Jump up ^ Jackson, Jeanne L. (1 January 1995). Red Letter Days: The Christian Year in Story for Primary Assembly. Nelson Thornes. p. 158. ISBN 9780748719341. Later, it became the custom for poorer Christians to offer prayers for the dead, in return for money or food (soul cakes) from their wealthier neighbours. People would go 'souling' - rather like carol singing - requesting alms or soul cakes: 'A soul, a soul, a soul cake, Please to give us a soul cake, One for Peter, two for Paul, have mercy on us Christians all.'

Carlie Cooper: She is an officer of the NYPD's Crime Scene Unit and ex-best friend of Harry Osborn's ex-girlfriend, Lily Hollister. She had also been friends with Gwen Stacy. At Harry Osborn's goodbye party Peter asks her to be his girlfriend and the two share their first kiss. However they break up after Spider Island due to surmising that Peter was Spider-Man, and was angry that he'd lied to her.[4] Carlie eventually left New York for her own safety.[5]


The costume and the equipment are different from the original, especially the costume that is made up of a normal dress of the era matched with a coat; The basic aspect of the costume is the mask made with the headgear and the aviator glasses used by his uncle during the Great War and the costume made in kevlar can withstand bullets and explosions.[2] He is shown to be a skilled marksman, being adept in the use of firearms and also uses a variety of such weapons including a revolver and a tommy gun to severely injure or kill criminals.[3]
Regardless, Lee received Goodman's approval for the name Spider-Man and the "ordinary teen" concept and approached artist Jack Kirby. As comics historian Greg Theakston recounts, Kirby told Lee about an unpublished character on which he had collaborated with Joe Simon in the 1950s, in which an orphaned boy living with an old couple finds a magic ring that granted him superhuman powers. Lee and Kirby "immediately sat down for a story conference", Theakston writes, and Lee afterward directed Kirby to flesh out the character and draw some pages.[20] Steve Ditko would be the inker.[note 3] When Kirby showed Lee the first six pages, Lee recalled, "I hated the way he was doing it! Not that he did it badly—it just wasn't the character I wanted; it was too heroic".[20]:12 Lee turned to Ditko, who developed a visual style Lee found satisfactory. Ditko recalled:
Spider-Man has had a large range of supporting characters introduced in the comics that are essential in the issues and storylines that star him. After his parents died, Peter Parker was raised by his loving aunt, May Parker, and his uncle and father figure, Ben Parker. After Uncle Ben is murdered by a burglar, Aunt May is virtually Peter's only family, and she and Peter are very close.[45]
A bite from a radioactive spider on a school field trip causes a variety of changes in the body of Peter Parker and gives him superpowers. In the original Lee-Ditko stories, Spider-Man has the ability to cling to walls, superhuman strength, a sixth sense ("spider-sense") that alerts him of danger, perfect balance and equilibrium, as well as superhuman speed and agility. Some of his comic series have him shooting webs from his wrists. Academically brilliant, Parker has expertise in the fields of applied, chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, mathematics, and mechanics. The character was originally conceived by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko as intellectually gifted, but not a genius; however, later writers have depicted the character as a genius. With his talents, he sews his own costume to conceal his identity, and constructs many devices that complement his powers, most notably mechanical web-shooters. This mechanism ejects an advanced adhesive, releasing web-fluid in a variety of configurations, including a single rope-like strand to swing from, a net to bind enemies, and a simple glob to foul machinery or blind an opponent. He can also weave the web material into simple forms like a shield, a spherical protection or hemispherical barrier, a club, or a hang-glider wing. Other equipment include spider-tracers (spider-shaped adhesive homing beacons keyed to his own spider-sense), a light beacon which can either be used as a flashlight or project a "Spider-Signal" design, and a specially modified camera that can take pictures automatically.
“Parents who wonder why college tuition is so high and why it increases so much each year may be less than pleased to learn that their sons and daughters will have an opportunity to interact with more administrators and staffers—but not more professors,” Benjamin Ginsberg observed in Washington Monthly back in 2011. “For many of these career managers, promoting teaching and research is less important than expanding their own administrative domains.” All over America, dispensing Halloween costume advice is now an annual ritual performed by college administrators.
Parker's daughter May is returned to him and Mary Jane, but he continues as Spider-Man. He loses a leg fighting the Green Goblin, gives up on superheroics and joins the police. He has trouble dealing with his daughter taking up the family business as Spider-Girl, though he supports her and occasionally aids her as Spider-Man. He and Mary Jane have one other child, Benjy.
The heart of the Night of Light is an all-night vigil of prayer, but there is room for children's fun too: sweets, perhaps a bonfire and dressing up as St George or St Lucy. The minimum gesture is to put a lighted candle in the window, which is in itself too exciting for some proponents of health and safety. The inventor of the Night of Light is Damian Stayne, the founder of a year-round religious community called Cor et Lumen Christi – heart and light of Christ. This new movement is Catholic, orthodox and charismatic – emphasising the work of the Holy Spirit.
After defeating Joey Spider-Man’s fame rose further. One day after seeing his aunt continue to struggle with the household finances, Peter finally decided he had to bring in some money. He contacted Maxie Shiffman who booked him an interview on a TV show. Spider-Man was given the slot of astronaut John Jameson much to the vexation of his father, publicist J. Jonah Jameson. As the host began to introducing the show’s guests he was attacked by the super powered villain Supercharger, who announced he will kill everyone in the audience to prove how dangerous super powered beings were. Spider-Man had never encountered a super villain before and thought real super heroes should deal with this. He attempted to call The Fantastic Four but after Supercharger attacked someone in the audience, Spider-Man stepped in and defeated his first super villain. “because that’s what super heroes do”.

