Bzz! Bzz! Bzz! That's that sound of justice when served by Mosquito. When the insect-human hybrid Mosquito enters the fray, enemies are quickly drained of their will to fight… and blood. Bitten by a radioactive mosquito, Clyde Donovan became the superhuman disease vector known as: Mosquito. Now he sucks the blood out of crime and is generally really gross.
On the evening of 11 May 1984, in Jackson Township, New Jersey, the Haunted Castle (Six Flags Great Adventure) caught fire. As a result of the fire, eight teenagers perished.[184] The backlash to the tragedy was a tightening of regulations relating to safety, building codes and the frequency of inspections of attractions nationwide. The smaller venues, especially the nonprofit attractions, were unable to compete financially, and the better funded commercial enterprises filled the vacuum.[185][186] Facilities that were once able to avoid regulation because they were considered to be temporary installations now had to adhere to the stricter codes required of permanent attractions.[187][188][189]
^ Besides being most notable as a Spider-Man supervillain. He has also been depicted as a Fantastic Four antagonist in Stan Lee and Jack Kirby comics books (mostly due to being introduced as the original Frightful Four[142]) along with being on the heroic side (being a Avengers member[143]) until being introduced as a tragic supervillain in the Spider-Man comics once again.[144]

It is widely believed that many Halloween traditions originated from ancient Celtic harvest festivals, particularly the Gaelic festival Samhain; that such festivals may have had pagan roots; and that Samhain itself was Christianized as Halloween by the early Church.[12][13][14][15][16] Some believe, however, that Halloween began solely as a Christian holiday, separate from ancient festivals like Samhain.[17][18][19][20]
The word Halloween or Hallowe'en dates to about 1745[31] and is of Christian origin.[32] The word "Hallowe'en" means "hallowed evening" or "holy evening".[33] It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows' Eve (the evening before All Hallows' Day).[34] In Scots, the word "eve" is even, and this is contracted to e'en or een. Over time, (All) Hallow(s) E(v)en evolved into Hallowe'en. Although the phrase "All Hallows'" is found in Old English "All Hallows' Eve" is itself not seen until 1556.[34][35]
Jump up ^ Merriam-Webster's Encyclopædia of World Religions. Merriam-Webster. 1999. Archived from the original on 18 June 2013. Retrieved 31 October 2011. Halloween, also called All Hallows' Eve, holy or hallowed evening observed on October 31, the eve of All Saints' Day. The Irish pre-Christian observances influenced the Christian festival of All Hallows' Eve, celebrated on the same date.

On top of his spider-given powers Peter is of genius level intelligence. It has even been stated that Peter scored as high on some of the same testing scores as Reed Richards did when he was Peter's age. He is especially gifted in the sciences such as mechanics, biology and physics. This has become particularly apparent during his time working at Horizon Labs, where he was able to create a device to drain Alpha of his powers in less than 24 hours.


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Jump up ^ Woods, Robert (2013). Evangelical Christians and Popular Culture. ABC-CLIO. p. 239. ISBN 9780313386541. Evangelicals have found opportunities with both Christmas and Easter to use Christian candy to re-inject religion into these traditionally Christian holidays and boldly reclaim them as their own. They have increasingly begun to use Halloween, the most candy-centric holiday, as an opportunity for evangelism. Contained in small packages featuring Bible verses, Scripture Candy's "Harvest Seeds"--candy corn in everything but name—are among many candies created for this purpose.

True playboys know that sex appeal goes way beyond physical appearance, and well, sometimes having a big bankroll and a mansion can help too! We can't get you started on the path towards being rich and famous, but we can give you the costume to let you be the ultimate philanderer—Hugh Hefner! This smoking jacket will turn you into the famed founder of Playboy magazine and the original lone resident of the Playboy mansion.
The earliest superhero I could find reference to was Mandrake the Magician, who debuted in 1934, four years before Superman, who was probably the first popular superhero. Mandrake’s super power was his ability to “make people believe anything, simply by gesturing hypnotically”. Does anyone out there know of any superheroes who made an earlier media appearance?

