i would say that that, in the comic book format, the first super-powered character would be popeye, who was capable of superhuman feats of strength by eathing spinach (1929). the same year also provided the comic book format with the first sort of vigilante-crime-fighter, the shadow. the full costumed crime fighter debuted in 1936 with the phantom. you can argue that the first time the medium of the comic book, the costume, and the super powers (not of magical origin - and i make that distinction because science, technology, mutation, etc. are devices that influence literature far more prominently post-industrial revolution, wheras magic and divinity were devices with long histories) were brought together was, indeed, the action comics superman debut issue.

As Jobs explains, object-oriented programming allows programmers to use code written by other coders without having to know all of the details of the code. This is a vital feature for writing large pieces of software and making software-based products like search engines, apps, social media site, and more. Object-oriented code essentially sets up an agreement between the program and the computer: “If you give me these inputs, I will give you this output.” This allows for easy modular and collaborative programming.
The toy's instructions are also somewhat crazy as they go through the entire transformation sequence, then end with a picture of Spider-Man transformed a totally different way from the waist down (resembling the picture on the back of the card). This was likely done because transforming him the correct way makes it impossible for him to stand without splaying his legs far out to the sides. The instructions also fail to note the step wherein his legs extend slightly to reveal double-jointed knees.
Spider-Man was featured in a trilogy of live-action films directed by Sam Raimi and starring Tobey Maguire as the titular superhero. The first Spider-Man film of the trilogy was released on May 3, 2002; followed by Spider-Man 2 (2004) and Spider-Man 3 (2007). A third sequel was originally scheduled to be released in 2011, however Sony later decided to reboot the franchise with a new director and cast. The reboot, titled The Amazing Spider-Man, was released on July 3, 2012; directed by Marc Webb and starring Andrew Garfield as the new Spider-Man.[189][190][191] It was followed by The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014).[192][193] In 2015, Sony and Disney made a deal for Spider-Man to appear in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.[194] Tom Holland made his debut as Spider-Man in the MCU film Captain America: Civil War (2016), before later starring in Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017); directed by Jon Watts.[195][196] Holland reprises his role as Spider-Man in Avengers: Infinity War (2018).[197][198]
A popular variant of trick-or-treating, known as trunk-or-treating (or Halloween tailgaiting), occurs when "children are offered treats from the trunks of cars parked in a church parking lot", or sometimes, a school parking lot.[113][152] In a trunk-or-treat event, the trunk (boot) of each automobile is decorated with a certain theme,[153] such as those of children's literature, movies, scripture, and job roles.[154] Trunk-or-treating has grown in popularity due to its perception as being more safe than going door to door, a point that resonates well with parents, as well as the fact that it "solves the rural conundrum in which homes [are] built a half-mile apart".[155][156]
By 1995, the suit was eventually modified, the cloak becoming a scalloped-edged cape and the gloves becoming gauntlets with three “fins” with claws embedded in the fingers for climbing. Famously drawn by the likes of Neal Adams and Jim Aparo, he eventually created a unique fire-retardant and chemical-resistant triple-weave Kevlar thread for the suit. The material had carbon nanotube fibers that imparted it with a unique sheen and made it heavily resistant to tearing. This material would go into the creation of all following bat-suits and other suits in the Bat Family. The most notable traits of this evolution were the incorporation of the yellow ellipse around the bat emblem as well as the capsule utility belt.
This distraction was all the Vulture needed to equip his suit and began attacking Spider-Man and the FBI. While Spider-Man saved the agents from the arms dealer's attacks, Vulture freed his men and urged them to escape. Another fierce fight ensued between the Vulture and Spider-Man, who used his Web-Shooters' combinations to enhance his fighting ability against the winged menace.
In the "House of M", a Marvel crossover, the Scarlet Witch alters reality to make mutants the ruling class over humans. This world is ruled by mutants and their leader, Magneto. In the mini-series Spider-Man: House of M, Peter Parker is believed to be a mutant, and Spider-Man's identity is widely known. He is rich, famous and married to Gwen Stacy, and they have a young son named Ritchie. Aunt May and Uncle Ben are alive and in good health, and J. Jonah Jameson is Peter's often-abused publicist. Unfortunately, his life unravels when Jameson reveals to the world that Spider-Man is not a born mutant. After the world is restored to normal, Peter suffers terribly with the memory of the life he left behind, expressing a desire to kill Magneto, whom he mistakenly believes was behind the events of House of M, and the Scarlet Witch, whose powers were responsible for the altered reality.[6] This version is later killed by Karn during the Spider-Verse event.[7]
When on a counter Earth, Peter Parker temporarily used his evil/good doppelganger's uniform. It was a look at the classic Spider-Man suit, red & blue, however with a modern twist. The Spider suit had web shooters built into the wrist bands/arms, and also featured a cape for mobility. This was used when Peter Parker's counterpart was badly wounded and needed Peter, Amazing Spider-Man, to fight crime in New York for a short time while Peter, the Amazing Spider, healed up. In the end, Peter Parker found out that his counterpart was actually draining the abilities of other Spider-Men and soon took the permanent role as the Amazing Spider.
Comics Week 33, 2017 2017 2017, October Modern-Age Spider-Men II Vol 1 T+ (13 and up) Axel Alonso/Editor-in-Chief Sara Pichelli/Cover Artist Justin Ponsor/Cover Artist Brian Michael Bendis/Writer Sara Pichelli/Penciler Sara Pichelli/Inker Elisabetta D'Amico/Inker Justin Ponsor/Colourist Cory Petit/Letterer Nick Lowe/Editor Allison Stock/Editor Kathleen Wisneski/Editor Devin Lewis/Editor Miles Morales (Earth-1610)/Quotes Miles Morales (Earth-1610)/Appearances Peter Parker (Earth-616)/Appearances Barbara Rodriguez (Earth-616)/Appearances Alias Investigations (Earth-616)/Appearances Jessica Jones (Earth-616)/Appearances Tony Masters (Earth-616)/Appearances Miles Morales (Earth-616)/Appearances Yahweh (Earth-616)/Invocations Victor von Doom (Earth-616)/Mentions New York City Police Department (Earth-616)/Appearances Stark Industries (Earth-616)/Mentions Strategic Homeland Intervention, Enforcement and Logistics Division (Earth-616)/Mentions Judge (Earth-1610)/Mentions Luke Cage (Earth-616)/Mentions Alison Blaire (Earth-616)/Appearances Hand (Earth-616)/Appearances Jessica Drew (Earth-616)/Appearances Jonathan Powers (Earth-616)/Appearances Frederick Dukes (Earth-616)/Appearances Lunella Lafayette (Earth-616)/Appearances Devil Dinosaur (Earth-78411)/Appearances Ophelia Sarkissian (Earth-616)/Appearances Quentin Beck (Earth-616)/Mentions Sasheer (Earth-616)/Appearances Homo sapiens/Appearances Watchers/Mentions Homo superior/Appearances Human-Inhuman Hybrids/Appearances Devil Beasts/Appearances Earth-616/Appearances Earth/Appearances United States of America/Appearances New York State/Appearances New York City/Appearances Manhattan/Appearances Alias Investigations Office/Appearances Lower East Side/Appearances Brooklyn/Appearances Brooklyn Visions Academy/Appearances Midtown High School/Mentions Michigan/Minor Appearances Detroit/Minor Appearances Spider-Man's Suit/Appearances Web-Shooters/Appearances Spider-Woman's Suit/Appearances Hulk Plug-In/Minor Appearances
In addition to the creation of new minority heroes, publishers have filled the identities and roles of once-Caucasian heroes with new characters from minority backgrounds. The African-American John Stewart appeared in the 1970s as an alternate for Earth's Green Lantern Hal Jordan, and would become a regular member of the Green Lantern Corps from the 1980s onward. The creators of the 2000s-era Justice League animated series selected Stewart as the show's Green Lantern. In the Ultimate Marvel universe, Miles Morales, a multiracial American youth who was also bitten by a genetically-altered spider, debuted as the new Spider-Man after the apparent death of the original. Kamala Khan, a Pakistani-American teenager who is revealed to have Inhuman lineage after her shapeshifting powers manifested, takes on the identity of Ms. Marvel in 2014. Her self-titled comic book series became a cultural phenomenon, with extensive media coverage by CNN, the New York Times and The Colbert Report, and embraced by anti-Islamophobia campaigners in San Francisco who plastered over anti-Muslim bus adverts with Kamala stickers.[57] Other such successor-heroes of color include James "Rhodey" Rhodes as Iron Man, Ryan Choi as the Atom, and Jaime Reyes as Blue Beetle.

