Both Spider-Men face off against Mysterio's Avatar. Miles blindly attacks, but due to his lack of combat experience and tactics, he is easily thrown back into Peter and both end up in the East River. Mysterio then deploys high-technology and a strong chemical in order to create the illusion that a mob of Spider-Man's enemies from both realities is attacking them. During the battle, Peter figures out the trick and demands Mysterio to return him to his home universe. Angered, Mysterio decides to instead strand Peter in a world where he is believed to be dead. The avatar self-destructs rendering Miles unconscious. He later wakes up to see that the Ultimates and Nick Fury are on the scene. While his version of Tony Stark begins to work on deciphering Mysterio's dimension technology, Miles asks where Peter went. Fury surmised that he went off to find out the truth about his alternate self. Peter decides to investigate on his own and goes to the location where his apartment in his home universe is supposed to be. He finds it to be converted into a store, and while posing some questions to the cashier, he stops an armed gunman who was attempting a robbery. He is shocked to find out that the Peter Parker of this other world had died in battle and that the city was still mourning his tragic end. It is also common knowledge that Peter Parker was Spider-Man. Distraught over the news, he swings over to Queens where the Parker Residence is currently up for sale. May Parker is seeing off Gwen Stacy to school. When they both see Peter in his costume, they believe he is some lunatic who is disrespecting the memory of the deceased Peter Parker and threaten to call the police. They become shocked beyond words as Peter unmasks himself with tears in his eyes.[5]
who lives a life as Peter and Spider-Man. They also used the same characters as before, such as: Peter's Aunt May, J. Jonah Jameson: Editor of the Daily Bugle, Betty Brant: Jameson's secretary and classic damsel in distress, and later on during the series, Robbie Robertson, Jameson's assistant. Spidey also faces some of his usual foes such as: Green Goblin, Doctor Octopus, Mysterio and the Chameleon. This also included a six part story arc where Spidey goes up against Doctor Doom throughout the series. Spidey was voiced by Ted Schwartz in this series.
The word Halloween or Hallowe'en dates to about 1745[31] and is of Christian origin.[32] The word "Hallowe'en" means "hallowed evening" or "holy evening".[33] It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows' Eve (the evening before All Hallows' Day).[34] In Scots, the word "eve" is even, and this is contracted to e'en or een. Over time, (All) Hallow(s) E(v)en evolved into Hallowe'en. Although the phrase "All Hallows'" is found in Old English "All Hallows' Eve" is itself not seen until 1556.[34][35]
During her career, she had a role in the rebirth of two of Spider-Man's old foes during the Rose's efforts to gain extra muscle: she was the one who threw the switch of the electric chair which gave Electro his powers back, and helped set up the theft of Doctor Octopus' corpse for re-animation from the Hand. She also appears in Loners as an assassin smuggling MGH.[113][114][115][116]
It was during the 1930s, about the same time as trick-or-treating, that Halloween-themed haunted houses first began to appear in America. It was in the late 1950s that haunted houses as a major attraction began to appear, focusing first on California. Sponsored by the Children's Health Home Junior Auxiliary, the San Mateo Haunted House opened in 1957. The San Bernardino Assistance League Haunted House opened in 1958. Home haunts began appearing across the country during 1962 and 1963. In 1964, the San Manteo Haunted House opened, as well as the Children's Museum Haunted House in Indianapolis.[178]

Jump up ^ Lipton, Eric (April 9, 2008). "Official Had Controversial Photos Deleted, Report Says". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-04-09."The staff member who won the “most original costume” prize wore a dreadlock wig, what looked like a prison jumpsuit and black face paint. “I’m a Jamaican detainee from Krome — obviously, I’ve escaped,” the employee, referring to a detention center in Miami, announced to the judges..."

