The armor was then coated with a black latex material to dampen Bruce's heat signature, making him difficult to detect with night-vision equipment. Made of a graphite material, the cowl acts as a protective helmet. The cowl's Kevlar lining is supposed to be bulletproof. A manufacturing defect in the graphite used in the production of the first shipment of the cowl's components made its outer shell incapable of withstanding blunt trauma (a flaw Alfred demonstrated to Bruce Wayne using a baseball bat). Batman apparently took on Falcone and his henchmen at the docks with the defective helmet. The second shipment was supposed to fix this problem. An advanced eavesdropping device is concealed within the cowl's right ear and enables Batman to listen in on conversations from a distance.
I’ve seen only brief mentions of The Phantom here - I’d have thought he was one of the earliest superheroes in comics. Checking Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Phantom - he’s described as the first costumed superhero, debuting in February 1936. So that predates some of the more well-known examples that started up a few years later (though maybe not the likes of The Shadow, but it depends on whether you think of him as a “costumed superhero” or not).
Spidey's next video game adventure was released on September 7th, 2010, in the form of Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions. In this game, you can play as four distinct Spider-Men in four different universes, in search of the shattered pieces of a legendary tablet. The game sometimes features sequences where the player is in first person and has to use the analog stick to win the fight, much like in some boxing games. The first dimension is the Amazing Universe (Earth 616), the world of regular comics Spider-Man that we know and love, voiced by Neil Patrick Harris. He uses mainly far-range combat to defeat his enemies, it is known he faces Sandman in this dimension. The second is the Noir Universe, which takes place in the 1940s, in a darker, stealthier, and grittier setting, where stealth and timing is crucial. In this dimension, Spider-Man Faces Hammerhead, Green Goblin and the Vulture. The third is 2099, taking place mostly in the skies, with many free falling levels. In this dimension, Spider-Man faces the Hobgoblin with a new, more advanced look. The final dimension is the Ultimate Universe, where Spider-Man has somehow been reunited with the Venom symbiote as his "gift" from Madame Webb. He battles Deadpool and many other bosses with symbiote tendrils and many more attacks. Carnage is the main boss of this dimension. In the end you battle a immensely empowered god-level Mysterio.
The Batsuit has an electrical system that can shock assailants as a last resort. The Batsuit is made of triple-weave kevlar centered around the most obvious target, the chest-mounted Bat symbol. Though the suit has been drawn many different ways by different artists, and the stories themselves have described Batman as modifying the details of his costume from time to time, it is most often depicted as consisting of a scalloped cape, a bat-like cowl, a pair of gloves, boots, a yellow utility belt, and a tight-fitting body suit with the image of a bat emblazoned on the chest.
While trying to stop a robbery, Spider-Man is blamed for the accidental shooting of an innocent bystander. This makes the web-slinger the perfect target for anti-super hero mayoral candidate Brian Timilty. However, Timilty is secretly the pawn of Tyler Stewart, a wealthy businessman seeking to take over New York's crime syndicates. Wanted by police and forced into hiding, Spider-Man must find a way to clear his name without being shot on sight. And that's when Electro and Rhino--two of his deadliest foes--arrive on the scene to complicate matters.

Supported by a system similar to that of Tony Stark's classic Iron Man design, The Iron Spider armor features many gadgets, including four mechanical spider-arms, or "waldoes", that can be used to see around corners (via cameras in the tips) and to manipulate objects indirectly. Stark describes them as too delicate to use in combat, yet Spider-Man shortly afterward uses them to smash through the sensors in Titanium Man's helmet. Later on during the "Civil War" storyline, he uses them (reluctantly) during his fight with Captain America.
Eventually, Vulture's Chitauri alien weapon malfunctioned. Spider-Man tried to web the weapon up and contain its energy, only for it to short-circuit and cut the ferry in half. Spider-Man attempted to save the ferry's occupants; at his request, Karen quickly calculated the strongest points of the ship, and Spider-Man linked 98 percent of those points together. However, he had missed two percent of the points, and it was this oversight that caused Spider-Man's webs to fail. Spider-Man desperately bound both halves of the ship together, though it kept falling apart. Iron Man eventually arrived to assist in Spider-Man's rescue, sealing the ship by reforging the cutlines. After that, he took Spider-Man away to have a private talk.[2]
Spidey managed to get the Autobots past the army with a little subterfuge, which lasted about ten seconds. While the Autobots dealt with both the human army and some invading Decepticons, he and Gears made their way into the base. After dispatching the cassettes and Soundwave, the pair found Sparkplug, and Megatron! He used his webbing to completely mummify Megatron, but it didn't hold for very long. Megatron blasted a hole in the floor of their base, so Gears, and Sparkplug would plummet to their deaths. Webbing saved Spider and Spark, but couldn't hold Gears's weight.
