In 2008, Spider-Man: Web of Shadows was released. It contained an original storyline not related to the movies, in which players switch between Spidey's Black costume and his classic Red & Blue attire. Player's can dictate Spider-Man's actions, as he can be Heroic or Villainous, as related to his dependence on the symbiote. Many characters appear including Venom, Kingpin, Wolverine, Luke Cage, Mary Jane and others. It also has 4 different endings based on the path the player chooses. The consoles for this game are PS2, PS3, PC, Wii, Xbox, Xbox 360, PSP. Note: The PSP & PS2 versions of the game are very different from that of the PS3, Wii, Xbox 360 and PC versions. Spider-Man, voiced by Benjamin Diskin appears in Marvel: Ultimate Alliance 2 and is also one of the main characters. In the Pro-Registration story, he can wear his Iron Spider costume.
During the Spider-Verse storyline which featured Spider-Men from various alternate realities, Spider-Man Noir starred in one-shot comic Edge of Spider-Verse #1, at the end of which he was recruited by The Superior Spider-Man into his army of Spiders.[9] He was also featured prominently in Spider-Verse Team-Up #1, alongside a six-armed Spider-Man.[10] In Spider-Woman Vol. 5 #1, Spider-Man Noir found himself defending the lives of Silk and Spider-Woman (Jessica Drew) and got wounded in the process, after which he was returned to his home reality to heal and recuperate.[11]
After defeating Joey Spider-Man’s fame rose further. One day after seeing his aunt continue to struggle with the household finances, Peter finally decided he had to bring in some money. He contacted Maxie Shiffman who booked him an interview on a TV show. Spider-Man was given the slot of astronaut John Jameson much to the vexation of his father, publicist J. Jonah Jameson. As the host began to introducing the show’s guests he was attacked by the super powered villain Supercharger, who announced he will kill everyone in the audience to prove how dangerous super powered beings were. Spider-Man had never encountered a super villain before and thought real super heroes should deal with this. He attempted to call The Fantastic Four but after Supercharger attacked someone in the audience, Spider-Man stepped in and defeated his first super villain. “because that’s what super heroes do”.
In 1962, with the success of the Fantastic Four, Marvel Comics editor and head writer Stan Lee was casting about for a new superhero idea. He said the idea for Spider-Man arose from a surge in teenage demand for comic books, and the desire to create a character with whom teens could identify.[16]:1 In his autobiography, Lee cites the non-superhuman pulp magazine crime fighter the Spider as a great influence,[15]:130 and in a multitude of print and video interviews, Lee stated he was further inspired by seeing a spider climb up a wall—adding in his autobiography that he has told that story so often he has become unsure of whether or not this is true.[note 1] Although at the time teenage superheroes were usually given names ending with "boy", Lee says he chose "Spider-Man" because he wanted the character to age as the series progressed, and moreover felt the name "Spider-Boy" would have made the character sound inferior to other superheroes.[17] At that time Lee had to get only the consent of Marvel publisher Martin Goodman for the character's approval. In a 1986 interview, Lee described in detail his arguments to overcome Goodman's objections.[note 2] Goodman eventually agreed to a Spider-Man tryout in what Lee in numerous interviews recalled as what would be the final issue of the science-fiction and supernatural anthology series Amazing Adult Fantasy, which was renamed Amazing Fantasy for that single issue, #15 (cover-dated August 1962, on sale June 5, 1962).[18] In particular, Lee stated that the fact that it had already been decided that Amazing Fantasy would be cancelled after issue #15 was the only reason Goodman allowed him to use Spider-Man.[17] While this was indeed the final issue, its editorial page anticipated the comic continuing and that "The Spiderman [sic] ... will appear every month in Amazing."[18][19]

On route home after a night's drinking, Jack encounters the Devil and tricks him into climbing a tree. A quick-thinking Jack etches the sign of the cross into the bark, thus trapping the Devil. Jack strikes a bargain that Satan can never claim his soul. After a life of sin, drink, and mendacity, Jack is refused entry to heaven when he dies. Keeping his promise, the Devil refuses to let Jack into hell and throws a live coal straight from the fires of hell at him. It was a cold night, so Jack places the coal in a hollowed out turnip to stop it from going out, since which time Jack and his lantern have been roaming looking for a place to rest.[123]
Development of artifacts and symbols associated with Halloween formed over time. Jack-o'-lanterns are traditionally carried by guisers on All Hallows' Eve in order to frighten evil spirits.[97][120] There is a popular Irish Christian folktale associated with the jack-o'-lantern,[121] which in folklore is said to represent a "soul who has been denied entry into both heaven and hell":[122]
Following decades of false starts and numerous unused scripts, Spider-Man finally made it to the big screen in the year 2000. Spider-Man (2002), Spider-Man 2 (2004) and Spider-Man 3 (2007) comprised a trilogy of films starring Tobey Maguire as the title character, with Sam Raimi directing each installment. The trilogy featured a large host of characters from the comics, including Kirsten Dunst as Mary Jane Watson, James Franco as Harry Osborn, Willem Dafoe as Norman Osborn/Green Goblin, J.K. Simmons as J. Jonah Jameson, Alfred Molina as Otto Octavius/Doc Ock, Thomas Haden Church as Flint Marko/Sandman, Topher Grace as Eddie Brock/Venom, Rosemary Harris as Aunt May, Cliff Robertson as Uncle Ben, Dylan Baker as Dr. Curt Connors, Elizabeth Banks as Betty Brant and Bryce Dallas Howard as Gwen Stacy.
