakest member of her team a decade ago.
Jump up ^ Simon, Joe, with Jim Simon. The Comic Book Makers (Crestwood/II, 1990) ISBN 1-887591-35-4. "There were a few holes in Jack's never-dependable memory. For instance, there was no Black Magic involved at all. ... Jack brought in the Spider-Man logo that I had loaned to him before we changed the name to The Silver Spider. Kirby laid out the story to Lee about the kid who finds a ring in a spiderweb, gets his powers from the ring, and goes forth to fight crime armed with The Silver Spider's old web-spinning pistol. Stan Lee said, 'Perfect, just what I want.' After obtaining permission from publisher Martin Goodman, Lee told Kirby to pencil-up an origin story. Kirby... using parts of an old rejected superhero named Night Fighter... revamped the old Silver Spider script, including revisions suggested by Lee. But when Kirby showed Lee the sample pages, it was Lee's turn to gripe. He had been expecting a skinny young kid who is transformed into a skinny young kid with spider powers. Kirby had him turn into... Captain America with cobwebs. He turned Spider-Man over to Steve Ditko, who... ignored Kirby's pages, tossed the character's magic ring, web-pistol and goggles... and completely redesigned Spider-Man's costume and equipment. In this life, he became high-school student Peter Parker, who gets his spider powers after being bitten by a radioactive spider. ... Lastly, the Spider-Man logo was redone and a dashing hyphen added".
You don’t have to be a feminist to understand that the superhero game isn’t exclusively for men. Ladies have been busting up the bad guys for years in the pages of the comics, and they’ve started making a splash on the screen in a big way. If you have your eye on women’s superhero costumes , we’re sure you’ll be amazed with our selection. Check out some of these top picks and see if they give you inspiration in making your choice!
Some superheroes use their powers to counter daily crime while also combating threats against humanity from supervillains, who are their criminal counterparts. Often at least one of these supervillains will be the superhero's archenemy. Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains. There are movies and TV shows featuring various super heroes.

In 1962, with the success of the Fantastic Four, Marvel Comics editor and head writer Stan Lee was casting about for a new superhero idea. He said the idea for Spider-Man arose from a surge in teenage demand for comic books, and the desire to create a character with whom teens could identify.[16]:1 In his autobiography, Lee cites the non-superhuman pulp magazine crime fighter the Spider as a great influence,[15]:130 and in a multitude of print and video interviews, Lee stated he was further inspired by seeing a spider climb up a wall—adding in his autobiography that he has told that story so often he has become unsure of whether or not this is true.[note 1] Although at the time teenage superheroes were usually given names ending with "boy", Lee says he chose "Spider-Man" because he wanted the character to age as the series progressed, and moreover felt the name "Spider-Boy" would have made the character sound inferior to other superheroes.[17] At that time Lee had to get only the consent of Marvel publisher Martin Goodman for the character's approval. In a 1986 interview, Lee described in detail his arguments to overcome Goodman's objections.[note 2] Goodman eventually agreed to a Spider-Man tryout in what Lee in numerous interviews recalled as what would be the final issue of the science-fiction and supernatural anthology series Amazing Adult Fantasy, which was renamed Amazing Fantasy for that single issue, #15 (cover-dated August 1962, on sale June 5, 1962).[18] In particular, Lee stated that the fact that it had already been decided that Amazing Fantasy would be cancelled after issue #15 was the only reason Goodman allowed him to use Spider-Man.[17] While this was indeed the final issue, its editorial page anticipated the comic continuing and that "The Spiderman [sic] ... will appear every month in Amazing."[18][19]

In Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows, a story that has Spider-Man and Mary Jane married with a daughter named Annie (who is developing Spider powers of her own). After being glimpsed at in the "Spider-Verse" storyline,[59] Peter saves his family from Venom while most of the heroes die to Regent. He retires as Spider-Man to avoid detection from Regent and to focus on raising his family. However, he is later forced to don the mask again to stop Regent and protect his family. The second volume of the comic series details the later adventures of Spider-Man and his family.


Something is turning ordinary people into zombie like bank robbers. One of which is a friend of Mary Jane. In Spider-Man’s search for answers, he comes across the aid of Private Detective Barb Lightner, whose partner was killed over a mysterious trinket. These events lead to a new crime boss calling himself the ‘The Jewel’. How he is connected to all this is discovered as the detective and superhero pool their resources to find answers.

