Ultimate Spider-Man is a modernized reboot of the Spider-Man story, starting from the very beginning, with a plot that is inspired by, but very different from, the original continuity, and thus is a parallel universe counterpart to the mainstream version of Spider-Man. The main purpose of the series is to be accessible to new and young readers, as it is free from the decades of history of the original, but it has been embraced by many longtime fans as well.

We found out in a hurry after the hit films, Iron Man and Captain America: The First Avenger, that our brand new cinematic heroes were going to need a little help saving the world. That’s why fans were prepared when The Avengers took the world by storm! With a bevy of films under the Marvel Cinematic Universe, this group has become a fan favorite for those watching and wanting to pay homage to them by going in costume. When you can find a friend to go in a Hulk costume or Thor costume we think you’re going to find that your group has the chops to get the job done. And if you have a femme fatale to be the Black Widow? Well, then you’re going to be downright unstoppable in your Marvel costumes!
^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 24. ISBN 978-0756692360. Electro charged into Spider-Man's life for the first time in another [Stan] Lee and [Steve] Ditko effort that saw Peter Parker using his brilliant mind to outwit a foe.
Within the Marvel Universe there exists a multiverse with many variations of Spider-Men.[149] An early character included in the 1980's is the fictional anthropomorphic funny animal parody of Spider-Man in pig form named Spider-Ham (Peter Porker).[150] Many imprints of Spider-Men were created like the futuristic version of Spider-Man in Marvel 2099 named Miguel O'Hara. In Marvel Comics 2 imprint, Peter marries Mary Jane and has a daughter named Mayday Parker who carries on Spider-Man's legacy and Marvel Noir has a 1930's version of Peter Parker.[151] [149] [152] Other themed versions exist within the early 2000's such as an Marvel Mangaverse version and an Indian version from Spider-Man: India named Pavitr Prabhakar.[153] [149]

In 1962, with the success of the Fantastic Four, Marvel Comics editor and head writer Stan Lee was casting about for a new superhero idea. He said the idea for Spider-Man arose from a surge in teenage demand for comic books, and the desire to create a character with whom teens could identify.[16]:1 In his autobiography, Lee cites the non-superhuman pulp magazine crime fighter the Spider as a great influence,[15]:130 and in a multitude of print and video interviews, Lee stated he was further inspired by seeing a spider climb up a wall—adding in his autobiography that he has told that story so often he has become unsure of whether or not this is true.[note 1] Although at the time teenage superheroes were usually given names ending with "boy", Lee says he chose "Spider-Man" because he wanted the character to age as the series progressed, and moreover felt the name "Spider-Boy" would have made the character sound inferior to other superheroes.[17] At that time Lee had to get only the consent of Marvel publisher Martin Goodman for the character's approval. In a 1986 interview, Lee described in detail his arguments to overcome Goodman's objections.[note 2] Goodman eventually agreed to a Spider-Man tryout in what Lee in numerous interviews recalled as what would be the final issue of the science-fiction and supernatural anthology series Amazing Adult Fantasy, which was renamed Amazing Fantasy for that single issue, #15 (cover-dated August 1962, on sale June 5, 1962).[18] In particular, Lee stated that the fact that it had already been decided that Amazing Fantasy would be cancelled after issue #15 was the only reason Goodman allowed him to use Spider-Man.[17] While this was indeed the final issue, its editorial page anticipated the comic continuing and that "The Spiderman [sic] ... will appear every month in Amazing."[18][19]
It is Spider-Man's original and main look that has defined Spider-Man since his first appearance. Although it has seen many variations, it has remained one of Spider-Man's essential traits. During Spidey's early appearances, the costume was black & red with blue shadings. In later issues, the colors change and they become red & blue with black shading but some artists use the black color to give the character more depth. Also, Spider-Man was portrayed having webbing underneath his armpits that extended from his wrist to his waist. Over time, the under-arm webbing has shrank and some artists decided to draw Spidey without the webbing although it still appeared in some modern appearances.
Trick-or-treating is a customary celebration for children on Halloween. Children go in costume from house to house, asking for treats such as candy or sometimes money, with the question, "Trick or treat?" The word "trick" implies a "threat" to perform mischief on the homeowners or their property if no treat is given.[84] The practice is said to have roots in the medieval practice of mumming, which is closely related to souling.[135] John Pymm writes that "many of the feast days associated with the presentation of mumming plays were celebrated by the Christian Church."[136] These feast days included All Hallows' Eve, Christmas, Twelfth Night and Shrove Tuesday.[137][138] Mumming practiced in Germany, Scandinavia and other parts of Europe,[139] involved masked persons in fancy dress who "paraded the streets and entered houses to dance or play dice in silence".[140]
On "In Darkness Dwells," it is shown that there's an infrared scope built within the cowl, along with a rebreather that can be folded within it. There's a wireless relay communicator in the cowl. Its signals are locked with quantum cryptology and bounced through a dozen different satellites (presumably the WayneComs). As per the animation styles, the suit varies between versions of the Batman Begins standard black suit and the Comic Book original.
The cape and cowl of the suits are prominently displayed as Bruce Wayne's spiritual presence in proceedings after the Final Crisis. With the cape and cowl of the clone being displayed alongside the other batsuits as a memorial that Richard Grayson would constantly return to and ultimately forge his own decision to become the new Batman, while the cape and cowl of Bruce misplaced in time would become a holy relic of the Miagani Tribe from the prehistoric era onwards, enshrined in the caverns that would eventually become the Batcave.

[32] Researchers conducted a survey for the National Retail Federation in the United States and found that 53.3 percent of consumers planned to buy a costume for Halloween 2005, spending $38.11 on average (up $10 from the year before). They were also expected to spend $4.96 billion in 2006, up significantly from just $3.3 billion the previous year.[33] The troubled economy has caused many Americans to cut back on Halloween spending. In 2009, the National Retail Federation anticipated that American households would decrease Halloween spending by as much as 15% to $56.31.[34] In 2013, Americans spent an estimated $6.9 billion to celebrate Halloween, including a predicted $2.6 billion on costumes (with more spent on adult costumes than for children's costumes) and $330 million on pet costumes.[35][36] In 2017 it was estimated that Americans would spend $9.1 billion on Halloween merchandise with $3.4 billion of that being on spend on Halloween costumes.[37]
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