One superpowered character was portrayed as an antiheroine, a rarity for its time: the Black Widow, a costumed emissary of Satan who killed evildoers in order to send them to Hell—debuted in Mystic Comics #4 (Aug. 1940), from Timely Comics, the 1940s predecessor of Marvel Comics. Most of the other female costumed crime-fighters during this era lacked superpowers. Notable characters include The Woman in Red,[18][19] introduced in Standard Comics' Thrilling Comics #2 (March 1940); Lady Luck, debuting in the Sunday-newspaper comic-book insert The Spirit Section June 2, 1940; the comedic character Red Tornado, debuting in All-American Comics #20 (Nov 1940); Miss Fury,[20] debuting in the eponymous comic strip by female cartoonist Tarpé Mills on April 6, 1941; the Phantom Lady, introduced in Quality Comics Police Comics #1 (Aug. 1941); the Black Cat,[21][22] introduced in Harvey Comics' Pocket Comics #1 (also Aug. 1941); and the Black Canary, introduced in Flash Comics #86 (Aug. 1947) as a supporting character.[23] The most iconic comic book superheroine, who debuted during the Golden Age, is Wonder Woman.[24] Modeled from the myth of the Amazons of Greek mythology, she was created by psychologist William Moulton Marston, with help and inspiration from his wife Elizabeth and their mutual lover Olive Byrne.[25][26] Wonder Woman's first appearance was in All Star Comics #8 (Dec. 1941), published by All-American Publications, one of two companies that would merge to form DC Comics in 1944.


If your son wants to showcase his warrior side, a boys ninja Halloween costume is a fabulous way to look super cool. Our red, green, blue and black ninja costumes harken back to those fighters of ancient Japan, with a thoroughly modern twist that’s perfect to wear while trick or treating or to any costume party. We carry everything from officially licensed Power Rangers Ninja Steel costumes to our Blackstone Ninja, Ice Dragon Ninja and Ghost Dragon Ninja costumes.
Spidey's next video game adventure was released on September 7th, 2010, in the form of Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions. In this game, you can play as four distinct Spider-Men in four different universes, in search of the shattered pieces of a legendary tablet. The game sometimes features sequences where the player is in first person and has to use the analog stick to win the fight, much like in some boxing games. The first dimension is the Amazing Universe (Earth 616), the world of regular comics Spider-Man that we know and love, voiced by Neil Patrick Harris. He uses mainly far-range combat to defeat his enemies, it is known he faces Sandman in this dimension. The second is the Noir Universe, which takes place in the 1940s, in a darker, stealthier, and grittier setting, where stealth and timing is crucial. In this dimension, Spider-Man Faces Hammerhead, Green Goblin and the Vulture. The third is 2099, taking place mostly in the skies, with many free falling levels. In this dimension, Spider-Man faces the Hobgoblin with a new, more advanced look. The final dimension is the Ultimate Universe, where Spider-Man has somehow been reunited with the Venom symbiote as his "gift" from Madame Webb. He battles Deadpool and many other bosses with symbiote tendrils and many more attacks. Carnage is the main boss of this dimension. In the end you battle a immensely empowered god-level Mysterio.
^ Jump up to: a b The Book of Occasional Services 2003. Church Publishing, Inc. 2004. Retrieved 31 October 2011. Service for All Hallows' Eve: This service may be used on the evening of October 31, known as All Hallows' Eve. Suitable festivities and entertainments may take place before or after this service, and a visit may be made to a cemetery or burial place.
Jump up ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 24. ISBN 978-0756692360. The Brain is an early Mobile Computer prototype built by I.C.M. in Midtown High School, where Peter Parker attended, it was deemed obsolete after Spidey's first encounter with it but it came back again.
In 1962, Marvel Comics editor and head writer Stan Lee was looking for a new superhero idea. He decided to create Spider-Man as a character with whom teens could identify, as there was a recent surge in teenage demand for comics. Lee was supposedly inspired for the concept of Spider-Man after observing a spider climb up a wall. Lee had to convince publisher Martin Goodman to introduce Spider-Man in the last issue of the canceled series Amazing Adult Fantasy, which was renamed Amazing Fantasy for that issue (#15, Aug. 1962). Lee then approached legendary artist Jack Kirby for an initial character design. However Lee was dissatisfied with Kirby’s attempt as the character turned out to be too heroic and Spider-Man was supposed to be a teenage boy. Lee then turned to Steve Ditko who developed the now iconic look of Spider-Man.
As different artists have taken over the responsibility of drawing the character, the details of the suit have changed considerably. The original incarnation of the cape was a wing-like structure inspired by drawings by Leonardo da Vinci. This eventually evolved into a more cape-like design of varying length. Some artists draw the cape with protrusions on the shoulders, likely representing the "thumb" part of a bat's wing, though this is not a consistent addition. The cape is occasionally depicted as bulletproof.The cape varies according to the current writer, sometimes being depicted as bulletproof and fire resistant, and other times being nothing more than simple fabric that tears easily and sustains constant damage and is continuously replaced.