The basic foundation of the Batsuit is a tight-fitting bodysuit, similar to many superheroes. In early depictions, it was similar to the garb of early 20thcentury circus performers. Batman #1 revealed that there is a ballistic vest sewn into the costume. In modern depictions, the briefs are integrated into the main costume, so that section of the costume constitutes only a seam and color change from the rest of the suit. The bodysuit has varied in color and style as depicted by different artists.
Some Yalies are defending their broken activist culture by seizing on more defensible reasons for being upset. “The protests are not really about Halloween costumes or a frat party,” Yale senior Aaron Lewis writes. “They’re about a mismatch between the Yale we find in admissions brochures and the Yale we experience every day. They’re about real experiences with racism on this campus that have gone unacknowledged for far too long. The university sells itself as a welcoming and inclusive place for people of all backgrounds. Unfortunately, it often isn’t.”
After the " Other" story arc, Tony Stark designed for Peter a specialized Red & Gold costume that is similar to Tony Stark's Iron Man costume. It was designated as Spider-Man Armored Fighting suit Version 1.1 which was made of a liquid nano-fiber. It provided Peter with the added functions of a short-ranged gliding function, increased strength, heat-resistant Kevlar microfiber that provided resistance to small caliber bullets, built-in fire, police and emergency scanners, visual amplifications such as infrared and ultraviolet, carbon filter in the mouth to prevent inhalation of airborne toxins, and a short-range GPS microwave communication system. All of which are controlled in the computerized control system in the titanium chest piece in the costume. Another very useful addition was a stealth mode which allowed Spider-Man to blend with the environment or even disappear completely in some backgrounds. Along with this came the customization option to instantly switch between any former style he's worn (Spidey suit, black suit, normal clothes, etc); all on the same suit. It also contained three retractable spider legs called "waldoes" which can be used as offensive weapons. Spidey wore this costume before and during the Civil War but Tony, in order to keep an eye on Peter, had the costume feed him with information about Peter, notably the Spider-Sense. When Peter revealed that he was going to switch sides and fought Iron Man, the latter used a voice activated override which incapacitated Peter for a while. He had already known about this and used his computer expertise to disable the override and managed to defeat Iron Man with a surprise attack. He then discarded the costume and returned to wear his original costume when he joined Captain America's team during the Civil War. The members of the initiative team known as the Scarlet Spiders would start wearing costumes of similar design and functions.
As with Spider-Man, the villains' powers originate with scientific accidents or the misuse of scientific technology and also tend to have animal-themed costumes or powers (Vulture, Doctor Octopus, Beetle, Lizard, Rhino, Scorpion, Jackal and Black Cat). There also are supervillains with the powers over the elements (Sandman, Shocker, Electro, Molten Man and Hydro-Man), some that are horror-themed (the Goblins, Morbius, Morlun, and the Symbiotes) some that are crime lords (Kingpin, Tinkerer, Tombstone, Hammerhead, Silvermane and Mister Negative),[1] and some that are masters of trickery (Chameleon and Mysterio).[2] These villains oftentimes form teams such as the Sinister Six to oppose the superhero.