Erika Christakis was questioning that practice when she composed her email, adding nuance to a conversation that some students were already having. Traditionally, she began, Halloween is both a day of subversion for young people and a time when adults exert their control over their behavior: from bygone, overblown fears about candy spiked with poison or razorblades to a more recent aversion to the sugar in candy.
Unbeknownst to Thanos, while he and Gamora were off retrieving the Soul Stone, Nebula escaped from his ship and contacted the remaining guardians telling them to meet her Thanos' destroyed homeworld, Titan. Iron Man and Spider-Man eventually track down Maw's ship and successfully rescue Doctor Strange after killing his captor Ebony Maw. Taking their newly acquired ship to Titan, Spider-Man, Iron-Man and Doctor Strange meet up with Nebual, Star-Lord, Drax, and Mantis. After getting to know and appraising each other on the situation, group forms a plan to remove Thanos' Infinity Gauntlet after Doctor Strange uses the Time Stone to view millions of possible futures, seeing only one in which Thanos loses. Shortly after forming this plan, Thanos arrives on Titan and, in an attempt convince the heroes to surrender the Time Stone to him, Thanos explains his reasons for wanting to wipe out half the population of the universe in a vain attempt to justify his plan as a necessary evil in order to ensure the survival of a universe threatened by overpopulation. His attempts at peaceful negotiation falling on deaf ears, the heroes attack Thanos and appear to have successfully subdued the mad titan until Nebula deduces that Thanos has killed Gamora. Enraged at the thought of the woman he loved being gone, Star-Lord attempts to kill Thanos which unfortunately allows Thanos to break the group's hold and overpower them. Iron Man is seriously wounded by Thanos, but is spared after Doctor Strange surrenders the Time Stone to Thanos.

^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 40. ISBN 978-0756692360. Although he made his debut in the previous issue, it was in this [Stan] Lee and [John] Romita tale [The Amazing Spider-Man #51] that the Kingpin - real name Wilson Fisk - really left his mark on organized crime.
Part of the joy of Halloween is indulging your dark side. These boys scary clown Halloween costumes are the kind that are far more likely to make your son’s friends recoil in fear than grin—and that’s exactly what he wants! Give him a chance to terrify your neighborhood as he goes around collecting candy dressed as a Sinister Jester. This black and red costume features a very spooky mask with a terrifying grin, plus a hood with collar to add to the creepy sensation. No one will recognize him as he walks the street waiting to hear gleeful screams in response.
By the end of the 12th century they had become holy days of obligation across Europe and involved such traditions as ringing church bells for the souls in purgatory. In addition, "it was customary for criers dressed in black to parade the streets, ringing a bell of mournful sound and calling on all good Christians to remember the poor souls."[82] "Souling", the custom of baking and sharing soul cakes for all christened souls,[83] has been suggested as the origin of trick-or-treating.[84] The custom dates back at least as far as the 15th century[85] and was found in parts of England, Flanders, Germany and Austria.[55] Groups of poor people, often children, would go door-to-door during Allhallowtide, collecting soul cakes, in exchange for praying for the dead, especially the souls of the givers' friends and relatives.[85][86][87] Soul cakes would also be offered for the souls themselves to eat,[55] or the 'soulers' would act as their representatives.[88] As with the Lenten tradition of hot cross buns, Allhallowtide soul cakes were often marked with a cross, indicating that they were baked as alms.[89] Shakespeare mentions souling in his comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[90] On the custom of wearing costumes, Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognized by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[91]
Spider Woman a.k.a. Spider-Gwen might be from an alternate universe, but with her stylish look we think she’d be right at home on any planet. With this costume’s sleek hoodie and dynamic color scheme we’re sure you’re going to love pretending you’re the one who got bit by a radioactive spider. Give this cool costume a try to bring this up-and-coming superhero to life!