Spider-Man has many abilities but the most amazing of all is his uncanny Spider-Sense. It is a tingling sensation on the back of his skull that acts as a "sixth sense" and it manifests when he is around or targeted by incoming dangers. It's a precognition ability that is pheromone based and is similar to Daredevil's radar sense, increasing his reaction time and awareness. The spider-sense can manifest when Peter's secret identity is about to be compromised. It also manifests when he encounters someone who might pose a threat to him or to someone he cares about. For example, when Peter saw his roommate Michele Gonzales with one of her clients, his spider-sense warned him that the client was actually a thug who was participating in a super-villain gladiatorial contest. While the spider-sense cannot discern the specific nature of the impending threat, he can identify which direction it is coming from and the severity of the danger by the intensity of the spider-sense. Sometimes it becomes strong enough to be painful. When Spider-Man is blinded, the Spider-Sense works as another set of eyes to avoid bumping into objects. When Daken used his pheromones on Spider-Man, Peter closed his eyes and relied only on his spider-sense to defeat his foe because the pheromones corrupted his sight. A similar situation happened when Peter fought the new Vulture who blinded him with acid in the eyes. Spider-Man relied on this ability to survive this fight. Of course his Spider-Sense is a great help when he faces people in the dark. This has been proven in his fight with Iron Fist. The spider-sense can lose its effectiveness when Peter is too distracted, tired or when he chooses to ignore it although its difficult to do so because it is heavily linked to his reflexes. There were also times that his spider-sense wasn't very effective due to the Spidey's previous lack of formal training, but this has since has been largely rectified since learning the Way of the Spider. Under extreme circumstances, such as fighting in the dark or against powerful characters, Spidey has often used his spectacular spider-sense in a more effective and better way. The Spider-Sense also gave him his own free-style form of combat, allowing him to go head-to-head with the best martial artists in the Marvel Universe and his H2H skill has improved significantly since merging his Way of the Spider training with his Spider-Sense. Furthermore, the Spider-Sense also allows Spider-Man to detect certain radio frequencies on which his spider tracers' signals are based upon. During Spider-Man's first encounter with the Chameleon, the villain used a certain radio frequency to send a message to Spider-Man via his spider-sense. The Spider-Sense, combined with his speed and reflexes allows Spider-Man to dodge almost all conventional attacks. Due to the similar nature of their powers, Spider-Man is unable to sense other "Spiders", such as Ben Reilly, Ezekiel, and Kaine. During the Big Time story, Spider-Man used a device to block Alistair Smythe's minions' enhanced senses, but also disabled his own Spider-Sense. After the events of Spider-Island, Peter regained this ability.
After Bruce Wayne was defeated and crippled by Bane, he nominated Jean-Paul Valley to take up the mantle of Batman while he recovered. While initially wearing Bruce Wayne’s uniform, Jean-Paul would eventually begin to succumb to his “programming," becoming more and more corrupted by the crime he was fighting, and replaced the suit with his own tailor-made armour with razor disks, blades and hidden weapons, becoming a more aggressive and unstable Batman, known among comic-fans as the “Azbat” ("Azrael-Batman").
Upon approaching the Spider-Island arc, Peter felt vulnerable with the lack of his spider sense. He began training under Shang Chi to create his own unique martial arts style to make up for his lack of spider sense called the "Way of the Spider". It was then revealed that Shang Chi was instructed by the new Madam Web (Julia Carpenter the former Arachne and Spider-Woman) to secretly prepare Peter for a future threat (Spider-Island). This style consists of among other things, hitting pressure points with Spider Strength, and striking with Spider Speed. This new martial art has considerably improved Spider-Man's H2H capabilities, and so far he has stalemated Julia Carpenter and effortlessly defeated 3 spider-powered individuals in a few seconds during Spider-Island. When he regained his Spider-Sense, he defeated a mutated Kaine who was considerably stronger and quicker than him, and effortlessly trumped a mind controlled Spider-Woman, in handful of blows and kicks.
There’s a related question that has some bearing on the answer to the above question: what is a superhero? There have probably been books (or at least extensive Usenet threads) written on this topic, but a good baseline definition needs to acknowledge both the “super” and the “hero” parts. That is, the person needs to have some superhuman power or powers and has to fight the bad guys. But this basic definition is flawed. Superman is an alien, not human. Batman doesn’t have any super powers…he’s a self-made superhero like Syndrome in The Incredibles. Or can a superhero be anyone (human or no) that fights bad guys and is superior to normal heroes…the cream of the hero crop? And what about a costume or alter ego…are they essential for superheroism? These are all questions well-suited for asking the internet, so have at it: what’s a good definition for a superhero?
In Marvel Zombies Return Spider-Man is teleported to a new world, where he consumes and infects the Sinister Six (except for Sandman). As his cosmic abilities did not come with him, and his webshooters have dried up, the zombified superhero is forced to make do with his own veins and arteries. Following the death of the Spider-Man of this universe (killed by Sandman in revenge for the deaths of the Sinister Six)[16] the zombie Spider-Man works on developing a cure for the plague with the aid of the Kitty Pryde of this universe, using nanites and the blood of this world's Wolverine.[17] With the zombie Giant-Man having followed Spider-Man to this new reality, Spider-Man resolves to stop Giant-Man.[18] Spider-Man releases the Sandman, now infused with nanites, and wipes out every zombie hero and villain. Zombie Spider-Man dies from being exposed to his own weapon.[volume & issue needed]
Issue #500 of The Amazing Spider-Man shows what would happen if Spider-Man were to have proceeded in killing Kraven by Julia Carpenter, now possessing Madam Web's powers. In the vision of the second Madame Web that takes place on 312500, Peter appears with long hair and was kicked out of the Avengers for his killing of the Kravinoffs. He then develops a much colder and harsher personality and proceeds with attacking Harry Osborn. He then appears in a new red leather costume and starts killing all of the supervillains, with Doctor Octopus, and reveals his identity to his Aunt May, who is shocked and in tears.[40]
Robert Downey, Jr., Josh Brolin, Mark Ruffalo, Tom Hiddleston, Chris Hemsworth, Chris Evans, Chris Pratt, Elizabeth Olsen, Zoe Saldana, Karen Gillan, Sebastian Stan, Benedict Cumberbatch, Benedict Wong, Tom Holland, Paul Bettany, Vin Diesel, Terry Notary, Dave Bautista, Bradley Cooper, Sean Gunn, Pom Klementieff, Benicio del Toro, Anthony Mackie, Scarlett Johansson, Chadwick Boseman, Danai Gurira, Don Cheadle, Tom Vaughan-Lawlor, Letitia Wright, Winston Duke, Cobie Smulders, Gwyneth Paltrow , Ethan Dizon, Tiffany Espensen, Jacob Batalon, Isabella Amara, Florence Kasumba, Terry Notary, Carrie Coon, Michael James Shaw, Peter Dinklage, Idris Elba, William Hurt, Samuel L. Jackson, Kerry Condon, Ross Marquand, Stan Lee, Stephen McFeely

