Since the North American history is relatively short, in searching for the superhero, maybe you should take a look into European or Asian history. I’m pretty sure there were stories about the super-capable guys fighting for the justice long before the 1934. These stories were probably told by the word of mouth, more likely then written down or sketched.
In The New Batman Adventures (1997-1999) the Batsuit is revamped having the dark blue highlights on the cape, cowl, gloves, briefs, and boots changed to gray and the Bat-emblem is changed to a larger bat-emblem without the yellow ellipse and his utility belt is changed to light brown with the capsules being replaced with pouches. The Batsuit is based on the Batman: Year One costume.
In 1963, Astro Boy was adapted into a highly influential anime television series. Phantom Agents in 1964 focused on ninjas working for the Japanese government and would be the foundation for Sentai-type series. 1966 saw the debut of sci-fi/horror series Ultra Q created by Eiji Tsuburaya this would eventually lead on to the sequel Ultraman, spawning a successful franchise focused upon the Giant Hero subgenre where the Superheroes would be as big as giant monsters (Kaiju) that they fought.
And these aren't your dad's costumes. Anything you want to be, we have a costume for it. If you want to be a paladin, slashing his way through dungeons to save a princess, we've got a knight costume you need to see. If you're the kind of guy who can recite every Ben Stiller line from Zoolander, we've got that one too. If you're the type of guy who just needs that Raggedy Andy costume to make your girl happy for that couples costume she's been dying to wear with you, we can do you a solid. (It's cool, we've been there too). Whatever kind of guy you are and whatever kind of men's costume you need, you're going to find it here.
Originally, Peter Parker wore a homemade suit consisting of cheap red and blue clothing, particularly a blue longjohns under a red sleeveless hoodie with a black spider chest emblem, red fingerless gloves with black webbing designs on them, and black goggles to fight crime in New York City. He hid this suit from his aunt May in a loft above his room, which came down on a rope whenever someone opened it.
The items first appeared in the Very Scary Halloween Special event. They could be collected in the Eyeaduct map during the annual Haunted Halloween Special where a Haunted Halloween Gift would appear every five minutes on a server with 10 or more non-bot players. They were also available through the Mann Co. Store before November 8, 2011. Any gifts collected in the Underworld of Eyeaduct were awarded in the Haunted quality. Additionally, if the complete item set is worn, a special set effect could be applied.
This series debuted in March 8, 2008 and is still in continuation, airing on the CW 4Kids at 10:00 a.m on Saturday mornings. This series would also make the 10th television series about Spider-Man. This series starts with Spider-Man (voiced by Josh Keaton) talking about how he spent his summer vacation and introducing himself as the Spectacular Spider-Man. The day before school starts he wants his piece of the action. He ends up stopping Flint Marko and Alex O' Hirn. Spidey says that this was his third time stopping them and he pulls out his new device, the spider-signal. Norman Osborn acquires a new enemy in The Vulture. Before he became The Vulture, he was a man who worked for Oscorp and created an invention known as the tech. flight. He demands that Norman publicly apologize to him for stealing his inventions and to say that it was all his idea. Norman won't apologize stating that no one would believe that he had created it. But all is not lost, as he is soon saved by Your Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man. The series artwork was created by Sean "Cheeks" Galloway. The same person responsible for some character design work for the Hellboy animated movies. The character designs resemble those of The Batman TV series, as they have been designed by the same people who worked on that show. This series is supposed to be like the 1960's version of Spider-Man. It doesn't start off like all of the other incarnations of Spider-Man, starting off with Peter getting bitten by a radioactive spider but with a twist. Peter just starts his junior yeah of high school and gets pushed around by jocks. He made friends in Harry Osborn and Gwen Stacy. Gwen Stacy is also Peters intellectual equal, getting a job working for Doctor Connors. Gwen and Peter also see their old friend Eddie Brock who Peters call bro because their parents were best friends. Both Eddie's and Peter's parents died in a plane crash. Ever since then, Eddie and Peter have had a close friendship. Peter betrays Doctor Connors trust by taking pictures of Spider-Man and Doctor Connors as the Lizard. This puts a strain on their friendship and their "brotherhood". Eddie knows about Gwen liking him but after all the things that he did wrong, it was the final straw when Peter goes to the prom with Mary Jane. This series is full of twists and turns. It ends its first season with Eddie being taken over by the symbiote and turning into Venom. After almost being beaten by Venom, he saves Gwen and continues to have a Thanksgiving dinner. Aunt May has come out of hospital after recovering from a heart attack, Peter cooks the thanksgiving dinner, Gwen brings over her family dinner and they all enjoy a nice meal. Peter washes the dishes and goes outside thanking Gwen for what she has done and for always being there. As Gwen is about to leave, she runs back, taking the advice MJ gave her, and gives Peter a kiss. Peter then realizes what Venom was talking about when he said that he is going to take away the person who means the most to him.