The array of devices Batman carries have become more complex over time. The simple coiled rope and Batarang scaling equipment became a rocket-powered (or compressed air powered) grapple gun. The suit has also carried on different occasions a re-breather device, flash and gas grenades, explosives and a detonator, lockpicks, a signaling device for the Batmobile, electronic surveillance equipment (including video camera and monitor), a forensic kit for gathering crime scene evidence, a medical kit, a cache of money and, in early incarnations, a pistol in a holster. On any occasion where Batman anticipates encountering Kryptonians, he has also carried (in a lead case) a Kryptonite Ring, given to him by Superman as a weapon of last resort.
There are different areas in different comic book universes where Spider-Man has organic webbing, which is often shown as being stronger and more long lasting than his synthetic variants. Spider Man has organic webbing from the movies (of course) and 616 (end of civil war, back in black, etc.) Spider Man also has organic webbing in the 2099 universe. It seems the strength of his webbing relates directly to his health.
Eerder dit jaar zeiden we het al: het chatbot-tijdperk neemt een vlucht in 2018. De typische vraag-antwoord-bots kennen we inmiddels allemaal. Maar de vraag is waar de kansen van AI liggen bij ‘complex’ klantcontact, bijvoorbeeld in geval van een klacht, technisch support of voor aankoopadvies. Consumenten willen veelal goed, snel en persoonlijk geholpen worden, maar welke rol...

Halloweiner · Horrific Head of Hare · Hound's Hood · Face Plante · Faun Feet · Sprinting Cephalopod · Terrier Trousers ·  Cadaver's Capper · Freedom Feathers · Hardium Helm · Hidden Dragon · Larval Lid · Spellbinder's Bonnet · Faux Manchu · Grub Grenades · Jupiter Jumpers · Lieutenant Bites the Dust · Shaolin Sash · Space Bracers · Bozo's Bouffant · Burny's Boney Bonnet · Corpsemopolitan · Crispy Golden Locks · Gothic Guise · Macabre Mask · Mucous Membrain · Raven's Visage · Spectralnaut · Abhorrent Appendages · Beast from Below · Carrion Companion · Cauterizer's Caudal Appendage · Creature From The Heap · Death Support Pack · External Organ · Glob · Grisly Gumbo · Handhunter · Hard-Headed Hardware · Hollowhead · Maniac's Manacles · Monster's Stompers · PY-40 Incinibot · Rugged Respirator · Scorched Skirt · Up Pyroscopes · Vicious Visage ·  Headtaker's Hood · Mann-Bird of Aberdeen · Squid's Lid · Transylvania Top · Cap'n Calamari · Horsemann's Hand-Me-Down · Lordly Lapels · Parasight · Polly Putrid ·  Ivan The Inedible · Last Bite · Monstrous Mandible · Chicken Kiev · Horned Honcho ·  Grease Monkey ·  Alternative Medicine Mann · Das Blutliebhaber · Medimedes · Shaman's Skull · Teutonkahmun · Trepanabotomizer · Archimedes the Undying · Lo-Grav Loafers · Ramses' Regalia · Second Opinion · Surgeon's Space Suit · Vicar's Vestments ·  Carious Chameleon · Hallowed Headcase · Sir Shootsalot · Candyman's Cap · Hyperbaric Bowler · Bountiful Bow · Bozo's Brogues · Foul Cowl ·  Baphomet Trotters ·  Candleer ·  Pin Pals ·  Snaggletoothed Stetson ·  Ethereal Hood · Birdie Bonnet · Dark Helm · Haunted Hat · Magical Mercenary · Manneater · One-Way Ticket · Tuque or Treat · Accursed Apparition · Beacon from Beyond · Cryptic Keepsake · Guano · Pocket Horsemann · Quoth · Sackcloth Spook · Unidentified Following Object


Unlike well known rivalries in comics book depictions where heroes always still have more than one enemy but usually one archenemy (e.g., Joker, to Batman in DC Comics, Red Skull to Captain America, Doctor Doom to the Fantastic Four and the Brotherhood of Mutants to the X-Men in Marvel Comics etc.), Spider-Man is known to have three archenemies and it can be debated or disputed as to which one is worse:[123]
Parker's daughter May is returned to him and Mary Jane, but he continues as Spider-Man. He loses a leg fighting the Green Goblin, gives up on superheroics and joins the police. He has trouble dealing with his daughter taking up the family business as Spider-Girl, though he supports her and occasionally aids her as Spider-Man. He and Mary Jane have one other child, Benjy.
In the pages of Contest of Champions, a variation of Natasha Romanov donned the Iron Spider identity in an unidentified alternate reality where Iron Man used the Reality Gem to rig the Civil War in his favor where he later became President of the United States. She inherited it after Peter defected to Captain America's side and later became a member of the Civil Warriors.[10]
Created in 1190 during the Crusades, the Suit of Sorrows was bestowed upon Batman by Talia al Ghul as a gift, and although it made him significantly stronger and faster, he was forced to stop using it when he began to believe it was somehow corrupting him and making him more violent. However, Batman was unable to bring himself to destroy the artifact and instead chose to store it on display in the Batcave.
Follow Spider-Man’s action-packed journey, from his struggle to harness the extraordinary gifts that will prove to be both blessing and curse, to his fight to save innocent lives while the media tears him to pieces. It all leads up to his ultimate battle high above New York streets, against the death-dealing madman known as the Green Goblin. While the city watches helplessly and countless lives hang in the balance, Spider-Man confronts his archnemesis, and the Goblin puts Spider-Man’s vow to fight crime to the ultimate test...