The ideas of second-wave feminism, which spread through the 1960s into the 1970s, greatly influenced the way comic book companies would depict as well as market their female characters: Wonder Woman was for a time revamped as a mod-dressing martial artist directly inspired by the Emma Peel character from the British television series The Avengers (no relation to the superhero team of the same name),[29] but later reverted to Marston's original concept after the editors of Ms. magazine publicly disapproved of the character being depowered and without her traditional costume;[30] Supergirl was moved from being a secondary feature on Action Comics to headline Adventure Comics in 1969; the Lady Liberators appeared in an issue of The Avengers as a group of mind-controlled superheroines led by Valkyrie (actually a disguised supervillainess) and were meant to be a caricatured parody of feminist activists;[31] and Jean Grey became the embodiment of a cosmic being known as the Phoenix Force with seemingly unlimited power in the late 1970s, a stark contrast from her depiction as the weakest member of her team a decade ago.
I really liked the idea of Popeye as the first sequential art precedent! But the general Modernist and American concept of a superhero also has deep roots in the radio legacy of The Shadow and others. I don’t know enough about early european newsprint comics to hazard a guess; I wouldn’t be surprised to hear of one. Other western antecenants not mentioned in detail, King Arthur (most certainly magical, and indirectly religious being THE socialized mythic antecend to the Divine Right of Kings) Robin Hood, certainly Populist, but no superpowers…falls into the category of abnornally super abilities a la Batman, and if Batman isn’t included on this list, well….
Gabriel : Gwen's son by Norman Osborn. Norman convinced Gabriel and his sister, Sarah, that Peter Parker was their father and had killed their mother. Although Sarah is persuaded otherwise, Gabriel continues to believe so and takes on the identity of the "Gray" Goblin. After a confrontation with Spider-Man, he crashed into the river on his glider and lost his memories. Sarah took him to their home in France to recover. After failing to convince Sarah to join him, he flies off on a different glider. Introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man #509.
He first appeared as a Peter Parker double emerging from one of the Jackal's pods that initially an amnesiac but later believed himself to be the real Peter Parker, having been kept in stasis since the first Clone Saga. He claimed that both Peter Parker and Ben Reilly were his clones. However, upon meeting Parker, Reilly and Kaine, the Jackal's programming kicked in and he went insane before shapeshifting into a freakish giant, therefore revealing his true status as a clone. In denial of the truth, he tried to kill the "clones" and to claim Peter Parker's life as his own. He was even infatuated with Parker's wife Mary Jane Watson and seeks to have her as his bride. Since their first encounter, Reilly realizes that Spidercide is twisted from the start and expresses disgust of his corrupted doppelgänger's immorality, tauntingly refers him as "Freakface" once the villainous clone's shapeshifting powers manifest. However, this also causes Reilly to be afraid of his and Parker's capabilities for wicked if they allow themselves demoralize as Spidercide.
^ Another character commonly described as an archenemy is Venom. Eddie Brock as Venom is commonly described as the mirror version or the evil version of Spider-Man in many ways.[90][132][140] Venom's goals is usually depicted as trying to ruin Spider-Man's life and mess with Spider-Man's head when it comes to targeting enemies.[135] Venom is cited as being one of the most popular Spider-Man villains.[147] This popularity has led him to be an established iconic character of his own with own comic book stories.[132][148]
The Uni-Power is an extra-dimensional force that possesses an individual (or on one occasion, twins) in a time of crisis, transforming that person into Captain Universe. As Captain Universe, the transformed person typically retains his or her original personality and appearance, though with Captain Universe's costume and heroic traits superimposed over the original. The Uni-Power itself emanates from the Enigma Force, the exact nature of which, naturally, remains an enigma. It is believed, however, to be connected to the Microverse, home of the Micronauts. Although the Uni-Power typically empowers normal, non-super-powered humans, it has in the past empowered Doctor Strange, Spider-Man, Commander Arcturus Rann of the Micronauts, a toddler, and a dog, among others. Its counterparts in various alternate timelines have also possessed Mar-Vell, Mr. Fantastic, a member of the alien Badoon race, a Doombot and Quasar. Because of its never-ending supply of energy it has been the target of many individuals, terrorist groups and peacekeeping agencies such as AIM, the Psycho-Man, Doctor Doom and even S.H.I.E.L.D.
