Batman's utility belt is his most characteristic prop next to the Batarang, much like Wonder Woman's Lasso of Truth, or Green Lantern's power ring. The exact contents of this belt are not known because Batman usually changes it to suit his needs. His uncanny ability to carry unusually appropriate tools is legendary. Batman's enemies are especially interested in the utility belt as they believe it will give them an advantage over him, but the belt's pockets are locked and only Batman knows how to open them. Occasionally, the utility belt is depicted as having defense mechanisms such as electric shock or stun gas in order to prevent tampering.
What if someone else besides Spider-Man had been bitten by the radioactive spider explores what would have happened if Flash Thompson, Betty Brant or John Jameson were bitten by the spider, but all three prove to be failures as the 'new' Spider-Man. Each story ends with Peter extracting the residual radioactive venom from the dead spider and using it to create a serum to give himself powers, thus becoming Spider-Man.[47] Versions of all three appear in Spider-Verse where John is the only one that isn't killed by the Inheritors.[citation needed]

The Spider-Man Suit is a specialized suit used by Peter Parker to protect his identity as Spider-Man. Originally consisting of a hoodie with a spider symbol, blue pants, a blue shirt, and a red mask with black goggles to help him focus his senses, the suit received a "minor upgrade" from Tony Stark for Parker to use during the Clash of the Avengers. Stark allowed Parker to keep the suit after the Avengers Civil War.
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^ Norman Osborn using the Green Goblin alias is as commonly described as Spider-Man's archenemy.[140][143][144] Mostly after he is the first villain to uncover the hero's true identity, being responsible for setting up the death of Spider-Man's girlfriend in one of the most famous Spider-Man stories of all time which helped end the Silver Age of Comic Books and begin the Bronze Age of Comic Books.[140] He was thought to be dead after that but writers help bring him back from the 1990s and he returned to plague Spider-Man once more in the comic books (such as being involved of the killing of Aunt May) and other heroes (such as the Avengers[145]). He is also an enemy of Spider-Man sometimes just as himself and not just only as his Goblin persona.[146]
"Spider-Man" is the name of multiple comic book characters from the Marvel Comics Multiverse. The original and most well known is Peter Parker created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko originating from the Earth 616 universe. Within the mainstream Marvel Universe there have been other characters that have taken the mantle such as Ben Reilly and Doctor Octavius.
Spider-Man And His Amazing Friends series debuted on NBC on September 12, 1981 and lasted through September 10, 1983.This would be the third animated adventure for Spidey which would end up being more popular than its previous series Spider-Man, which ended the same year this new show would start. After Spider-Man in 1981, NBC wanted to take Spider-Man on a different route which would appeal to more audiences. In this series, Marvel adds X-Men's Iceman and adds a new superhero named Firestar. She gave Peter Parker a room that turned into a secret superhero hi-tech headquarters. This would change the title of the show to Spider-Man And His Amazing Friends. This series would added new villains only for this show and also have superhero team-ups throughout the series. They would fight some old enemies such as: Doctor Octopus, Scorpion, Green Goblin, Kraven the Hunter, Swarm, Chameleon, Electro, Mysterio, the Kingpin of Crime, Shocker, Sandman, Beetle, and other Marvel enemies such as: Doctor Doom, Magneto, Loki, Mordred, the Red Skull, and the Juggernaut. The Spider-Friends would also team-up with superheroes such as: Sunfire, Captain America, Shanna the She-Devil, Namor the Submariner, Doctor Strange, The Hulk, Thor, the third Black Knight, and the X-Men. For the second season of this show the title would be changed to "The Incredible Hulk And The Amazing Spider-Man." This second would be for an hour show that would feature 30 minutes of Spidey and friends and 30 minutes of Hulk. The third season of this show would then be reversed to "The Amazing Spider-Man and The Incredible Hulk." This would be the last season and would also still revolve around Spider-Man and his friends. Spider-Man was voiced by Dan Gilvezan.
This beggars belief. Yale students told to talk to each other if they find a peer’s costume offensive helplessly declare that they’re unable to do so without an authority figure specifying “any modes or means to facilitate these discussions,” as if they’re Martians unfamiliar with a concept as rudimentary as disagreeing in conversation, even as they publish an open letter that is, itself, a mode of facilitating discussion.
O LORD our God, increase, we pray thee, and multiply upon us the gifts of thy grace: that we, who do prevent the glorious festival of all thy Saints, may of thee be enabled joyfully to follow them in all virtuous and godly living. Through Jesus Christ, Our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Ghost, ever one God, world without end. Amen. —Collect of the Vigil of All Saints, The Anglican Breviary[209]
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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