In keeping with their origins as representing the archetypical hero stock character in 1930s American comics, superheroes are predominantly depicted as white Anglo-Saxon American middle- or upper-class heterosexual young adult males who are typically tall, athletic, educated, physically attractive and in perfect health. Beginning in the 1960s with the civil rights movement in the United States, and increasingly with the rising concern over political correctness in the 1980s, superhero fiction centered on cultural, ethnic, national, racial and language minority groups (from the perspective of US demographics) began to be produced. This began with depiction of black superheroes in the 1960s, followed in the 1970s with a number of other ethnic superheroes.[51] In keeping with the political mood of the time, cultural diversity and inclusivism would be an important part of superhero groups starting from the 1980s. In the 1990s, this was further augmented by the first depictions of superheroes as homosexual. In 2017, Sign Gene emerged, the first group of deaf superheroes with superpowers through the use of sign language.[52]


^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 26. ISBN 978-0756692360. Spider-Man's arch nemesis, the Green Goblin, as introduced to readers as the 'most dangerous foe Spidey's ever fought.' Writer Stan Lee and artist Steve Ditko had no way of knowing how true that statement would prove to be in the coming years.

Sophia "Chat" Sanduval: A mutant known as Chat from the Marvel Adventures Spider-Man who appeared in issue 53 and is best friends with this version's Emma Frost. She has the power to talk to animals. She is one of the few people who knows Spider-Man's identity and has developed deep feelings for him. She and Peter begin dating, meanwhile Emma (with her own crush on Peter) shakes their relationship. Eventually, Chat becomes Peter's girlfriend.
The Iron Spider armor also has a secret override that can be activated by Iron Man in case of emergencies or if Spider-Man ever switches sides (which he does in Civil War #5). However, unknown to Stark, Peter was already aware of the safety measure and had bypassed it with his own override, Password Surprise. Perhaps most sinister, Stark discovered a way to give his own Iron Man armor a "spider-sense" based on Peter's, and the ability to give Spider-Man's sense red herrings.
To create a zombie costume, first make your clothes look old and tattered. Try using a 1:1 bleach solution to fade clothes or make them look worn out by running a grater over areas to create small tears. Make some fake blood with corn syrup, red food coloring, and chocolate syrup to spatter on your clothes so you’ll look bloody and gory! Remember to zombify your face and hair, too, using dark purplish-brown makeup around your eye socket and eyelids so your eyes look sunken in, for example.
The true identity of this Captain Universe was never revealed but the host had more than likely had the Uni-Power for several years. During the battle that ensued between the Law Enforcement Squad and the Fantastic Four; Captain Universe and Dr. Druid ganged up on Reed Richards in order to destabilize the Fantastic Four's cohesion as a team. With only seconds to spare, Reed convinces Captain Universe that something is out of place and that the Fantastic Four are not his enemies. Captain Universe reveals to Druid that Reed is telling the truth, but before he can convince the others to stop fighting, he is struck down by Nova.
Following the death of Ben Parker, Peter, and May faced a great deal of financial difficulties. With Aunt May being rather weak, Peter decided to become the breadwinner of the household, despite Aunt May asking that Peter instead focus on his studies. Peter considered using his Spider-Man identity for crime but decided against it, both for moral reasons, but also because he knew it would hurt Aunt May if he went to prison.
The costume and the equipment are different from the original, especially the costume that is made up of a normal dress of the era matched with a coat; The basic aspect of the costume is the mask made with the headgear and the aviator glasses used by his uncle during the Great War and the costume made in kevlar can withstand bullets and explosions.[2] He is shown to be a skilled marksman, being adept in the use of firearms and also uses a variety of such weapons including a revolver and a tommy gun to severely injure or kill criminals.[3]
Jump up ^ Cleene, Marcel. Compendium of Symbolic and Ritual Plants in Europe. Man & Culture, 2002. p.108. Quote: "Soul cakes were small cakes baked as food for the deceased or offered for the salvation of their souls. They were therefore offered at funerals and feasts of the dead, laid on graves, or given to the poor as representatives of the dead. The baking of these soul cakes is a universal practice".
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