Español: hacer un disfraz de superhéroe, Italiano: Realizzare un Costume da Supereroe, Português: Fazer uma Fantasia de Super Herói, Français: créer un costume de super héros, 中文: 制作一套超级英雄服, Русский: сделать костюм супергероя, Deutsch: Ein Superheldenkostüm basteln, Bahasa Indonesia: Membuat Kostum Superhero, Nederlands: Een superheldenkostuum maken
Peter Benjamin Parker was born to C.I.A. agents Richard and Mary Parker, who were killed when Peter was very young. After the death of his parents, Peter was raised by his Uncle Ben and Aunt May in a modest house in Forest Hills, New York. While still in High School, Peter attended a science exhibition about radiology where he was bitten by a radioactive spider, granting him the proportionate strength and agility of a spider as well as a " Spider-Sense" that warns him of nearby danger. In order to test his new abilities – and earn some cash, Peter participated in a wrestling challenge against Crusher Hogan. He easily won the challenge and also gained the attention of the media. Afterwards while backstage, Peter saw a burglar run past him but did nothing to stop him as it wasn’t his problem. Later that night when Peter arrived home, he was told by a policeman that his Uncle Ben had been murdered by someone who broke into their house. The cop mentioned they had tracked the killer to a warehouse. In his anger Peter put on his wrestling costume and went after the murderer himself. After arriving at the warehouse and easily defeating Uncle Ben’s killer, Peter saw that it was the same burglar he didn’t stop at the arena… thus learning that "with great power comes great responsibility".
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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