In Scotland, Midnight and Glaive ambush Scarlet Witch and the Vision in an attempt to forcibly remove the Mind Stone located in the Vision's head. Since removing the stone would also kill the Vision, the two heroes attempt to resist, but are overwhelmed by Thanos' children. When it looks like that they will succeeded in taking the Mind Stone; Steve, Black Widow and Falcon swoop in and resuce their comrades from Midnight and Glaive before regrouping with War Machine and Bruce at the New Avengers Facility in upstate New York. Realizing that their assailants won't rest till they have the stone and not wanting to see any of his friends or loved ones get hurt trying to stop them, the Vision offers to sacrifice himself by having Scarlet Witch destroy the Mind Stone to keep it out of the hands of Thanos' children. Rather then sacrifice his friend, Steve suggests that they go to Black Panther for help citing that Wakandan science might have a way to remove the stone without killing the Vision.
Dr. Watts (appeared in Spider-Man 2: Enter Electro): Dr. Watts (first name unknown) is a prominent scientist. She is the creator of the Bio-Nexus Device and a world-renowned scholar of biology. In the game, she is kidnapped by Hammerhead while attending the Science Industry Ball. During Spider-Man's fight with Hammerhead, Dr. Watts disappears, which led Spider-Man to believe that the Sandman took her. Due to an anonymous tip, Spider-Man tracks Dr. Watts to a museum, where she is taken hostage by Electro. After Electro leaves the museum, Dr. Watts tells Spider-Man that Electro went to the Twin Towers.
The title follows almost the entire original timeline of the character up until the first attempt at a "relaunch" by the company, 1999, where it deviates and provides an alternative ending to the Final Chapter storyline. Peter's wayward daughter May is revealed to be alive and well, and is returned to both Parkers by Peter's first clone, the redeemed Kaine. Despite now being a father, Peter continues to fight crime as Spider-Man, and begins to cope with the new responsibilities brought by his baby daughter.[volume & issue needed]
Spider-Man has been featured numerous times in Hasbro's Marvel Legends series. He first appeared in the Movie Sandman Build-a-Figure wave in both his outfit from the first movie and his black costume from Spider-Man 3. He was next featured in the Arnim Zola Build-a-Figure series, this time sporting his Big Time costume. The movie version of Spider-Man from The Amazing Spider-Man 2 was then featured in the Ultimate Green Goblin Build-a-Figure wave. A classic version of Spider-Man was later featured in the Hobgoblin Build-a-Figure wave, nicknamed "Pizza Spidey" by fans due to the presence of a slice of pizza. The Ultimate version of Spider-Man was then featured in the Space Venom Build-a-Figure series. The Symbiote version of Spider-Man then appeared in the Sandman Build-a-Figure wave. A Spider-Man: Homecoming-themed wave was then launched, with Vulture's wings as the "Build-a-Vehicle" this time. The line featured the movie version of Spider-Man in his costume and his homemade suit, as well as Cosmic Spider-Man. Spider-Man has also been featured in several two-packs and box sets, including a Captain America: Civil War-themed set that included Iron Man and Captain America, and a two-pack with Ultimate Vulture.
After liberating the Power Stone from the Nova Corps on Xandar, Thanos and his adoptive children—Ebony Maw, Cull Obsidian, Proxima Midnight, and Corvus Glaive—invade the spaceship carrying the Asgardians who escaped the destruction Asgard in search of the Tesseract. Despite Thor, Loki, Heimdall and the Hulk's valiant attempts to thwart Thanos' invasion they are quickly defeated by the mad titan and his children with Loki dying in the process. After subduing the ship's defenders, Thanos claims the Tesseract for himself. After claiming the Tesseract, Thanos destroys his newly acquired prize revealing that he never actually wanted the Tesseract, but the Space Stone that powered the Tesseract. With his prize in hand, Thanos destroys the ship before continuing the search for the remaining Infinity Stones with his children. Unbeknownst to Thanos, Heimdall used the last of his strength to send the Hulk through the Bifröst to Earth before the ship's destruction, so that he might warn the Avengers of the threat Thanos posed.
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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