After waking up, Peter discovered he possessed arachnid superpowers. Donning a mask, Peter confronted Norman Osborn in his home in order to get him to give up his hold over the city. However, Peter was shocked to discover Urich, who was revealed to have been blackmailing Osborn with his information on the mob boss in exchange for fueling his drug habit. Angered, Peter left Urich. Upon returning home, Peter created a costume based on his uncle's World War I-era airman uniform and became the vigilante Spider-Man.[2] Peter later returned to Urich's apartment to force him to help him to bring down the Goblin, only to find the reporter dead. Strengthened with resolve from his aunt and Urich's lover, Felicia Hardy — owner of the Black Cat club — Peter thwarted the Goblin's criminal operations.[3]

Peter discovers that he is suffering from an unknown disease that is killing him. He seeks the help of the Marvel Universe's best scientists but none of them could help him so he decides to accept the inevitable. He is later attacked by the powerful Morlun, and after a brutal fight, the totem eater rips off Peter's eye, eats it and continues to beat Spider-Man to his apparent death. After his body is sent to the hospital, Morlun attempts to consume him, but after an intervention from Mary Jane, whom Morlun was about to kill, Spider-Man's form suddenly changed. His eyes glow red, his teeth become razor sharp and two poison stingers sprout from his arms. Peter attacks Morlun, stabs him in the shoulder with one of his stingers and bites him in the neck. He then apparently dies in MJ's arms. He finds himself face to face with a Spider monster who tells Peter that he has to either accept his spider side and evolve or die. Spider-Man embraces his "other" and recovers. He reunites with his friends and family and reveals that he has received new powers.
^ Jump up to: a b Morrow, Ed (2001). The Halloween Handbook. Kensington Publishing Corporation. p. 19. ISBN 9780806522272. Another contributor to the custom of dressing up at Halloween was the old Irish practice of marking All Hallows' Day with religious pageants that recounted biblical events. These were common during the Middle Ages all across Europe. The featured players dressed as saints and angels, but there were also plenty of roles for demons who had more fun, capering, acting devilish, and playing to the crows. The pageant began inside the church, then moved by procession to the churchyard, where it continued long into the night.
You have no idea how I did that. You have no knowledge of the laundry place. Maybe you speak French, and you can’t even hail a taxi. You can’t pay for one, you don’t have dollars in your pocket. Yet I knew how to do all of that. And you didn’t have to know any of it. All that complexity was hidden inside of me, and we were able to interact at a very high level of abstraction. That’s what objects are. They encapsulate complexity, and the interfaces to that complexity are high level.
i would say that that, in the comic book format, the first super-powered character would be popeye, who was capable of superhuman feats of strength by eathing spinach (1929). the same year also provided the comic book format with the first sort of vigilante-crime-fighter, the shadow. the full costumed crime fighter debuted in 1936 with the phantom. you can argue that the first time the medium of the comic book, the costume, and the super powers (not of magical origin - and i make that distinction because science, technology, mutation, etc. are devices that influence literature far more prominently post-industrial revolution, wheras magic and divinity were devices with long histories) were brought together was, indeed, the action comics superman debut issue.
To fight the deranged villain known as Massacre, Peter built himself a dark colored bulletproof armored costume that deflects bullets, and equipped himself with magnetic webbing that can be used to disable the radio frequencies of Massacre's charges. It is also lightweight, but needs to recharge after a certain period of usage. Peter has also incorporated the technology in improving road safety.
