What sets the superhero apart from the “everyday” hero such as the fireman who’s job is to do things that might be seen is perfectly heroic, is that the Superhero generally is symbolic. The superhero does what nobody else is doing, in a way that most people can’t, at least not readily. Batman has, in some incarnations, rationalized that he does what he does because nobody else can. Notice if you will, that most if not all superheroes are beyond (but not neccessarily above) what regular people think of as the law. Superman regularly does things that would, if you think about it, break scores of laws. And the activities of Batman - or Robin Hood - go without saying. Part of what makes the superhero super, perhaps, is his ability to perform these duties and not abuse the fact that he must operate outside the normal bounds of citizens.
"Costume" often refers to a particular style of clothing worn to portray the wearer as a character or type of character at a social event in a theatrical performance on the stage or in film or television. In combination with other aspects of stagecraft, theatrical costumes can help actors portray characters' and their contexts as well as communicate information about the historical period/era, geographic location and time of day, season or weather of the theatrical performance. Some stylized theatrical costumes, such as Harlequin and Pantaloon in the Commedia dell'arte, exaggerate an aspect of a character.
In the 1930s, both trends came together in some of the earliest superpowered costumed heroes such as Japan's Ōgon Bat[9][10] (visualized in painted panels used by kamishibai oral storytellers in Japan since 1931), Mandrake the Magician[11][12][13] (1934), Superman in 1938 and Captain Marvel (1939) at the beginning of the Golden Age of Comic Books. The precise era of the Golden Age of Comic Books is disputed, though most agree that it was started with the launch of Superman in 1938.[14] Superman remains one of the most recognizable Superheroes to this day.[14] The success of Superman spawned a whole new genre of characters with secret identities and superhuman powers – the Superhero genre.[14]
At Yale, every residential college has a “master”––a professor who lives in residence with their family, and is responsible for its academic, intellectual, and social life.  “Masters work with students to shape each residential college community,” Yale states, “bringing their own distinct social, cultural, and intellectual influences to the colleges.” The approach is far costlier than what’s on offer at commuter schools, but aims to create a richer intellectual environment where undergrads can learn from faculty and one another even outside the classroom.
J. Jonah Jameson is depicted as the publisher of the Daily Bugle and is Peter Parker's boss and as a harsh critic of Spider-Man, always saying negative things about the superhero in the newspaper. Despite his role as Jameson's publishing editor and confidant Robbie Robertson is always depicted as a supporter of both Peter Parker and Spider-Man.[47]
As the embittered webslinger faces further robot attacks, each deadlier than the last, his spider-sense warns that Jameson himself is behind them, possibly colluding with Electro, Alistaire Smythe, or another of Spider-Man's mortal foes. Convinced that his worst critic has become a mortal enemy, Spider-Man declares war on Jameson -- a war the publisher is eager to wage. But in their relentless pursuit of victory, they both risk losing everything that matters to them -- and may both fall victim to the cataclysmic secret behind the robots.
Spider-Man Noir appears as a playable character in Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions, voiced by Christopher Daniel Barnes. His reality is one of four alternate dimensions that is seeded by pieces of the Tablet of Order and Chaos.[15] Spider-Man Noir can blend into the shadows to do sneak attacks on enemies. After the defeats of the Noir versions of Hammerhead, Vulture and Green Goblin, and claims his tablet fragments, he, together with the other three Spider-Men, is teleported to their location by Madame Web to fight Mysterio, who had absorbed the Tablet and effectively became a god. After the defeat of Mysterio, the Noir and other Spider-Men return to their own realities.
Dr. Watts (appeared in Spider-Man 2: Enter Electro): Dr. Watts (first name unknown) is a prominent scientist. She is the creator of the Bio-Nexus Device and a world-renowned scholar of biology. In the game, she is kidnapped by Hammerhead while attending the Science Industry Ball. During Spider-Man's fight with Hammerhead, Dr. Watts disappears, which led Spider-Man to believe that the Sandman took her. Due to an anonymous tip, Spider-Man tracks Dr. Watts to a museum, where she is taken hostage by Electro. After Electro leaves the museum, Dr. Watts tells Spider-Man that Electro went to the Twin Towers.

