I really liked the idea of Popeye as the first sequential art precedent! But the general Modernist and American concept of a superhero also has deep roots in the radio legacy of The Shadow and others. I don’t know enough about early european newsprint comics to hazard a guess; I wouldn’t be surprised to hear of one. Other western antecenants not mentioned in detail, King Arthur (most certainly magical, and indirectly religious being THE socialized mythic antecend to the Divine Right of Kings) Robin Hood, certainly Populist, but no superpowers…falls into the category of abnornally super abilities a la Batman, and if Batman isn’t included on this list, well….
^ Jump up to: a b c d Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 72. ISBN 978-0756692360. Writer Gerry Conway and artist Ross Andru introduced two major new characters to Spider-Man's world and the Marvel Universe in this self-contained issue. Not only would the vigilante known as the Punisher go on to be one of the most important and iconic Marvel creations of the 1970s, but his instigator, the Jackal, would become the next big threat in Spider-Man's life.
^ Jump up to: a b c DeFalco "1960s" in Gilbert (2008), p. 93: "Dr. Octopus shared many traits with Peter Parker. They were both shy, both interested in science, and both had trouble relating to women...Otto Octavius even looked like a grown up Peter Parker. Lee and Ditko intended Otto to be the man Peter might have become if he hadn't been raised with a sense of responsibility.
“Springing unheralded out of working-class Jewish immigrant neighborhoods in the depths of the Depression, these young men transformed an odd mix of geekdom, science fiction, and outsider yearnings into blue-eyed, chisel-nosed crime-fighters and adventurers who quickly captured the mainstream imagination. Within a few years their inventions were being read by 90% of American children and had spawned a new genre in movies, radio and TV that still dominates youth entertainment seventy years later.”
Since the North American history is relatively short, in searching for the superhero, maybe you should take a look into European or Asian history. I’m pretty sure there were stories about the super-capable guys fighting for the justice long before the 1934. These stories were probably told by the word of mouth, more likely then written down or sketched.
Jump up ^ Portaro, Sam (25 January 1998). A Companion to the Lesser Feasts and Fasts. Cowley Publications. p. 199. ISBN 1461660513. All Saints' Day is the centerpiece of an autumn triduum. In the carnival celebrations of All Hallows' Eve our ancestors used the most powerful weapon in the human arsenal, the power of humor and ridicule to confront the power of death. The following day, in the commemoration of All Saints, we gave witness to the victory of incarnate goodness embodied in remarkable deeds and doers triumphing over the misanthropy of darkness and devils. And in the commemoration of All Souls we proclaimed the hope of common mortality expressed in our aspirations and expectations of a shared eternity.
Spider-Man has appeared in comics, cartoons, films, video games, coloring books, novels, records, and children's books.[159] On television, he first starred in the ABC animated series Spider-Man (1967–1970);[185] Spidey Super Stories (1974-1977) on PBS; and the CBS live action series The Amazing Spider-Man (1978–1979), starring Nicholas Hammond. Other animated series featuring the superhero include the syndicated Spider-Man (1981–1982), Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends (1981–1983), Fox Kids' Spider-Man (1994–1998), Spider-Man Unlimited (1999–2000), Spider-Man: The New Animated Series (2003), The Spectacular Spider-Man (2008–2009), and Ultimate Spider-Man (2012–2017).[186]
What sets the superhero apart from the “everyday” hero such as the fireman who’s job is to do things that might be seen is perfectly heroic, is that the Superhero generally is symbolic. The superhero does what nobody else is doing, in a way that most people can’t, at least not readily. Batman has, in some incarnations, rationalized that he does what he does because nobody else can. Notice if you will, that most if not all superheroes are beyond (but not neccessarily above) what regular people think of as the law. Superman regularly does things that would, if you think about it, break scores of laws. And the activities of Batman - or Robin Hood - go without saying. Part of what makes the superhero super, perhaps, is his ability to perform these duties and not abuse the fact that he must operate outside the normal bounds of citizens.