The custom of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[25] In 19th century America, Halloween was often celebrated with costume parades and "licentious revelries".[26] However, efforts were made to "domesticate" the festival to conform with Victorian era morality. Halloween was made into a private rather than public holiday, celebrations involving liquor and sensuality de-emphasized, and only children were expected to celebrate the festival.[27] Early Halloween costumes emphasized the gothic nature of Halloween, and were aimed primarily at children. Costumes were also made at home, or using items (such as make-up) which could be purchased and utilized to create a costume. But in the 1930s, A.S. Fishbach, Ben Cooper, Inc., and other firms began mass-producing Halloween costumes for sale in stores as trick-or-treating became popular in North America. Halloween costumes are often designed to imitate supernatural and scary beings. Costumes are traditionally those of monsters such as vampires, werewolves, zombies, ghosts,[28] skeletons, witches, goblins, trolls, devils, etc. or in more recent years such science fiction-inspired characters as aliens and superheroes. There are also costumes of pop culture figures like presidents, athletes, celebrities, or characters in film, television, literature, etc. Another popular trend is for women (and in some cases, men) to use Halloween as an excuse to wear sexy or revealing costumes, showing off more skin than would be socially acceptable otherwise.[29] Young girls also often dress as entirely non-scary characters at Halloween, including princesses, fairies, angels, cute animals and flowers.
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