A version of Peter Parker exists, who is a child abused by his Uncle Ben. While locked in the cellar, he is befriended by a large spider-like creature, the Tallus instructs Blink and Nocturne to lead this universe's incarnation of Wolverine to the run down shack the Parkers call home, a fight ensues and the creature and Wolverine are both slain, as Blink and Nocturne depart this reality, it is shown that the creature bit the young Peter.[4]


Samhain (/ˈsɑːwɪn, ˈsaʊɪn/) was the first and most important of the four quarter days in the medieval Gaelic calendar and was celebrated on 31 October – 1 November in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man.[39][40] A kindred festival was held at the same time of year by the Brittonic Celts, called Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Kalan Gwav in Cornwall and Kalan Goañv in Brittany; a name meaning "first day of winter". For the Celts, the day ended and began at sunset; thus the festival began on the evening before 7 November by modern reckoning(the half point between equinox and solstice).[41] Samhain and Calan Gaeaf are mentioned in some of the earliest Irish and Welsh literature. The names have been used by historians to refer to Celtic Halloween customs up until the 19th century,[42] and are still the Gaelic and Welsh names for Halloween.
In Bhutan there is a traditional national dress prescribed for men and women, including the monarchy. These have been in vogue for thousands of years and have developed into a distinctive dress style. The dress worn by men is known as Gho which is a robe worn up to knee-length and is fastened at the waist by a band called the Kera. The front part of the dress which is formed like a pouch, in olden days was used to hold baskets of food and short dagger, but now it is used to keep cell phone, purse and the betel nut called Doma. The dress worn by women consist of three pieces known as Kira, Tego and Wonju. The long dress which extends up to the ankle is Kira. The jacket worn above this is Tego which is provided with Wonju, the inner jacket. However, while visiting the Dzong or monastery a long scarf or stoll, called Kabney is worn by men across the shoulder, in colours appropriate to their ranks. Women also wear scarfs or stolls called Rachus, made of raw silk with embroidery, over their shoulder but not indicative of their rank.[6]
Following the death of Ben Parker, Peter, and May faced a great deal of financial difficulties. With Aunt May being rather weak, Peter decided to become the breadwinner of the household, despite Aunt May asking that Peter instead focus on his studies. Peter considered using his Spider-Man identity for crime but decided against it, both for moral reasons, but also because he knew it would hurt Aunt May if he went to prison.
See also: Ethnic stereotypes in comics, African characters in comics, List of black superheroes, List of Asian superheroes, List of Latino superheroes, List of Native American superheroes, List of Jewish superheroes, List of Filipino superheroes, List of Middle Eastern superheroes, List of Russian superheroes, and List of Italian and Italian-American superheroes and villains
In Justice League (2001-2004) the Batsuit is once again redesigned, but combining elements from previous costumes, the design of The New Batman Adventures is retained, but with the blue highlights of the Batman: The Animated Series costume and the long ears of the Batman Beyond costume. It is also used again in Justice League: Unlimited (2004-2006).

In addition to the creation of new minority heroes, publishers have filled the identities and roles of once-Caucasian heroes with new characters from minority backgrounds. The African-American John Stewart appeared in the 1970s as an alternate for Earth's Green Lantern Hal Jordan, and would become a regular member of the Green Lantern Corps from the 1980s onward. The creators of the 2000s-era Justice League animated series selected Stewart as the show's Green Lantern. In the Ultimate Marvel universe, Miles Morales, a multiracial American youth who was also bitten by a genetically-altered spider, debuted as the new Spider-Man after the apparent death of the original. Kamala Khan, a Pakistani-American teenager who is revealed to have Inhuman lineage after her shapeshifting powers manifested, takes on the identity of Ms. Marvel in 2014. Her self-titled comic book series became a cultural phenomenon, with extensive media coverage by CNN, the New York Times and The Colbert Report, and embraced by anti-Islamophobia campaigners in San Francisco who plastered over anti-Muslim bus adverts with Kamala stickers.[57] Other such successor-heroes of color include James "Rhodey" Rhodes as Iron Man, Ryan Choi as the Atom, and Jaime Reyes as Blue Beetle.

In addition to the suit's continuous evolution, Batman keeps variant costumes for dealing with extraordinary situations; for example, he has been shown in a Scuba variant of his costume, a fireproof version for fighting his enemy Firefly, a thermally insulated version for fighting Mr. Freeze, as well as others. Many versions of the hero show him swapping his cloth costume for a suit of powered armor.

