Further customization comes with exploring the town as the New Kid fills out a 'character sheet' - finding characters who specialize in this fields and talking to them ad fulfilling tasks helps you discover your gender, race, economic class, etc. Of course, this still South Park, so none of it only matters - the Rednecks will try to beat you up anyway. (Some of the dialogue does change a little.)
After Octavius tries to retrieve some of Parker’s memories in an attempt to solve a revirbium related problem, Peter's consciousness begins to re-emerge, having somehow escaped the mind-purge. When Otto is possessed by the Venom Symbiote and is unable to free himself of it, Peter's consciousness again emerges and breaks the Symbiote's hold over Dr. Octopus, enabling Flash Thompson to call it back to him.
It seemed that Spider-man was finally back on track, with his name cleared and his life finally looking a bit better than it had in recent months. Norman Osborn however kept being a disturbing presence to Peter and Mary Jane. He started a ritual known as the Gathering of the Five, with one person getting Ultimate power, one got death, one got insanity and so on. Norman thought he gained power, but it turned out that it was insanity that he got. He attacked and kidnapped Peter. While he was captive, Peter got the shock of a life-time. His aunt May was standing in front of him, alive and well. After Spider-man broke free and defeated Norman Osborn, seemingly for good, as he was taken to a mental hospital, Peter learned that it was in fact aunt May he found. Not a clone, not a hoax. Norman had apparently kidnapped May years ago, and had an actress surgically look like aunt May and play her part while she was dying. This was why 'aunt May' knew about Peter being Spider-Man, she was hired by Norman Osborn to play her! Reed Richards of the Fantastic Four assured Peter it was his aunt. Peter saw this as a sign and stopped being Spider-Man altogether, finally living a good life with his aunt May and his wife Mary-Jane.
Peter Benjamin Parker is a photographer for the Daily Bugle newspaper under Editor-in-Chief Joe Robertson. Parker is also the friendly costumed hero Spider-Man. Spider-Man possesses the abilities of Earth arachnids, allowing him to fire thread-like projectiles from his wrists. These threads may be used to spin webs of near-limitless size, as well as to capture thieves and other assorted rogues in the selfsame manner as a spider entraps traditional insects. Those who wonder about his boundless strength would be advised to listen closely, as his spectacular might is the result of radioactive energy flowing through his very veins. The aforementioned web-like materials fired from his wrists can also be used as a means of swinging to and fro, meaning that those who wish to observe the Spider-Man in action can best do so by simply looking overhead. In addition, he is known to be primarily a nocturnal adventurer, appearing in the deep of night wherever evil is afoot. His alacrity is so great, his timing so amazing, he has been compared to a flash of light. Despite his best efforts and good intentions, it seems that his attempts at justice are often overlooked, and while other heroes may find celebrity and fortune, poor Parker is constantly in one hang-up or another. Regardless, the Spider-Man soldiers on; wherever there is a fight or ruckus or tussle, the Spider-Man can be found!
Indira "Indy" Daimonji (appeared in Spider-Man: The New Animated Series): She is Peter Parker's potential love interest and a rival of Mary Jane Watson. She works at a news network down in Manhattan. She is seriously injured by Spider-Man in the series finale when Spider-Man is tricked by the Gaines Twins into injuring Indy. This led to Peter giving up being Spider-Man
The word Halloween or Hallowe'en dates to about 1745[31] and is of Christian origin.[32] The word "Hallowe'en" means "hallowed evening" or "holy evening".[33] It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows' Eve (the evening before All Hallows' Day).[34] In Scots, the word "eve" is even, and this is contracted to e'en or een. Over time, (All) Hallow(s) E(v)en evolved into Hallowe'en. Although the phrase "All Hallows'" is found in Old English "All Hallows' Eve" is itself not seen until 1556.[34][35]
In subsequent decades, popular characters like Dazzler, She-Hulk, Elektra, Catwoman, Witchblade, Spider-Girl, Batgirl and the Birds of Prey became stars of long-running eponymous titles. Female characters began assuming leadership roles in many ensemble superhero teams; the Uncanny X-Men series and its related spin-off titles in particular have included many female characters in pivotal roles since the 1970s.[33] Volume 4 of the X-Men comic book series featured an all-female team as part of the Marvel NOW! branding initiative in 2013.[34] Superpowered female characters like Buffy the Vampire Slayer[35] and Darna[36][37] have a tremendous influence on popular culture in their respective countries of origin.

The Mutant X version of Spider-Man diverges from his mainstream counterpart in Amazing Spider-Man #102, in that he was unable or unwilling to cure himself of having six arms. For unexplained reasons, he reverses his name to Man-Spider. A third divergence occurs when he and his clone continue to coexist after the end of the original Clone Saga. The two keep this a secret by taking care to never appear in public at the same time,[19] but "Man-Spider" is forced to admit the truth after his clone is killed by Madelyne Pryor.[20] He himself is later killed.[21]
On Hallowe'en (All Hallows' Eve), in Poland, believers were once taught to pray out loud as they walk through the forests in order that the souls of the dead might find comfort; in Spain, Christian priests in tiny villages toll their church bells in order to remind their congregants to remember the dead on All Hallows' Eve.[196] In Ireland, and among immigrants in Canada, a custom includes the Christian practice of abstinence, keeping All Hallows' Eve as a meat-free day, and serving pancakes or colcannon instead.[197] In Mexico children make an altar to invite the return of the spirits of dead children (angelitos).[198]
[32] Researchers conducted a survey for the National Retail Federation in the United States and found that 53.3 percent of consumers planned to buy a costume for Halloween 2005, spending $38.11 on average (up $10 from the year before). They were also expected to spend $4.96 billion in 2006, up significantly from just $3.3 billion the previous year.[33] The troubled economy has caused many Americans to cut back on Halloween spending. In 2009, the National Retail Federation anticipated that American households would decrease Halloween spending by as much as 15% to $56.31.[34] In 2013, Americans spent an estimated $6.9 billion to celebrate Halloween, including a predicted $2.6 billion on costumes (with more spent on adult costumes than for children's costumes) and $330 million on pet costumes.[35][36] In 2017 it was estimated that Americans would spend $9.1 billion on Halloween merchandise with $3.4 billion of that being on spend on Halloween costumes.[37]
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