'What if Spider-Man Had Kept His Six Arms?' explores what would have happened if Morbius was eaten by sharks and never made it to Connors Lab with a cure. Ultimately the arm mutation is irreversible, but it proves an advantage and he defeats most of his villains easily. Spider-Man even becomes a spokesman for the physically challenged, and inspires all to rise to their true potential. This Spider-Man appears in Spider-Verse and is killed by Daemos.[citation needed]
One superpowered character was portrayed as an antiheroine, a rarity for its time: the Black Widow, a costumed emissary of Satan who killed evildoers in order to send them to Hell—debuted in Mystic Comics #4 (Aug. 1940), from Timely Comics, the 1940s predecessor of Marvel Comics. Most of the other female costumed crime-fighters during this era lacked superpowers. Notable characters include The Woman in Red,[18][19] introduced in Standard Comics' Thrilling Comics #2 (March 1940); Lady Luck, debuting in the Sunday-newspaper comic-book insert The Spirit Section June 2, 1940; the comedic character Red Tornado, debuting in All-American Comics #20 (Nov 1940); Miss Fury,[20] debuting in the eponymous comic strip by female cartoonist Tarpé Mills on April 6, 1941; the Phantom Lady, introduced in Quality Comics Police Comics #1 (Aug. 1941); the Black Cat,[21][22] introduced in Harvey Comics' Pocket Comics #1 (also Aug. 1941); and the Black Canary, introduced in Flash Comics #86 (Aug. 1947) as a supporting character.[23] The most iconic comic book superheroine, who debuted during the Golden Age, is Wonder Woman.[24] Modeled from the myth of the Amazons of Greek mythology, she was created by psychologist William Moulton Marston, with help and inspiration from his wife Elizabeth and their mutual lover Olive Byrne.[25][26] Wonder Woman's first appearance was in All Star Comics #8 (Dec. 1941), published by All-American Publications, one of two companies that would merge to form DC Comics in 1944.
The true identity of this Captain Universe was never revealed but the host had more than likely had the Uni-Power for several years. During the battle that ensued between the Law Enforcement Squad and the Fantastic Four; Captain Universe and Dr. Druid ganged up on Reed Richards in order to destabilize the Fantastic Four's cohesion as a team. With only seconds to spare, Reed convinces Captain Universe that something is out of place and that the Fantastic Four are not his enemies. Captain Universe reveals to Druid that Reed is telling the truth, but before he can convince the others to stop fighting, he is struck down by Nova.
Spider-Man has had a large range of supporting characters introduced in the comics that are essential in the issues and storylines that star him. After his parents died, Peter Parker was raised by his loving aunt, May Parker, and his uncle and father figure, Ben Parker. After Uncle Ben is murdered by a burglar, Aunt May is virtually Peter's only family, and she and Peter are very close.[45]
^ Jump up to: a b Mary Mapes Dodge, ed. (1883). St. Nicholas Magazine. Scribner & Company. p. 93. 'Soul-cakes,' which the rich gave to the poor at the Halloween season, in return for which the recipients prayed for the souls of the givers and their friends. And this custom became so favored in popular esteem that, for a long time, it was a regular observance in the country towns of England for small companies to go from parish to parish, begging soul-cakes by singing under the windows some such verse as this: 'Soul, souls, for a soul-cake; Pray you good mistress, a soul-cake!'
Arthur Stacy: Gwen Stacy's uncle, a private investigator, first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 1) #93 and #95. He was reintroduced only in the 1990s, in Peter Parker: Spider-Man #70 (in the last part of 'Clone Saga'). He is George's younger brother, but was originally presented in the 1970s as the older brother. For a time, Spider-Man would call on Stacy's skills as an investigator.
Spider-Man has been featured numerous times in Hasbro's Marvel Legends series. He first appeared in the Movie Sandman Build-a-Figure wave in both his outfit from the first movie and his black costume from Spider-Man 3. He was next featured in the Arnim Zola Build-a-Figure series, this time sporting his Big Time costume. The movie version of Spider-Man from The Amazing Spider-Man 2 was then featured in the Ultimate Green Goblin Build-a-Figure wave. A classic version of Spider-Man was later featured in the Hobgoblin Build-a-Figure wave, nicknamed "Pizza Spidey" by fans due to the presence of a slice of pizza. The Ultimate version of Spider-Man was then featured in the Space Venom Build-a-Figure series. The Symbiote version of Spider-Man then appeared in the Sandman Build-a-Figure wave. A Spider-Man: Homecoming-themed wave was then launched, with Vulture's wings as the "Build-a-Vehicle" this time. The line featured the movie version of Spider-Man in his costume and his homemade suit, as well as Cosmic Spider-Man. Spider-Man has also been featured in several two-packs and box sets, including a Captain America: Civil War-themed set that included Iron Man and Captain America, and a two-pack with Ultimate Vulture.