Digitale transformatie is een vaak voorkomend en veelomvattend begrip. Gelukkig weten wij hier wel raad mee. In een interview met CustomerFirst vertellen onze collega’s, Yvonne de Keijzer en Femke Oosterlinck, wat digitale transformatie voor ons in de praktijk betekent. Co-creatie en de combinatie mensen en technologie zijn bepalend om de ultieme klantrelatie- en beleving te...
Captain Universe was the starring feature in issues #9-11 of the tryout series Marvel Spotlight. Marvel Spotlight editor Al Milgrom recalled being taken away by the concept of a Captain Universe serial: "You could come up with three issues, three disparate individuals - each one very different from the other - and see how they use their powers. They wouldn't necessarily be superheroic types; they'd be regular people who fell into the powers for just one issue. ... But Captain Universe never got his own title, so I'm guessing it didn't sell terribly well."[1] The character appeared sporadically through the remainder of the 1980s in titles such as Marvel Fanfare and Contest of Champions.
In Batman: The Animated Series (1992–1995) the Batsuit is based on the "New Look" costume. The cape, cowl, gloves, briefs, and boots are dark blue, as indicated by the highlight. Occasionally the cape and cowl are also shown to be one piece and when he's not fighting, the cape sometimes resembles a cloak, draped over Batman's body. The costume lacks any armor qualities, instead of being merely a bodysuit with no apparent special features and it often becomes torn in serious fights. It is occasionally seen packed in Bruce Wayne's luggage or in his vehicles, and it is made clear that he has numerous spares.
On Earth-50701 Spider-Man is abducted by an alien scientist and injected with a mysterious drug that corrupts him and causes him to attack fellow abductee The Thing. He is attacked by the Human Torch and Storm, both also corrupted, and in the scuffle is wounded, causing him to bleed the drug out of his system, returning him to normal. He is returned home, and later joins other heroes in fighting the scientist's Imperfects and their invasion attempts.
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Jump up ^ "Vigil of All Saints". Catholic News Agency. 31 October 2012. Archived from the original on 24 May 2013. Retrieved 1 November 2011. The Vigil is based on the monastic office of Vigils (or Matins), when the monks would arise in the middle of the night to pray. On major feast days, they would have an extended service of readings (scriptural, patristic, and from lives of the saints) in addition to chanting the psalms. This all would be done in the dark, of course, and was an opportunity to listen carefully to the Word of God as well as the words of the Church Fathers and great saints. The Vigil of All Saints is an adaptation of this ancient practice, using the canonical office of Compline at the end.
Although supposedly designed for maximum flexibility and movement, the Nomex armor does restrict Batman's movement somewhat, slowing him down in combat. The design of the mask and cape also restricted his neck movement, making it impossible for him to turn his head, and forcing him to rely on peripheral vision. For these reasons, Bruce asked Lucius to design a new suit with faster, freer movement in mind.
In Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows, a story that has Spider-Man and Mary Jane married with a daughter named Annie (who is developing Spider powers of her own). After being glimpsed at in the "Spider-Verse" storyline,[59] Peter saves his family from Venom while most of the heroes die to Regent. He retires as Spider-Man to avoid detection from Regent and to focus on raising his family. However, he is later forced to don the mask again to stop Regent and protect his family. The second volume of the comic series details the later adventures of Spider-Man and his family.
Captain Universe later returned, and the Uni-Power possesses various heroes (the Hulk; X-23; Daredevil, who regained his sight while possessed; the Invisible Woman; Gladiator; and the Silver Surfer); all in a mission to restore its power which has been severely weakened from a mysterious force emanating from the darkest corners of the Microverse. Using the copied powers of each hero, it took paraplegic war veteran Gabriel Vargas as its host to face the one responsible for its weakening.
By most definitions, characters do not require actual superhuman powers or phenomena to be deemed superheroes.[1][2][3] While the Dictionary.com definition of "superhero" is "a figure, especially in a comic strip or cartoon, endowed with superhuman powers and usually portrayed as fighting evil or crime",[4] the longstanding Merriam-Webster dictionary gives the definition as "a fictional hero having extraordinary or superhuman powers; also: an exceptionally skillful or successful person".[5] Terms such as masked crime fighters, costumed adventurers or masked vigilantes are sometimes used to refer to characters such as the Spirit, who may not be explicitly referred to as superheroes but nevertheless share similar traits.
Following the camp depiction of the 1960s live-action television series, director Tim Burton's Batman films feature an all-black Batsuit with bright yellow chest emblem, brass utility belt, heavy armor placed on the chest, forearms, and boots, with the chest armor incorporating the bat-emblem. This became the basic template on which all subsequent live-action Batsuits were based. 