With world-altering research to support, graduates who assume positions of extraordinary power, and a $24.9 billion endowment to marshal for better or worse, Yale administrators face huge opportunity costs as they parcel out their days. Many hours must be spent looking after undergraduates, who experience problems as serious as clinical depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, and sexual assault. Administrators also help others, who struggle with financial stress or being the first in their families to attend college.
There’s a related question that has some bearing on the answer to the above question: what is a superhero? There have probably been books (or at least extensive Usenet threads) written on this topic, but a good baseline definition needs to acknowledge both the “super” and the “hero” parts. That is, the person needs to have some superhuman power or powers and has to fight the bad guys. But this basic definition is flawed. Superman is an alien, not human. Batman doesn’t have any super powers…he’s a self-made superhero like Syndrome in The Incredibles. Or can a superhero be anyone (human or no) that fights bad guys and is superior to normal heroes…the cream of the hero crop? And what about a costume or alter ego…are they essential for superheroism? These are all questions well-suited for asking the internet, so have at it: what’s a good definition for a superhero?
Cartman's reference to not introducing solo films for "the black superhero" or "the chick", in "phase three", is a reference to the upcoming release of the 2018 film Black Panther by Marvel Studios, the first solo film about the titular black superhero, and the later 2019 release of Captain Marvel by the same studio, which will be Marvel Studios' first solo film with a female superheroine. They are considered part of Marvel's own third phase of films.
In No More- a story arc starting in Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man #303- a trip to the past to retrieve vital information resulted in Peter Parker changing his past when his younger self decided to abandon being Spider-Man because he felt, based on what he had seen and overheard of his future self's life, that such a career would only bring him pain and suffering. As a result, Peter Parker became a successful industrialist married to Gwen Stacy, but Norman Osborn has conquered the world, killing Iron Man and most of the Fantastic Four and imprisoning Doctor Doom, with Peter still hiding behind his corporate role even as Gwen discreetly aids the resistance as he believes that taking action as Spider-Man will only make things worse.
If Melmac's not far out enough for you, why not try a whole other galaxy (one that's far, far away!). The Wampa on the Ice Planet Hoth might have gotten *this close* to eating poor Luke Skywalker for breakfast, but this furry costume captures the animal's appearance before he had a run in with Luke's lightsaber. This intricately designed faux fur and vinyl detailed costume is Star Wars officially licensed, and ready for action right here on planet Earth!
Jump up ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 77. ISBN 978-0756692360. With every bit of order in Spider-Man's life came a fair amount of disorder, and in this [Gerry] Conway/[Ross] Andru issue, that chaos came in the form of another new Spider-Man villain, the Grizzly.