Most of the supervillains of Spider-Man would be introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man comic book starting with the Chameleon.[3] The early villains would be introduced in the 1960s in the Silver Age of Comic Books,[3] and created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko.[3] John Romita, Sr. replaced Ditko starting with the Rhino.[4] Gerry Conway later replaced Stan Lee and helped create new adversaries for the web-slinger and also helped pave the way to the Bronze Age of Comic Books with the death of Spider-Man's long time romantic interest, Gwen Stacy.[5][6][7] Many collaborators would soon take over The Amazing Spider-Man title. One of the more popular examples included Todd McFarlane's Venom in the Modern Age of Comic Books.[8]


If you're a guy, you probably spend most nights quoting your favorite movies, telling the latest jokes or mimicking superheroes, whether or not your properly dressed for the occasion. That's why Halloween is the perfect night for men. Is there another holiday where you can dress up like Bender and talk about your shiny metal posterior? And what other night can you dress up like a pirate captain and swing a sword around? What other night can you wear a cape, a Batman costume, all while pretending to fight crime, without the police getting involved. That's right, Halloween might be the best thing that's ever happened to men across the world, so you'd better make the best of it in one of our men's costumes.

In an alternate Civil War reality where the conflict continued after the anti-registration side's attempt to escape the Negative Zone prison triggered a self-destruct that destroyed most of New York, Peter continued serving on Captain America's side in the conflict and was given new upgrades such as wings that bear a resemblance to the Falcon, with Rogers noting that Peter is now his fastest operative. Since Mary-Jane and his daughter Maybelle live on Iron Man's terrain due to them not getting the chance to evacuate, he hardly gets the chance to see them. Following Steve's death in the final battle, Peter becomes the leader of Steve's side called "the Blue" and collaborates with Jennifer Walters who is the new leader of "The Iron."

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As Thanos begins to activate the completed Infinity Gaunlet, he is attacked by Thor who is able to severely wound him with his new axe Stormbreaker, but is unable to stop Thanos from activating the gauntlet despite the injuries he inflicted on Thanos. As half of all life across the universe disintegrates, including White Wolf, Black Panther, Groot, Scarlet Witch, Falcon, Mantis, Drax, Star-Lord, Doctor Strange and Spider-Man; Thanos teleports away to an unknown planet to recover from the wounds inflicted by Thor. Let stunned by their inability to stop Thanos and the deaths of their friends; The remaining heroes Iron Man, Nebula, Bruce, M'Baku, Okoye, War Machine, Rocket, Steve, Black Widow, and Thor are left on their respective battlefields of Wakanda and Titan are wondering what to do next.
Spider-Man's advanced musculature produces less fatigue toxins during physical activity than an ordinary human. This allows him to exert himself physically for much longer periods of time before fatigue begins to impair him. At his peak, Spider-Man can physically exert himself at his peak capacity for many hours before the build up of fatigue toxins in his blood begins to impair him. He once fought Morlun for many hours continuously, and has stated an ability to hold his breath for at least twice as long as non-enhanced humans.

This version of Spider-Man, after being blamed by J. Jonah Jameson for his son's disappearance exploring another planet named Counter-Earth, designs a new costume with sonic weaponry and stealth capabilities using nanotechnology borrowed from Reed Richards. Traveling to Counter-Earth himself, he joins a group of human revolutionaries led by John Jameson himself in resisting the High Evolutionary and his tyrannical rule, in which humans are brutally oppressed and the half-human, half-animal Beastials form the social elite. He also battles Venom and Carnage, who traveled with Jameson to Counter-Earth and are plotting to infect the entire planet with symbiotes.[volume & issue needed] He is killed by Daemos of the Inheritors, along with the Knights of Wundagore and many other Beastials.[42]


A Broadway musical, Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, began previews on November 14, 2010, at the Foxwoods Theatre on Broadway, with the official opening night on June 14, 2011.[199][200] The music and lyrics were written by Bono and The Edge of the rock group U2, with a book by Julie Taymor, Glen Berger, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa.[201] Turn Off the Dark is currently the most expensive musical in Broadway history, costing an estimated $70 million.[202] In addition, the show's unusually high running costs are reported to have been about $1.2 million per week.[203]
Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and hobby horses were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[65] From at least the 18th century, "imitating malignant spirits" led to playing pranks in Ireland and the Scottish Highlands. Wearing costumes and playing pranks at Halloween spread to England in the 20th century.[65] Traditionally, pranksters used hollowed out turnips or mangel wurzels often carved with grotesque faces as lanterns.[65] By those who made them, the lanterns were variously said to represent the spirits,[65] or were used to ward off evil spirits.[69][70] They were common in parts of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands in the 19th century,[65] as well as in Somerset (see Punkie Night). In the 20th century they spread to other parts of England and became generally known as jack-o'-lanterns.[65]
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