Author and Ditko scholar Blake Bell writes that it was Ditko who noted the similarities to the Fly. Ditko recalled that "Stan called Jack about the Fly", adding that "[d]ays later, Stan told me I would be penciling the story panel breakdowns from Stan's synopsis". It was at this point that the nature of the strip changed. "Out went the magic ring, adult Spider-Man and whatever legend ideas that Spider-Man story would have contained". Lee gave Ditko the premise of a teenager bitten by a spider and developing powers, a premise Ditko would expand upon to the point he became what Bell describes as "the first work for hire artist of his generation to create and control the narrative arc of his series". On the issue of the initial creation, Ditko states, "I still don't know whose idea was Spider-Man".[26] Kirby noted in a 1971 interview that it was Ditko who "got Spider-Man to roll, and the thing caught on because of what he did".[27] Lee, while claiming credit for the initial idea, has acknowledged Ditko's role, stating, "If Steve wants to be called co-creator, I think he deserves [it]".[28] He has further commented that Ditko's costume design was key to the character's success; since the costume completely covers Spider-Man's body, people of all races could visualize themselves inside the costume and thus more easily identify with the character.[17]
Jump up ^ Smith, Bonnie G. (2004). Women's History in Global Perspective. University of Illinois Press. p. 66. ISBN 9780252029318. Retrieved 14 December 2015. The pre-Christian observance obviously influenced the Christian celebration of All Hallows' Eve, just as the Taoist festival affected the newer Buddhist Ullambana festival. Although the Christian version of All Saints' and All Souls' Days came to emphasize prayers for the dead, visits to graves, and the role of the living assuring the safe passage to heaven of their departed loved ones, older notions never disappeared.
The Big Time story arc mainly deals with Peter's luck getting better after going through much turmoil. As Spider-Man, Peter has become a much more respected member of the Super-Hero community. Additionally, thanks to Marla Jameson, Peter has become a think tank scientist at Horizon Labs under the employ of known scientist Max Modell. Roderick Kingsley is murdered by a crazed Phil Urich who takes up the mantle of the Hobgoblin. He takes on the mission Kingpin initially assigned to Kingsley, which involved stealing a metal called reverbium from Horizon Labs. On Peter's first day at Horizon Labs, the lab is attacked by the new Hobgoblin who is using new weapons. After a fight with Spider-Man, Phil steals the reverbium and delivers it to Kingpin who allows Phil to work for him. Spider-Man designs himself a new Stealth Suit (Which has the ability to turn invisible.) to overcome Phil's Goblin Laugh which incapacitated him in their previous encounter. Along with the Black Cat, he attempts to take down Kingpin and Hobgoblin and steal back the reverbium. At Fisk Towers, Spider-Man and the Black Cat fight the Hobgoblin, Kingpin and his Hand Ninjas. The reverbium is destroyed along with Fisk Towers, and Hobgoblin and Kingpin escape. But despite everything, Peter is now living a life with his dignity intact. He now has a new girlfriend, a new apartment and a proud Aunt May and Jay Sr. Part 2 Alistair Smythe and his Spider-Slayers are back and taking aim at Mayor J. Jonah Jameson and his astronaut son John once again. Smythe returns Mac Gargan to his Scorpion identity and attacks the launch site where John is flying the Vertex shuttle into orbit which will meet up with a Horizon Labs space station. Spider-Man appears and web lines to a shuttle that just took off. Smythe has locked down the controls and rigged its booster rockets to explode before it leaves the atmosphere. To make matters worse, the evolved Scorpion appears to kill Spider-Man. But with secret help from Otto Octavius Spider-Man saves John. He gets help from the New Avengers in defending Jonah but Smythe sends his Insect Army after Jonah's loved ones. But Spidey and his friends cannot hurt the Insect Army, they can barely even touch them, as Smythe gave them their own spider-sense. Peter with the help from Max Modell creates the spider-sense disruptor. He is given the detonator and must be far from the center of the "explosion" or his sense might be also caught in in. But during the second fight against the Scorpion, Scorpion destroys the detonator, and Spider-Man must do it manually. And when he detonates it he is caught in the epicenter. The Insect Army has lost the spider-sense, but so has Spider-Man. After Spider-Man defeats the Scorpion, he goes to check on the others but Smythe suddenly appears and Spider-Man had not seen it coming due to not having spider-sense, but Marla Jameson did. She jumps right in front of Jonah, and saves him but scarifies her own life in the process. Spider-Man then defeats Smythe and for the first time, Jonah refuses to blame Spider-Man and blames himself instead.
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
×