This series debuted on Fox October 2, 1999 and lasted through March 31, 2001. Spider-Man, in this series, was voiced by Rino Romano (making him the only voice actor to play both Spider-Man and Batman, the most-recognized characters from both DC and Marvel). This animated series was supposed to be the continuation of Spider-Man: The Animated Series show from 1994. This series would also take part in the future. The series starts off at the Polaris One site where JJJ's son, John Jameson is talking to the public. About 6 months ago, through an advanced space warp drive engine, the man made probe called Alita projected itself to the far side of the sun where Alita recorded an exact duplicate of Earth. An Earth-like planet in the same orbit on the other side of the sun. John continues to talk about the probe being destroyed. Since then, people question should there be a man-made mission to go to " Counter Earth". He goes on to say that there should be one to find out what was responsible for this and there should be an investigation. Peter then leaves to change into costume because his spider-sense is tingling. He sees Venom and Carnage and confronts them. The spaceship is readying for take off and Spidey battles Venom and Carnage while wondering what they are doing and why were they trying to stow away on the spaceship. Venom restrains Spidey and Carnage tells him that nothing will get in the way of them going to "Counter Earth" and joining the Synoptic. Spider-Man gets kicked off the flight and gets blamed for what happens to John during his mission. Six months later, they launch the Solaris II rescue mission to go to "Counter Earth". The Webslinger appears with his new suit featuring nano technology "borrowed" from the lab of Reed Richards. Microscopic robots cover his entire body with anti-symbiote devices. He is stopped by Nick Fury who gives Spidey a chance to redeem himself by taking the space shuttle to "Counter Earth", so he can go rescue John Jameson. Once on "Counter Earth", after almost being burned up on entry, Peter is under arrest and is sought out by Lord Tyger and the High Evolutionary. Spidey meets the people who are chasing him, known as the Knights of Wondergore. Lord Tyger introduces himself and the rest of the Knights of Wondergore; Ursula, Lady Vermin, and Sir Ram. While being chased throughout the city, he realizes that there is a high tech society where humanoid animals have taken over and the normal people live in the overpopulated slums. He was captured and told of what happened by the High Evolutionary who came from another planet to seek a place where petty humans squabbles; greed, selfishness, violence, and hatred was no more. He built his paradise with many experiments, using animals that he now calls Beastials. They are under the leadership of the High Evolutionary, are stronger, faster, and free of the primitive human mind. Spider-Man was rescued by the resistance who had been told that the war lasted for 50 years. Spidey finds John in the resistance deciding to stay until the humans are free of the High Evolutionary's oppression. Peter blends in with the humans to see what the "Counter Earth" world was like. After saving Shane Yamada-Jones from the robots, Naoko, Shane's mother, a doctor, helps Peter. He takes him into their home, providing Peter pays rent, giving him two weeks rent free for saving Shane's life. This series doesn't last long. Only thirteen episodes were broadcast ending with a cliffhanger. Six more episodes were made for the second season but were never aired.
Amazing Fantasy Avenging Spider-Man Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man Marvel Team-Up/Spider-Man Team-Up Peter Parker: Spider-Man The Sensational Spider-Man vol. 1 Marvel Knights Spider-Man/The Sensational Spider-Man vol. 2 Spider-Man and Zoids Spider-Man Family/The Amazing Spider-Man Family Spider-Man's Tangled Web Spider-Man Unlimited Spidey The Superior Foes of Spider-Man The Superior Spider-Man Superior Spider-Man Team-Up Untold Tales of Spider-Man Web of Spider-Man Webspinners: Tales of Spider-Man
Jump up ^ Döring, Dr. Volkskundler Alois (2011). "Süßes, Saures – olle Kamellen? Ist Halloween schon wieder out?" (in German). Westdeutscher Rundfunk. Archived from the original on 2011-06-14. Retrieved 12 November 2015. Dr. Alois Döring ist wissenschaftlicher Referent für Volkskunde beim LVR-Institut für Landeskunde und Regionalgeschichte Bonn. Er schrieb zahlreiche Bücher über Bräuche im Rheinland, darunter das Nachschlagewerk "Rheinische Bräuche durch das Jahr". Darin widerspricht Döring der These, Halloween sei ursprünglich ein keltisch-heidnisches Totenfest. Vielmehr stamme Halloween von den britischen Inseln, der Begriff leite sich ab von "All Hallows eve", Abend vor Allerheiligen. Irische Einwanderer hätten das Fest nach Amerika gebracht, so Döring, von wo aus es als "amerikanischer" Brauch nach Europa zurückkehrte.
An African-American woman acting as the newest Captain Universe joins the Avengers[22] in the fight against Ex Nihilo, his sister Abyss, and the Builder named Aleph on Mars. Captain Universe vaporizes Aleph when he does not agree to stop transforming or destroying planets.[23] She is revealed to be Tamara Devoux, a woman who remained in a coma for ten years after a car crash. During a talk with Nightmask, she translates his language and announces that not only is the universe dying, but the White Event is coming.[24]
In Civil War, Spider-Man is introduced as a young vigilante operating out of Queens. Tony Stark tracks down Peter and recruits him to help stop Captain America's team of fugitive heroes before the situation can escalate any further. During the battle, Spider-Man faces off against the Falcon and the Winter Soldier, but is thwarted by Falcon's Redwing drone. He later fights against Captain America, but is outsmarted and defeated by the veteran hero's superior tactical abilities. Spider-Man plays a major role in taking down Giant-Man, allowing Iron Man and War Machine to finish him off. However, Peter is injured in the process, causing Iron Man to send him back home.