In the Avengers Assemble episode "Planet Doom", Slinger's costume almost flawlessly resembles Spider-Man Noir's costume. This version of Spider-Man is a member of the Defenders, a resistance group of vigilantes who are against Doctor Doom, who has altered history and conquered the world. Slinger works alongside Bullseye (Clint Barton) and Snap (Sam Wilson), who are awaiting their foretold savior, the God of Thunder Thor's, arrival. After Doom's defeat, reality is restored to normal, and Slinger reverts to Spider-Man.
In 1991, Sega released the first Spider-Man arcade game titled Spider-Man: The Video Game. Sega also released The Amazing Spider-Man vs. The Kingpin the same year. The Nintendo home consoles were late to the Spider-Man party, but they saw many Spider-Man titles themselves. The first was Spider-Man: Return of the Sinister Six, released in 1992 and considered by some to be one of the worst Spider-Man games of all time. Not all Spider-Man titles followed original story lines. In 1994, Spider-Man and Venom: Maximum Carnage was released for the Super Nintendo and the Sega Genesis. The game closely followed the Maximum Carnage Story Arc. 1995 gave us Spider-Man and Venom: Separation Anxiety, which was released on the Sega Genesis, the Super Nintendo and the PC. That same year, Spider-Man: The Animated Series was released for the Genesis and the Super Nintendo; it followed the storyline of the series, with most of the characters being represented the way they were in the cartoon. The next Spider-Man game, Spider-Man: Web of Fire, was released for the Sega 32X. This game is one of rarest and most valuable Spider-Man games to date. For the next couple of years, no game completely dedicated to Spider-Man was released. However, in 1995 he made his fighting game debut in Capcom's Marvel Super Heroes arcade game (which was later ported to the Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn). He returned for the 1997 sequel Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter (which later ported to the Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn) and its 1998 followup, Marvel vs. Capcom: Clash of Super Heroes (which was later ported to the Sega Dreamcast and Sony PlayStation).
The Mutant X version of Spider-Man diverges from his mainstream counterpart in Amazing Spider-Man #102, in that he was unable or unwilling to cure himself of having six arms. For unexplained reasons, he reverses his name to Man-Spider. A third divergence occurs when he and his clone continue to coexist after the end of the original Clone Saga. The two keep this a secret by taking care to never appear in public at the same time,[19] but "Man-Spider" is forced to admit the truth after his clone is killed by Madelyne Pryor.[20] He himself is later killed.[21]
^ Jump up to: a b c DeFalco "1960s" in Gilbert (2008), p. 93: "Dr. Octopus shared many traits with Peter Parker. They were both shy, both interested in science, and both had trouble relating to women...Otto Octavius even looked like a grown up Peter Parker. Lee and Ditko intended Otto to be the man Peter might have become if he hadn't been raised with a sense of responsibility.
All seemed to go well again until Mary-Jane, whom had started acting again, was threatened by a stalker. It started with phone-calls, but when Mary-Jane took a plane, it exploded in mid-air and seemingly killed Mary-Jane. Peter, firstly stricken with grief, did not believe she had died. He knew it must have had something to do with the stalker, and Peter started a crusade to find out the truth. This brought him to Latveria and in a fight against the Hulk among others. Eventually, Peter learned that it was indeed the stalker that had faked Mary-Jane's death and had held her captive during it all. The stalker was a mutant that absorbed all of Peter's memories when he was saved by him during one of Spider-man's fights on the streets of New York. The Stalker needed Mary-Jan for himself because of it and he felled he knew her. Spider-man managed to save Mary-Jane and defeat the Stalker. Mary-Jane however was traumatized by the experience and needed time of from her life as the wife of a superhero. The two parted ways for some time.
There also contain many other versions of Spider-Man outside of comic books. Some in film, in television or in video games among countless other media. Some characters have crossed over in the comic book canon as one of the separate incarnations such as the Ultimate Spider-Man animated series version and the live-action Japanese show version appearing in "Spider-Verse". Also, one of the alternate Spider-Men from the series final of the 90s TV Show appeared in Spider-Verse as a background character, and the two live-action versions from the original trilogy and Amazing Spider-Man series are mentioned.

In a Manhattan warehouse, an innocent man has been murdered during a mysterious crime. Evidence points to the involvement of Venom-- the alien symbiote who is obsessed with Spider-Man's destruction. Yet Venom has always safeguarded innocent lives--- has he gone completely around the bend, or is there another suspect?Spider-Man thinks there is more to the crime than meets the eye. The spectre of the Hobgoblin, one of Spider-Man's nastiest villains, falls on a series of thefts, and leads the web-slinger to a deadly secret that may cause New York's destruction. Spider-Man must outsmart two of his most lethal foes to save the city-- but even more danger awaits him!