On route home after a night's drinking, Jack encounters the Devil and tricks him into climbing a tree. A quick-thinking Jack etches the sign of the cross into the bark, thus trapping the Devil. Jack strikes a bargain that Satan can never claim his soul. After a life of sin, drink, and mendacity, Jack is refused entry to heaven when he dies. Keeping his promise, the Devil refuses to let Jack into hell and throws a live coal straight from the fires of hell at him. It was a cold night, so Jack places the coal in a hollowed out turnip to stop it from going out, since which time Jack and his lantern have been roaming looking for a place to rest.[123]
That isn’t to dismiss all complaints by Yale students. If contested claims that black students were turned away from a party due to their skin color are true, for example, that is outrageous. If any discrete group of students is ever discriminated against, or disproportionately victimized by campus crime, or graded more harshly by professors, then of course students should protest and remedies should be implemented.
The ideas of second-wave feminism, which spread through the 1960s into the 1970s, greatly influenced the way comic book companies would depict as well as market their female characters: Wonder Woman was for a time revamped as a mod-dressing martial artist directly inspired by the Emma Peel character from the British television series The Avengers (no relation to the superhero team of the same name),[29] but later reverted to Marston's original concept after the editors of Ms. magazine publicly disapproved of the character being depowered and without her traditional costume;[30] Supergirl was moved from being a secondary feature on Action Comics to headline Adventure Comics in 1969; the Lady Liberators appeared in an issue of The Avengers as a group of mind-controlled superheroines led by Valkyrie (actually a disguised supervillainess) and were meant to be a caricatured parody of feminist activists;[31] and Jean Grey became the embodiment of a cosmic being known as the Phoenix Force with seemingly unlimited power in the late 1970s, a stark contrast from her depiction as the weakest member of her team a decade ago.
In order to censor the Daily Bugle, Osborn kidnaps the editor J. Jonah Jameson and has the Chameleon assume his place. The Chameleon-as-Jameson goes to Urich’s apartment and shoots him, unaware that Felicia witnessed the murder. Hardy goes to the Daily Bugle offices and kills the Chameleon, leaving his body to be discovered by Spider-Man shortly before the arrival of the police.[3] Spider-Man escapes the attentions of the police and goes to his home, where he killed the Vulture, in order to stop him from murdering Aunt Parker. Despite saving his aunt, May criticized him for killing the Vulture, as he could have stopped him with his powers. She told Peter that killing people would make him less of what makes him human.[4]
In the 1930s, both trends came together in some of the earliest superpowered costumed heroes such as Japan's Ōgon Bat[9][10] (visualized in painted panels used by kamishibai oral storytellers in Japan since 1931), Mandrake the Magician[11][12][13] (1934), Superman in 1938 and Captain Marvel (1939) at the beginning of the Golden Age of Comic Books. The precise era of the Golden Age of Comic Books is disputed, though most agree that it was started with the launch of Superman in 1938.[14] Superman remains one of the most recognizable Superheroes to this day.[14] The success of Superman spawned a whole new genre of characters with secret identities and superhuman powers – the Superhero genre.[14]

Family owned and operated for over 65 years, Rubie’s Costume Company is the largest designer, manufacturer and distributor of Halloween costumes and accessories in the world! We remain true to our founders’ vision by continually offering innovative products and a variety of styles for the whole family to enjoy, including pets! With the 3rd generation playing such an integral role in our future, we’re confident Halloween with Rubie’s will continue to flourish for years to come.
Hundreds of Yale students have now signed an open letter to Erika Christakis that is alarming in its own right, not least because it is so poorly reasoned. “Your email equates old traditions of using harmful stereotypes and tropes to further degrade marginalized people, to preschoolers playing make believe,” the letter inaccurately summarizes. “This both trivializes the harm done by these tropes and infantilizes the student body to which the request was made.” Up is down. The person saying that adult men and women should work Halloween out among themselves is accused of infantilizing them. “You fail to distinguish the difference between cosplaying fictional characters and misrepresenting actual groups of people,” the letter continues, though Erika Christakis specifically wrote in her Halloween email, “I suppose we could agree that there is a difference between fantasizing about an individual character vs. appropriating a culture, wholesale, the latter of which could be seen as (tacky)(offensive)(jejeune)(hurtful), take your pick.”

Diamond Collectibles has been released a number of Spider-Man figures for the Marvel Select line. They initially released an Ultimate Spider-Man figure, and subsequently released a Symbiote-suit Spider-Man, Iron Spider, Zombie Spider-Man, a classic Spider-Man, a Spider-Man from The Amazing Spider-Man (with unmasked and metallic variants), an Amazing Spider-Man 2 figure (with an unmasked variant), a Spectacular Spider-Man, and a Spider-Man: Homecoming Spider-Man figure.
The Iron Spider armor also has a secret override that can be activated by Iron Man in case of emergencies or if Spider-Man ever switches sides (which he does in Civil War #5). However, unknown to Stark, Peter was already aware of the safety measure and had bypassed it with his own override, Password Surprise. Perhaps most sinister, Stark discovered a way to give his own Iron Man armor a "spider-sense" based on Peter's, and the ability to give Spider-Man's sense red herrings.
The dark Skull Man manga would later get a television adaptation and underwent drastic changes. The character was redesigned to resemble a grasshopper, becoming the renowned first masked hero of the Kamen Rider series. Kamen Rider is a motorcycle riding hero in an insect-like costume, who shouts Henshin (Transform) to don his costume and gain superhuman powers.
The thousands of Halloween postcards produced between the turn of the 20th century and the 1920s commonly show children but not trick-or-treating.[149] Trick-or-treating does not seem to have become a widespread practice until the 1930s, with the first U.S. appearances of the term in 1934,[150] and the first use in a national publication occurring in 1939.[151]
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