Being a kid can be tough. After all, our little ones know they have to wait a few years before they can fulfill their superhero potential. But there is one holiday that lets them get their inner superhero out. Of course, Halloween is the day that lets any boy or girl join up with the Avengers, Justice League, or the X-Men to live out their superhero dreams. So when groups of tiny heroes descend on local neighborhoods in search of Halloween treats, we’re sure they’re going to want to feel like real authentic heroes. Our deluxe kids’ superhero costumes fulfill that wish, and with a few extra touches you’ll be able to help them seal the deal as bonafide, authentic superheroes. Striking just the right pose or completing the ensemble with the perfect superhero accessories could be just the addition that take your little one’s experience from ordinary to extraordinary, so peruse these Love Your Look ideas for the tricks of the trade that we use to set the superhero scene just right!
Is there anything more perfect than Dorinda talking to her Halloween decorations? Yes, there is: It's drunk Dorinda trying to explain how she got her Lady Gaga costume made by way of Saturday Night Live, Andy Samberg and possibly Adam Sandler. Before she hosted her party—and got mad at Sonja for not greeting her as the host of the party—Dorinda hosted Luann for a post-divorce lunch.

^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 72. ISBN 978-0756692360. Writer Gerry Conway and artist Ross Andru introduced two major new characters to Spider-Man's world and the Marvel Universe in this self-contained issue. Not only would the vigilante known as the Punisher go on to be one of the most important and iconic Marvel creations of the 1970s, but his instigator, the Jackal, would become the next big threat in Spider-Man's life.
Jump up ^ Skelly, Tim. "Interview II: 'I created an army of characters, and now my connection to them is lost.'" (Initially broadcast over WNUR-FM on "The Great Electric Bird", May 14, 1971. Transcribed and published in The Nostalgia Journal #27.) Reprinted in The Comics Journal Library Volume One: Jack Kirby, George, Milo ed. May 2002, Fantagraphics Books. p. 16
In 2008, Art Asylum/Diamond Select Toys released their 24th set of Marvel Minimates figures which included Captain Universe/Cosmic Spider-Man. The figure came bundled in a two-pack with a Venom figure. It featured a removable mask and the face of a very determined-looking and angry Peter Parker with a non-removable reused hairpiece from Set 18's "Black Unmasked Spidey" figure.
In Marvel Zombies Return Spider-Man is teleported to a new world, where he consumes and infects the Sinister Six (except for Sandman). As his cosmic abilities did not come with him, and his webshooters have dried up, the zombified superhero is forced to make do with his own veins and arteries. Following the death of the Spider-Man of this universe (killed by Sandman in revenge for the deaths of the Sinister Six)[16] the zombie Spider-Man works on developing a cure for the plague with the aid of the Kitty Pryde of this universe, using nanites and the blood of this world's Wolverine.[17] With the zombie Giant-Man having followed Spider-Man to this new reality, Spider-Man resolves to stop Giant-Man.[18] Spider-Man releases the Sandman, now infused with nanites, and wipes out every zombie hero and villain. Zombie Spider-Man dies from being exposed to his own weapon.[volume & issue needed]
The practice may have originated in a Celtic festival, held on 31 October–1 November, to mark the beginning of winter. It was called Samhain in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, and Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Cornwall and Brittany. The festival is believed to have pre-Christian roots. After the Christianization of Ireland in the 5th century, some of these customs may have been retained in the Christian observance of All Hallows' Eve in that region—which continued to be called Samhain/Calan Gaeaf—blending the traditions of their ancestors with Christian ones.[2][3] It was seen as a liminal time, when the spirits or fairies (the Aos Sí), and the souls of the dead, could more easily come into our world.[4] It was believed that the Aos Sí needed to be propitiated to ensure that the people and their livestock survived the winter.
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