In 1952, Osamu Tezuka's manga Tetsuwan Atom, more popularly known in the West as Astro Boy, was published. The series focused upon a robot boy built by a scientist to replace his deceased son. Being built from an incomplete robot originally intended for military purposes Astro Boy possessed amazing powers such as flight through thrusters in his feet and the incredible mechanical strength of his limbs.
In an alternate Civil War reality where the conflict continued after the anti-registration side's attempt to escape the Negative Zone prison triggered a self-destruct that destroyed most of New York, Peter continued serving on Captain America's side in the conflict and was given new upgrades such as wings that bear a resemblance to the Falcon, with Rogers noting that Peter is now his fastest operative. Since Mary-Jane and his daughter Maybelle live on Iron Man's terrain due to them not getting the chance to evacuate, he hardly gets the chance to see them. Following Steve's death in the final battle, Peter becomes the leader of Steve's side called "the Blue" and collaborates with Jennifer Walters who is the new leader of "The Iron."
As part of the Avengers, Spider-Man traveled to Latveria to investigate Doctor Doom's apparent attack on the neighboring country, Symkaria. Upon arrival, he and his fellow heroes found a dome-shaped structure emitting radiation and broke into it. Inside the building, they came under attack from automated laser turrets, and while Spider-Man was busy webbing them up and cracking jokes, he was suddenly electrocuted into submission and kidnapped by Runabout. When he regained consciousness, he found himself strapped to a table by a giant robot named Megatron, who explained that the hero was about to help him and his Decepticons conquer the world. Man and Machine, Part One Megatron began extracting Spider-Man's radioactive blood, refining it into a powerful energon isotope that he used to supercharge his troops. All Spidey could do was lay there and weakly taunt him. Man and Machine, Part Two

Peter becomes desperate to save May. He makes a deal with Mephisto who offers to save his aunt and restore the secrecy of his identity in exchange for erasing Peter's marriage to MJ. Mephisto gives the couple One More Day to decide (hence the title of the story) and Peter reluctantly agrees. He then wakes up in the house of May who is alive and well with no recollection of the deal. This marks the beginning of the Brand New Day era, in which Harry Osborn is alive and Spider-Man meets new friends and foes. He fights new villains including Mister Negative, Screwball, the Spider-Mugger, Menace who is the girlfriend of Harry, Kraven's daughter Ana Kravinoff in the story Kraven's First Hunt, the New Vulture in 24/7, teams-up with Anti-Venom to fight Norman Osborn's Thunderbolts in New Ways to Die and is accused of murder during the Character Assassination story. When the Secret Invasion took place, Spider-Man helped his fellow heroes in fighting off the invading Skrulls.
Since the school's decathlon team were heading to Washington, D.C. for the national tournament, Parker rejoined the team. Once the decathlon team arrived, Parker prepared to pursue the Vulture's gang once more. While removing the tracker from his suit, Leeds learned that the Training Wheels Protocol monitored his suit. Eager to prove himself to Tony Stark, Parker convinced Leeds to disable the protocol before pursuing the criminals.
Spider-Man's plight was to be misunderstood and persecuted by the very public that he swore to protect. In the first issue of The Amazing Spider-Man, J. Jonah Jameson, publisher of the Daily Bugle, launches an editorial campaign against the "Spider-Man menace." The resulting negative publicity exacerbates popular suspicions about the mysterious Spider-Man and makes it impossible for him to earn any more money by performing. Eventually, the bad press leads the authorities to brand him an outlaw. Ironically, Peter finally lands a job as a photographer for Jameson's Daily Bugle.[9]:212
In a Manhattan warehouse, an innocent man has been murdered during a mysterious crime. Evidence points to the involvement of Venom-- the alien symbiote who is obsessed with Spider-Man's destruction. Yet Venom has always safeguarded innocent lives--- has he gone completely around the bend, or is there another suspect?Spider-Man thinks there is more to the crime than meets the eye. The spectre of the Hobgoblin, one of Spider-Man's nastiest villains, falls on a series of thefts, and leads the web-slinger to a deadly secret that may cause New York's destruction. Spider-Man must outsmart two of his most lethal foes to save the city-- but even more danger awaits him!

^ Besides being most notable as a Spider-Man supervillain. He has also been depicted as a Fantastic Four antagonist in Stan Lee and Jack Kirby comics books (mostly due to being introduced as the original Frightful Four[142]) along with being on the heroic side (being a Avengers member[143]) until being introduced as a tragic supervillain in the Spider-Man comics once again.[144]
Writers and artists over the years have established a rogues gallery of supervillains to face Spider-Man. In comics and in other media. As with the hero, the majority of the villains' powers originate with scientific accidents or the misuse of scientific technology, and many have animal-themed costumes or powers.[note 6] Examples are listed down below in the ordering of their original chronological appearance:      Indicates a group.
^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 25. ISBN 978-0756692360. The Amazing Spider-Man #13 saw [Stan] Lee and [Steve] Ditko return to the creation of new super villains. This issue marked the debut of Mysterio, a former special effects expert named Quentin Beck.

I agree with some of the earlier posts. I would say that Greek legends (and even earlier) would be the first superheros. As for the comment about Superhero’s being believable. Current Superhero’s mmight not be believed in by their writers, but young children stilll believe in Superhero’s. The writers just stopped believing what they were talking about.


[32] Researchers conducted a survey for the National Retail Federation in the United States and found that 53.3 percent of consumers planned to buy a costume for Halloween 2005, spending $38.11 on average (up $10 from the year before). They were also expected to spend $4.96 billion in 2006, up significantly from just $3.3 billion the previous year.[33] The troubled economy has caused many Americans to cut back on Halloween spending. In 2009, the National Retail Federation anticipated that American households would decrease Halloween spending by as much as 15% to $56.31.[34] In 2013, Americans spent an estimated $6.9 billion to celebrate Halloween, including a predicted $2.6 billion on costumes (with more spent on adult costumes than for children's costumes) and $330 million on pet costumes.[35][36] In 2017 it was estimated that Americans would spend $9.1 billion on Halloween merchandise with $3.4 billion of that being on spend on Halloween costumes.[37]
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