In Forest Hills, Queens, New York,[44] Midtown High School student Peter Benjamin Parker is a science-whiz orphan living with his Uncle Ben and Aunt May. As depicted in Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962), he is bitten by a radioactive spider (erroneously classified as an insect in the panel) at a science exhibit and "acquires the agility and proportionate strength of an arachnid".[45] Along with heightened athletic abilities, Parker gains the ability to adhere to walls and ceilings. Through his native knack for science, he develops a gadget that lets him fire adhesive webbing of his own design through small, wrist-mounted barrels. Initially seeking to capitalize on his new abilities, Parker dons a costume and, as "Spider-Man", becomes a novelty television star. However, "He blithely ignores the chance to stop a fleeing thief, [and] his indifference ironically catches up with him when the same criminal later robs and kills his Uncle Ben." Spider-Man tracks and subdues the killer and learns, in the story's next-to-last caption, "With great power there must also come—great responsibility!"[46]


In “The Coddling of the American Mind,” Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt argued that too many college students engage in “catastrophizing,” which is to say, turning common events into nightmarish trials or claiming that easily bearable events are too awful to bear. After citing examples, they concluded, “smart people do, in fact, overreact to innocuous speech, make mountains out of molehills, and seek punishment for anyone whose words make anyone else feel uncomfortable.”
Halloween or Hallowe'en (a contraction of All Hallows' Evening),[5] also known as Allhalloween,[6] All Hallows' Eve,[7] or All Saints' Eve,[8] is a celebration observed in a number of countries on 31 October, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows' Day. It begins the three-day observance of Allhallowtide,[9] the time in the liturgical year dedicated to remembering the dead, including saints (hallows), martyrs, and all the faithful departed.[10][11]
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