In issue #121 (June 1973),[49] the Green Goblin throws Gwen Stacy from a tower of either the Brooklyn Bridge (as depicted in the art) or the George Washington Bridge (as given in the text).[58][59] She dies during Spider-Man's rescue attempt; a note on the letters page of issue #125 states: "It saddens us to say that the whiplash effect she underwent when Spidey's webbing stopped her so suddenly was, in fact, what killed her."[60] The following issue, the Goblin appears to kill himself accidentally in the ensuing battle with Spider-Man.[61]
In Old Man Logan, Spider-Man was killed during or sometime after the event where the villains rose to power and the heroes fell. In this timeline, he is implied to have married an unknown African-American woman and had a daughter who eventually married Hawkeye and had a child of their own. Hawkeye won in a poker game and customized the Spider-Mobile after his death.[89]
During the Character Creation process, a "difficulty slider" allows the player to adjust their skin color, with white, Caucasian skin being 'easy' and dark black skin being 'very hard', though the Coon reminds the player, "this doesn't affect combat, just about every other aspect of your whole life." The slider was nonetheless picked up in many news outlets as genuine, with many subsequently expressing displeasure that its effects in the final game are relatively small.

Once you’ve found all your favorite Halloween goodies you can feel safe placing your order with us knowing that we use SSL and Threatmatrix for your security, and we’re even BBB accredited. Credit card? You got it! We accept all major credit cards. So, no matter if you need your Halloween costumes in a hurry or need them shipped internationally (we ship to more than 200 countries across the globe!), you’ll have lots of shipping options to choose from. Still have questions? Ask our next-level customer service team—they’re renowned Halloween Experts ready to make your Halloween the best EVER.

Claws And Infect · Crazy Legs · Fowl Fists · Head Hunter · Nugget Noggin · Talon Trotters ·  Battle Bird · Ghoul Gibbin' Gear · Hellhunter's Headpiece · Supernatural Stalker ·  Arsonist Apparatus · Creature's Grin · Lollichop Licker · Moccasin Machinery · Mr. Juice · Vampyro · Eyeborg · Forgotten King's Pauldrons · Forgotten King's Restless Head · Mannhattan Project ·  Bone-Cut Belt · Bull Locks · Immobile Suit · Minsk Beef · Beep Man · Garden Bristles · Iron Fist · Soul of 'Spensers Past · Tiny Texan · Herzensbrecher · Hundkopf · Kriegsmaschine-9000 · Templar's Spirit · Vampire Makeover · Vampiric Vesture · Wings of Purity ·  Cranial Conspiracy · Kanga Kickers · Marsupial Man · Marsupial Muzzle · Mr. Mundee's Wild Ride · Roo Rippers · Scaly Scrapers ·  Facepeeler · Nightmare Hunter · Rogue's Rabbit · Shadowman's Shade · Ghost of Spies Checked Past · Hooded Haunter · Li'l Dutchman
A similar system for augmenting your superhero abilities is 'DNA', allowing you to genetically augment yourself with the remains of fallen enemies. Of course, there always has to be balance i science, so strength comes at the cost of health and speed and vice versa. No, this system isn't the work of Dr. Alphonse Mephesto - it's actually Jimmy Valmer's latest side project.

Indira "Indy" Daimonji (appeared in Spider-Man: The New Animated Series): She is Peter Parker's potential love interest and a rival of Mary Jane Watson. She works at a news network down in Manhattan. She is seriously injured by Spider-Man in the series finale when Spider-Man is tricked by the Gaines Twins into injuring Indy. This led to Peter giving up being Spider-Man


To help with the rewrites, the production brought in Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, a playwright as well as well as a comic writer, having had a short run on Spectacular Spider-Man in 2006. After opening for a second time, the show once again received poor reviews, being called one of the worst Broadway shows of all time by New York Times critic Ben Brantley.
The Batsuit is the costume Batman wears to conceal his identity and to frighten criminals. Unable to create it by himself, Bruce Wayne needed Lucius Fox to provide him some sort of armor. Fox presented him a prototype armor suit that was rejected by the army due to cost. After receiving the suit, Bruce sprays it with black rubber and adds a bat symbol.

Combat and customization meet collectibles with Artifacts, powerful items you can find throughout town that enhance your character's "might" - their stats and abilities in combat, and sometimes those of your allies as well. Many of these artifacts, of course, are items relevant to South Park lore as well, like a sexy magazine from Mayor McDaniels' office. If you feel like you're stuck and can't progress, finding or equipping new artifacts might be a good move.
The Iron Spider armor also has a secret override that can be activated by Iron Man in case of emergencies or if Spider-Man ever switches sides (which he does in Civil War #5). However, unknown to Stark, Peter was already aware of the safety measure and had bypassed it with his own override, Password Surprise. Perhaps most sinister, Stark discovered a way to give his own Iron Man armor a "spider-sense" based on Peter's, and the ability to give Spider-Man's sense red herrings.
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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