In Marvel Zombies Return Spider-Man is teleported to a new world, where he consumes and infects the Sinister Six (except for Sandman). As his cosmic abilities did not come with him, and his webshooters have dried up, the zombified superhero is forced to make do with his own veins and arteries. Following the death of the Spider-Man of this universe (killed by Sandman in revenge for the deaths of the Sinister Six)[16] the zombie Spider-Man works on developing a cure for the plague with the aid of the Kitty Pryde of this universe, using nanites and the blood of this world's Wolverine.[17] With the zombie Giant-Man having followed Spider-Man to this new reality, Spider-Man resolves to stop Giant-Man.[18] Spider-Man releases the Sandman, now infused with nanites, and wipes out every zombie hero and villain. Zombie Spider-Man dies from being exposed to his own weapon.[volume & issue needed]
The sonar lenses in the first sequel remain the only attempt to add somewhat white lenses to the standard cowl in the live-action movies. A very similar sonar lenses idea was used at the end of Batman Forever, although with a very different look to the lenses. The sonar batsuit worn by Val Kilmer was also used to screentest actors like Cillian Murphy for the first movie. Ben Affleck's power armor in Batman v Superman also had glowing whiteish-blue lcd light eyes.
Jump up ^ DeFalco "1960s" in Gilbert (2008), p. 93: "Dr. Octopus shared many traits with Peter Parker. They were both shy, both interested in science, and both had trouble relating to women...Otto Octavius even looked like a grown-up Peter Parker. Lee and Ditko intended Otto to be the man Peter might have become if he hadn't been raised with a sense of responsibility.
Today's Halloween customs are thought to have been influenced by folk customs and beliefs from the Celtic-speaking countries, some of which are believed to have pagan roots.[36] Jack Santino, a folklorist, writes that "there was throughout Ireland an uneasy truce existing between customs and beliefs associated with Christianity and those associated with religions that were Irish before Christianity arrived".[37] Historian Nicholas Rogers, exploring the origins of Halloween, notes that while "some folklorists have detected its origins in the Roman feast of Pomona, the goddess of fruits and seeds, or in the festival of the dead called Parentalia, it is more typically linked to the Celtic festival of Samhain, which comes from the Old Irish for 'summer's end'."[38]
The Peter Parker of the daily Spider-Man newspaper strip continues his career as a struggling photographer constantly facing down the abuse of his less-than-satisfied boss J. Jonah Jameson, whilst battling crime in his disguise as Spider-Man. In addition to opposing classic enemies, much of the strip sees Peter battle new enemies. He has also teamed up with various heroes through the strip's run, such as Daredevil and Wolverine. He is married to Mary Jane in this continuity, and has often been aided by her in his battles with his enemies. This universe was visited by Morlun during the Spider-Verse event, but due to time distortions constantly resetting things so that the simplest actions take weeks to progress, Morlun finds his efforts to consume this version of Peter fruitless. The Master Weaver of the Inheritors elects to rebel against his masters for once and seals this universe away in a pocket dimension where it will remain safe from any further attacks.[22]
Peter's parents suddenly appeared in his life, claiming to have been abducted by communists. He had learned to love his "parents" and even revealed to them his secret identity. They turned out to be robots invented by the Chameleon to infiltrate Peter's life, discover his connections to Spider-Man and then kill him. The robot that masqueraded as Peter's father Richard was perfectly willing to accomplish his task and kill Peter, but the Mary robot had learned to love Peter and saw him as good person. Richard turned into a vicious engine of destruction. Before Richard could finish Peter off, Mary killed him using an electric cable. In return she was killed by the Vulture who was conspiring with the Chameleon. An enraged Spider-Man completely pummeled the Vulture but was stopped by the cries of his dying "mother". She told Peter in her last moments that despite everything, she still loved him. Spider-Man vowed to track down the Chameleon and make him suffer, which he eventually did after fighting through many assassins sent by the communist. Peter ultimately spared an emotionally broken Chameleon and left him for the authorities.
“First published in 1930, Gladiator is the tale of Hugo Danner, a man endowed from birth with extraordinary strength and speed. But Danner is no altruist. He spends his life trying to cope with his abilities, becoming a sports hero in college, later a sideshow act, a war hero, never truly finding peace with himself. The character of Danner inspired both Superman’s creators, and Lester Dent’s Doc Savage. But Wylie, an editor with the New Yorker, sought to develop more than a pulp hero. His Gladiator provides surprising insights into the difficulties suffered by the truly gifted when born in our midst.”
Family owned and operated for over 65 years, Rubie’s Costume Company is the largest designer, manufacturer and distributor of Halloween costumes and accessories in the world! We remain true to our founders’ vision by continually offering innovative products and a variety of styles for the whole family to enjoy, including pets! With the 3rd generation playing such an integral role in our future, we’re confident Halloween with Rubie’s will continue to flourish for years to come.

Following the camp depiction of the 1960s live-action television series, director Tim Burton's Batman films feature an all-black Batsuit with bright yellow chest emblem, brass utility belt, heavy armor placed on the chest, forearms, and boots, with the chest armor incorporating the bat-emblem. This became the basic template on which all subsequent live-action Batsuits were based.

There also contain many other versions of Spider-Man outside of comic books. Some in film, in television or in video games among countless other media. Some characters have crossed over in the comic book canon as one of the separate incarnations such as the Ultimate Spider-Man animated series version and the live-action Japanese show version appearing in "Spider-Verse". Also, one of the alternate Spider-Men from the series final of the 90s TV Show appeared in Spider-Verse as a background character, and the two live-action versions from the original trilogy and Amazing Spider-Man series are mentioned.
J. Jonah Jameson is depicted as the publisher of the Daily Bugle and is Peter Parker's boss and as a harsh critic of Spider-Man, always saying negative things about the superhero in the newspaper. Despite his role as Jameson's publishing editor and confidant Robbie Robertson is always depicted as a supporter of both Peter Parker and Spider-Man.[47]
A Broadway musical, Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, began previews on November 14, 2010, at the Foxwoods Theatre on Broadway, with the official opening night on June 14, 2011.[199][200] The music and lyrics were written by Bono and The Edge of the rock group U2, with a book by Julie Taymor, Glen Berger, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa.[201] Turn Off the Dark is currently the most expensive musical in Broadway history, costing an estimated $70 million.[202] In addition, the show's unusually high running costs are reported to have been about $1.2 million per week.[203]
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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