This version of Spider-Man appeared in a 4 issue miniseries (Feb-May 2009). He exists in the Great Depression Era of New York in the 1930s. Aunt May is a speaker of equality and spends time standing on a soap box shouting her beliefs. Uncle Ben was killed by a crime syndicate run by Norman Osborn, aka The Goblin. Shortly afterward, Peter is bitten by a strange spider and endowed with mystical spider-powers. Though he has a wall-crawling ability, he has increased agility, strength, a form of spider-sense, and can spray nets of webbing from his hand. He then dons a black mask, gloves, and a trenchcoat and sets out to stop Norman and his gang!

In 1962, Stan Lee and Steve Ditko took to creating a story for what would be the final issue of a soon to be cancelled comic, and in it they created one of the biggest pop culture juggernauts ever: Spider-Man. That classic look has stayed with the character throughout his 50+ years of consistent publication, and as iconic as it may be there have been some alterations to the Spider-Man costumes over the years.

Spider-Man was declared the number one superhero on Bravo's Ultimate Super Heroes, Vixens, and Villains TV series in 2005.[174] Empire magazine placed him as the fifth-greatest comic book character of all time.[175] Wizard magazine placed Spider-Man as the third greatest comic book character on their website.[176] In 2011, Spider-Man placed third on IGN's Top 100 Comic Book Heroes of All Time, behind DC Comics characters Superman and Batman.[173] and sixth in their 2012 list of "The Top 50 Avengers".[177] In 2014, IGN identified Spider-Man the greatest Marvel Comics character of all time.[178] A 2015 poll at Comic Book Resources named Spider-Man the greatest Marvel character of all time.[179] IGN described him as the common everyman that represents many normal people but also noting his uniqueness compared to many top-tiered superheroes with his many depicted flaws as a superhero. IGN noted that despite being one of the most tragic superheroes of all time that he is "one of the most fun and snarky superheroes in existence."[173] Empire noted and praised that despite the many tragedies that Spider-Man faces that he retains his sense of humour at all times with his witty wisecracks. The magazine website appraised the depiction of his "iconic" superhero poses describing it as "a top artist's dream".[176]
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Spider-Man has had a large range of supporting characters introduced in the comics that are essential in the issues and storylines that star him. After his parents died, Peter Parker was raised by his loving aunt, May Parker, and his uncle and father figure, Ben Parker. After Uncle Ben is murdered by a burglar, Aunt May is virtually Peter's only family, and she and Peter are very close.
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The wierdly dressed Zur En Arrh Batman Skin comes from the alternate version of Batman seen in several comics. Batman of Zur-En-Arrh is in fact a backup personality of Bruce Wayne's - to be used in cases of extreme psychological trauma. This version of Batman is a lot more psychotic, and sees visions of a creature called Bat-Mite, among other apparations.
In issue #121 (June 1973),[49] the Green Goblin throws Gwen Stacy from a tower of either the Brooklyn Bridge (as depicted in the art) or the George Washington Bridge (as given in the text).[58][59] She dies during Spider-Man's rescue attempt; a note on the letters page of issue #125 states: "It saddens us to say that the whiplash effect she underwent when Spidey's webbing stopped her so suddenly was, in fact, what killed her."[60] The following issue, the Goblin appears to kill himself accidentally in the ensuing battle with Spider-Man.[61]
The Memory cloth is a piece of equipment that Bruce is shown by Lucius Fox at Applied Sciences. The item itself is normally soft and light, but when an electric current is passed through it the cape takes a rigid shape. Bruce took it, and the gloves then customized the skeleton and cut into bat wing shape scalloped cape and somehow made it a functional paraglider contraption.
The Uni-Power is an extra-dimensional force that possesses an individual (or on one occasion, twins) in a time of crisis, transforming that person into Captain Universe. As Captain Universe, the transformed person typically retains his or her original personality and appearance, though with Captain Universe's costume and heroic traits superimposed over the original. The Uni-Power itself emanates from the Enigma Force, the exact nature of which, naturally, remains an enigma. It is believed, however, to be connected to the Microverse, home of the Micronauts. Although the Uni-Power typically empowers normal, non-super-powered humans, it has in the past empowered Doctor Strange, Spider-Man, Commander Arcturus Rann of the Micronauts, a toddler, and a dog, among others. Its counterparts in various alternate timelines have also possessed Mar-Vell, Mr. Fantastic, a member of the alien Badoon race, a Doombot and Quasar. Because of its never-ending supply of energy it has been the target of many individuals, terrorist groups and peacekeeping agencies such as AIM, the Psycho-Man, Doctor Doom and even S.H.I.E.L.D.