In the "House of M", a Marvel crossover, the Scarlet Witch alters reality to make mutants the ruling class over humans. This world is ruled by mutants and their leader, Magneto. In the mini-series Spider-Man: House of M, Peter Parker is believed to be a mutant, and Spider-Man's identity is widely known. He is rich, famous and married to Gwen Stacy, and they have a young son named Ritchie. Aunt May and Uncle Ben are alive and in good health, and J. Jonah Jameson is Peter's often-abused publicist. Unfortunately, his life unravels when Jameson reveals to the world that Spider-Man is not a born mutant. After the world is restored to normal, Peter suffers terribly with the memory of the life he left behind, expressing a desire to kill Magneto, whom he mistakenly believes was behind the events of House of M, and the Scarlet Witch, whose powers were responsible for the altered reality.[6] This version is later killed by Karn during the Spider-Verse event.[7]

At the behest of a deadly benefactor known only as the Gentleman, the Chameleon must assemble a new Sinister Six: Dr. Octopus, the Vulture, Electro, Mysterio, and the Gentleman's mysterious ward, Pity. But Mysterio, the master of illusion, has a plan of his own! A number of Hollywood people has been targeted for murder, and the Webhead must halt Mysterio's deadly rampage before more lives are claimed.

Okay, so Lt. Dangle might not be the first thing you think of when you think "sex appeal" but face it, with that mustache and those short shorts, well, dang, Dangle can work it! Even if the mustache is a signature cop look, and the shorts are for optimal performance when chasing criminals...we're sure that he's a real catch for anyone in the Reno dating scene.


Spider-Man also has incredible durability to blunt trauma as his body is much tougher than that of a normal person. He can withstand such levels of damage and punishment that would kill non-super powered individuals. For example he has frequently taken blows from characters with high levels of superhuman strength (Hulk, Venom, Rhino, Puma, Green Goblin etc) without sustaining significant injury. He has also survived the force of having a building collapse on him multiple times. This durability extends to falling from great heights. For example, he was once knocked through three buildings by Mr Negative before falling multiple stories to the ground, yet still remained conscious. His durability to blunt trauma also extends to explosive forces, and he has taken explosions with the force of a hand grenade and recovered nearly instantly in a recent fight with the Juggernaut. In the Sins Past Storyline he tanked a building destroying explosion, but was significantly weakened afterwards. The toughness of Spider-Man is such that he often rolls with the blows of punches thrown by non-powered foes to avoid injuring them- when he once decided to tense his abdominal muscles against the blows of a trained boxer, the boxer broke his wrists. Scorpion once described Spider-Man's body "as being as hard as concrete".


An African-American woman acting as the newest Captain Universe joins the Avengers[22] in the fight against Ex Nihilo, his sister Abyss, and the Builder named Aleph on Mars. Captain Universe vaporizes Aleph when he does not agree to stop transforming or destroying planets.[23] She is revealed to be Tamara Devoux, a woman who remained in a coma for ten years after a car crash. During a talk with Nightmask, she translates his language and announces that not only is the universe dying, but the White Event is coming.[24]

Jump up ^ Hörandner, Editha (2005). Halloween in der Steiermark und anderswo. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 99. ISBN 9783825888893. On the other hand the postmodern phenomenon of "antifashion" is also to be found in some Halloween costumes. Black and orange are a 'must' with many costumes. Halloween - like the medieval danse macabre - is closely connected with superstitions and it might be a way of dealing with death in a playful way.
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