In the "House of M", a Marvel crossover, the Scarlet Witch alters reality to make mutants the ruling class over humans. This world is ruled by mutants and their leader, Magneto. In the mini-series Spider-Man: House of M, Peter Parker is believed to be a mutant, and Spider-Man's identity is widely known. He is rich, famous and married to Gwen Stacy, and they have a young son named Ritchie. Aunt May and Uncle Ben are alive and in good health, and J. Jonah Jameson is Peter's often-abused publicist. Unfortunately, his life unravels when Jameson reveals to the world that Spider-Man is not a born mutant. After the world is restored to normal, Peter suffers terribly with the memory of the life he left behind, expressing a desire to kill Magneto, whom he mistakenly believes was behind the events of House of M, and the Scarlet Witch, whose powers were responsible for the altered reality.[6] This version is later killed by Karn during the Spider-Verse event.[7]
It seemed that Spider-man was finally back on track, with his name cleared and his life finally looking a bit better than it had in recent months. Norman Osborn however kept being a disturbing presence to Peter and Mary Jane. He started a ritual known as the Gathering of the Five, with one person getting Ultimate power, one got death, one got insanity and so on. Norman thought he gained power, but it turned out that it was insanity that he got. He attacked and kidnapped Peter. While he was captive, Peter got the shock of a life-time. His aunt May was standing in front of him, alive and well. After Spider-man broke free and defeated Norman Osborn, seemingly for good, as he was taken to a mental hospital, Peter learned that it was in fact aunt May he found. Not a clone, not a hoax. Norman had apparently kidnapped May years ago, and had an actress surgically look like aunt May and play her part while she was dying. This was why 'aunt May' knew about Peter being Spider-Man, she was hired by Norman Osborn to play her! Reed Richards of the Fantastic Four assured Peter it was his aunt. Peter saw this as a sign and stopped being Spider-Man altogether, finally living a good life with his aunt May and his wife Mary-Jane.
Captain Universe's history in the Earth X series was relatively the same as it had been on Earth-616 up until the Infinity Gauntlet Saga, where an unknown Captain Universe fought alongside Kismet, the Silver Surfer, Comet Man, Carol Danvers, Nova and Star-Lord. Years later Arcturus Rann died in a battle against the Psycho Man and took the Enigma Force with him to the afterlife. Captain Universe was transferred into the Kree superhero Mar-Vell and eventually became part of a completed Cosmic Conscience which revived the Perfect Knowledge of the Perfect Universe which had been destroyed countless millennia ago by The Celestials. Captain Universe later joined with Reed Richards to form the new Eternity. They were last seen preparing to save Franklin from The Celestials and The Elders of the Universe.
The custom of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[25] In 19th century America, Halloween was often celebrated with costume parades and "licentious revelries".[26] However, efforts were made to "domesticate" the festival to conform with Victorian era morality. Halloween was made into a private rather than public holiday, celebrations involving liquor and sensuality de-emphasized, and only children were expected to celebrate the festival.[27] Early Halloween costumes emphasized the gothic nature of Halloween, and were aimed primarily at children. Costumes were also made at home, or using items (such as make-up) which could be purchased and utilized to create a costume. But in the 1930s, A.S. Fishbach, Ben Cooper, Inc., and other firms began mass-producing Halloween costumes for sale in stores as trick-or-treating became popular in North America. Halloween costumes are often designed to imitate supernatural and scary beings. Costumes are traditionally those of monsters such as vampires, werewolves, zombies, ghosts,[28] skeletons, witches, goblins, trolls, devils, etc. or in more recent years such science fiction-inspired characters as aliens and superheroes. There are also costumes of pop culture figures like presidents, athletes, celebrities, or characters in film, television, literature, etc. Another popular trend is for women (and in some cases, men) to use Halloween as an excuse to wear sexy or revealing costumes, showing off more skin than would be socially acceptable otherwise.[29] Young girls also often dress as entirely non-scary characters at Halloween, including princesses, fairies, angels, cute animals and flowers.
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