In this example, the objects or instances are the individual superheroes described by the class Superhero. There could be an Ironman object, a Wonder Woman object, a Batman object, or a Spiderman object. The class Superhero associates certain attributes and methods with the superhero objects. For this example, each superhero will have the following attributes: strength, superpower, costume color, secret identity, points, and health. Additionally, each superhero will have the following methods (or actions): attack and heal.

A similar system for augmenting your superhero abilities is 'DNA', allowing you to genetically augment yourself with the remains of fallen enemies. Of course, there always has to be balance i science, so strength comes at the cost of health and speed and vice versa. No, this system isn't the work of Dr. Alphonse Mephesto - it's actually Jimmy Valmer's latest side project.
Jump up ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 60. ISBN 978-0756692360. Spider-Man was a proven hit, so Marvel decided to expand the wall-crawler's horizons with a new Spider-Man title...Its first issue featured Spidey teaming up with the Human Torch against the Sandman in a Christmas tale written by Roy Thomas with art by Ross Andru.
If he wants to bring his favorite periods of history to life, he can wear a boys historical Halloween costume such as a cave boy, pilgrim, or Union officer. If he wants to give off a more dangerous vibe, he can dress up as a gangster in a stylish black suit. He can even pair up with his friends for group costumes that play up these historical eras. These authentic looking, detailed costumes will help make him look like he could belong on the pages of his history book.
Spider-Man's exposure to the mutated spider venom induced a mutagenic, cerebellum-wide alteration of his engrams resulting in the ability to mentally control the flux of inter-atomic attraction (electrostatic force) between molecular boundary layers. This overcomes the outer electron shell's normal behavior of mutual repulsion with other outer electron shells and permits the tremendous potential for electron attraction to prevail. The mentally controlled sub-atomic particle responsible for this has yet to be identified. This ability to affect the attraction between surfaces is so far limited to Spider-Man's body (especially concentrated in his hands and feet) and another object, with an upper limit of several tons per finger. Limits to this ability seem to be psychosomatic, and the full nature of this ability has yet to be established. Spider-man utilizes this ability in his locomotion across New-York, but also has the ability to use it offensively, in a manner resembling the Mark of Kaine. Spider-Man rarely uses this ability though, due to its brutal and disfiguring effects. It also works differently, ripping off layers of skin and muscle, rather than burning it as Kaine does via the HCL secreted through his palms.
Captain Universe was the starring feature in issues #9-11 of the tryout series Marvel Spotlight. Marvel Spotlight editor Al Milgrom recalled being taken away by the concept of a Captain Universe serial: "You could come up with three issues, three disparate individuals - each one very different from the other - and see how they use their powers. They wouldn't necessarily be superheroic types; they'd be regular people who fell into the powers for just one issue. ... But Captain Universe never got his own title, so I'm guessing it didn't sell terribly well."[1] The character appeared sporadically through the remainder of the 1980s in titles such as Marvel Fanfare and Contest of Champions.

On an unnamed Earth, Norman Osborn is a six-armed version of Spider-Man. As Norman is informed of Harry moving through Oscorp and having been secretly armed, he is told that Harry is on the 15th floor near Mr. Warren's lab. Becoming Spider-Man and arriving where a warped Cosmic Cube is located, Norman confronts Harry who dons the Kobold armor. It was revealed during the fight that Norman killed Peter Parker as Harry fires a laser beam at the warped Cosmic Cube. As Oscorp starts to disintegrate, Norman is pleased that Harry finally gave him what he wanted by accidentally giving Norman access to the multiverse. Just then, Spider-Punk arrives and pulls Norman out much to his dismay.[82]
Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and hobby horses were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[65] From at least the 18th century, "imitating malignant spirits" led to playing pranks in Ireland and the Scottish Highlands. Wearing costumes and playing pranks at Halloween spread to England in the 20th century.[65] Traditionally, pranksters used hollowed out turnips or mangel wurzels often carved with grotesque faces as lanterns.[65] By those who made them, the lanterns were variously said to represent the spirits,[65] or were used to ward off evil spirits.[69][70] They were common in parts of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands in the 19th century,[65] as well as in Somerset (see Punkie Night). In the 20th century they spread to other parts of England and became generally known as jack-o'-lanterns.[65]
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