Arthur Stacy: Gwen Stacy's uncle, a private investigator, first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 1) #93 and #95. He was reintroduced only in the 1990s, in Peter Parker: Spider-Man #70 (in the last part of 'Clone Saga'). He is George's younger brother, but was originally presented in the 1970s as the older brother. For a time, Spider-Man would call on Stacy's skills as an investigator.
On Earth-11638, this version of Spider-Man is called the Amazing Spider who is rich, powerful, and popular where none of his loved ones has died. Peter runs Parker Technologies and his Uncle Ben spurs him to be the best. Upon inventing a portal technology, he unknowingly brought Earth-616's Spider-Man, Deadpool, and Hulk to Earth-11638. During a scuffle with Spider-Man in Amazing Spider's lair called the Web, Uncle Ben was about to plug Spider-Man into the machine. Amazing Spider was caught between the machine and was placed in a comatose state.[60] While in a coma, Amazing Spider's soul arrived in Hell where Bruce Banner's Sorcerer Supreme counterpart died fighting the Infernal Hulk. Though Bruce's astral form stayed alive and helped return the Amazing Spider to life with the souls of the repentant damned which gave him a second chance to live. When he awoke, he found himself transformed into a new character called the Ghost Spider. To make amends with Spider-Man, Ghost Spider transported him, Deadpool, and Hulk back to Earth-616.[61]

In order to censor the Daily Bugle, Osborn kidnaps the editor J. Jonah Jameson and has the Chameleon assume his place. The Chameleon-as-Jameson goes to Urich’s apartment and shoots him, unaware that Felicia witnessed the murder. Hardy goes to the Daily Bugle offices and kills the Chameleon, leaving his body to be discovered by Spider-Man shortly before the arrival of the police.[3] Spider-Man escapes the attentions of the police and goes to his home, where he killed the Vulture, in order to stop him from murdering Aunt Parker. Despite saving his aunt, May criticized him for killing the Vulture, as he could have stopped him with his powers. She told Peter that killing people would make him less of what makes him human.[4]
The thousands of Halloween postcards produced between the turn of the 20th century and the 1920s commonly show children but not trick-or-treating.[149] Trick-or-treating does not seem to have become a widespread practice until the 1930s, with the first U.S. appearances of the term in 1934,[150] and the first use in a national publication occurring in 1939.[151]

Digitale transformatie is een vaak voorkomend en veelomvattend begrip. Gelukkig weten wij hier wel raad mee. In een interview met CustomerFirst vertellen onze collega’s, Yvonne de Keijzer en Femke Oosterlinck, wat digitale transformatie voor ons in de praktijk betekent. Co-creatie en de combinatie mensen en technologie zijn bepalend om de ultieme klantrelatie- en beleving te...
Indira "Indy" Daimonji (appeared in Spider-Man: The New Animated Series): She is Peter Parker's potential love interest and a rival of Mary Jane Watson. She works at a news network down in Manhattan. She is seriously injured by Spider-Man in the series finale when Spider-Man is tricked by the Gaines Twins into injuring Indy. This led to Peter giving up being Spider-Man
A geneticist named Miguel O'Hara gained his spider-like powers from a gene-splicing incident, when the company he was about to quit injected him with a dangerous drug called Rapture. He tried to rid himself of the drug by using the Gene Slicer he helped to invent, but unbeknownst to him a jealous co-worker had set it to repeat the previous experiment of a spider. The last time they had tried this experiment it killed the test subject (the main reason Miguel O'Hara quit), but this time it worked. Instead of becoming a company owned version of Spider-Man he became the opposite, a Spider-Man to fight Alchemax and the other large corporations ruling the world in 2099. He now fights crime as the Spider-Man of 2099.[29]

When Marvel approached Hasbro about the prospect of including Spider-Man in the third issue of the Generation 1 comic book, they initially turned the idea down, since Spider-Man was currently licensed to rival toy company Mattel for the Secret Wars toyline. Marvel convinced them to permit the appearance by putting Spidey in his black costume, whereas the Secret Wars toy was clad in his traditional red and blue, and therefore wouldn't be "advertised" by the comic.[4] This meant adding a footnote to the story explaining that it took place prior to the recent issue of Spidey's own title in which he ditched the black threads upon finding out they were a symbiote.
It is widely believed that many Halloween traditions originated from ancient Celtic harvest festivals, particularly the Gaelic festival Samhain; that such festivals may have had pagan roots; and that Samhain itself was Christianized as Halloween by the early Church.[12][13][14][15][16] Some believe, however, that Halloween began solely as a Christian holiday, separate from ancient festivals like Samhain.[17][18][19][20]
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